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Ice cream challenge summer: this week something with peaches

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So it started with rhubarb sorbet - which I have already raved about. Then came the fresh mint ice cream with chocolate crackles that just totally knocked our socks off. And a couple of days ago it was an intense coffee ice cream with bittersweet chocolate and coffee bean crackles (maybe too heavy on the coffee beans - next time will make less crackly).

And now the peaches are in. So, needless to say, peaches are tomorrow's flavour du jour. Any socks-knocking-off recipes out there? Some little twist to make an already perfect concept even perfecter? Maple? Honey? Bourbon? (I am in possession of a quantity of my own personal honey and very local maple syrup. I can also get local raspberries and possibly wild black raspberries if I'm feeling energetic.) I also have both sweet and sour cherries (sour ones are frozen).

Also looking toward the future - anything else I need to attempt before ice cream season ends?

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  1. Will you share the coffee ice cream recipe?
    I would caramelize peach slices and add some praline pecans to a vanilla base.

    1 Reply
    1. re: cheesymama

      I started this coffee ice cream recipe: http://www.simplyrecipes.com/recipes/...

      BUT then I made some changes. First, instead of the whole coffee beans in the recipe, I used very coarsely ground beans to infuse with the cream. I figured it would extract more flavour and I think I was right. Second change was that I strained the coffee grounds out of the cream before making the custard. It just seemed weird to make a custard with coffee grounds in it. Next time I will do the infusing and straining in a French press coffeemaker - which would make the whole process much simpler - straining through a strainer was a bit clunky. Then I proceeded with the recipe as written. The only other difference was that I ended up adding almost a whole additional cup of cream in order to make up for the loss of liquid in the straining process. I wanted to start with about 3-1/2 cups of liquid before freezing.

      To make the chocolate-coffee crackles, I melted about 3 oz of bittersweet chocolate and stirred in some coarsely ground coffee. This I dolloped into the ice cream maker toward the end of the churning process. The mixture solidified into little uneven bits that distributed themselves throughout the ice cream. It was generally agreed to be murderously good.

      Am considering some kind of grilled peach with bourbon or honey.

    2. Can't endorse this recipe because I haven't tried it yet, but it's is on my to-do list for this summer. I think it will need tweaking to add a little more fat, and I'd puree the raspberries and strain out the seeds.

      http://www.sugarandspiceandallthingsi...

      1 Reply
      1. re: ninrn

        I agree I would purée and strain out the raspberry seeds but I would leave a little of the peaches chunky. Just my taste..

      2. I'm a huge fan of rich, creamy ice creams, but this peach gelato (really more of a sorbet) is just perfect when you have really great peaches. I've made it with strawberries and mangoes as well, but nothing beats the peach version.

        http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/foo...

        1. I made this peach frozen yogurt last week, substituting Greek yogurt for the flavored type that the recipe called for. I know you were asking for ice cream, but the tang of the Greek yogurt was so good with the fresh peaches!

          http://www.myrecipes.com/recipe/peach...

          1. Roast your peaches first.

            Add a bit of star anise.

            2 Replies
            1. re: ipsedixit

              Roast the peaches? How hot / how long ?

              1. re: blue room

                This is what I do.

                http://gourmeted.com/2008/08/25/keepi...

            2. If you're wanting to infuse the dairy with peach flavor by simmering the peaches in it, you'll want to remove a lot of the moisture from the peaches before doing so or else the ice crystals in the ice cream will be too big. To solve this issue, you could make then use peach jam.

              Peaches are my favorite fruit so there's not much I can do to them to improve on them. So, I'd just do peach ice cream with no other flavors in it.

              Other ideas for fresh peaches are:

              Eaten whole
              Peach melba with Philadelphia-style ice cream and fresh mint
              Freezer jam (tastes way better to me than canned jam)

              1. Peach is my favorite ice cream to buy but I would consider it a waste for really ripe fresh peaches. I'd make an almond or amaretto ice cream and use the peaches to top it or make parfaits. Fresh peaches at their peak are best not messed with a lot. If you don't want to use liqueur, use canned almond filling to flavor your ice cream base.

                1. I like the idea (since you'l have both peaches and raspberries) of a peach melba-inspired ice cream. I'd do a vanilla bean-infused custard, swirled with alternate ribbons of peach and raspberry puree. I'd top with some toasted, slivered almonds and some soft whipped cream to serve, and garnish with a few fresh raspberries.

                  1. Peach + Ginger = Win!
                    I'm more of a sorbet fan myself, but the peach/ginger combo is the perfect blend of sweet and zing. Add some cream/milk from the ice cream base and it's a match made in heaven. My recommendation would be to infuse the milk with the ginger, strain it out, then add chunks of candied ginger to your base as it's stirring/freezing.

                    1. There's a recipe in the new Food & Wine for a salad with grilled peaches, onion and bacon....with a buttermilk dressing. I'm going to make it for a dinner party Friday.
                      Oops....just noticed I'm off topic. No ice cream. Oh well...still worth mentioning?

                      2 Replies
                      1. re: perk

                        I earmarked that recipe too, for when I get my hands on some really ripe peaches. Peach ice cream is a favorite too, though...

                        1. re: biondanonima

                          I'm going to make it tonight for a dinner party. The main course is the shrimp pasta on the cover. I'm not sure the two things go together all that well....but I'm anxious to try both recipes. Wish me luck!

                      2. For something a little different, I love peaches and thyme - I prefer sorbet or buttermilk ice cream (no eggs) for this since I don't think the thyme goes with a custard flavor as well, but it's a very sophisticated, not too sweet but definitely not savory combo.

                        1. Ok currently chilling the base for a batch of rum and brown sugar roasted peach ice cream. Will report.

                          3 Replies
                          1. re: Nyleve

                            Recipe please!

                            1. re: thursday

                              So far it's like this:

                              4 ripe peaches, pitted and halved. A spoonful of brown sugar in the cavity and a splosh of rum. Into the oven at 450 until caramelized and browned (sorry didn't pay attention how long it took - just waited until I could smell it from upstairs). Let cool, then remove as much peel as will come off. Dice half of them and set aside, put the rest into a bowl.

                              Into the bowl with the peach halves, add 1/2 cup brown sugar, 1/4 cup white sugar, 1 cup whipping cream and 1 cup milk. Blend it all up with an immersion blender. Place in a saucepan and heat just until steaming.

                              Put 6 egg yolks into a bowl and briefly scramble. Add ladlefuls of the hot cream mixture to the egg yolks and mix until well blended. You just want the egg yolks mixed into the warm cream. Now stir the egg mixture back into the cream in the saucepan and slowly heat everything, stirring constantly, until the mixture becomes slightly thickened (and coats a spoon or whatever else you have handy). Remove from heat immediately. Stir in 1 more cup whipping cream, the diced peaches and 1/4 cup of rum. Mix everything well, cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate until very cold. I'm leaving it until tomorrow.

                              And then we'll see.

                              So far I'm guessing it will be good but I can't imagine anything knocking the fresh mint chocolate crackle ice cream out of first place. You never know. Stay tuned until tomorrow for the final report.

                              1. re: Nyleve

                                Thank you!! Eagerly awaiting final report as I picked up 2 lbs of peaches from the seconds bin at the Farmer's market today - they need somewhere to go before they go bad, and this ice cream sounds divine!

                          2. PHILADELPHIA STYLE.
                            that is all.

                            2 Replies
                            1. re: Chowrin

                              Have you tried Philadelphia-style peach ice cream versus the traditional custard? I'm still waiting for the peaches to come in round here, but already dreaming of frozen treats. I just can't wrap my mind around the combination of peaches and custard, though.

                              1. re: JungMann

                                sure. At penn state (which wins awards for theirs), it's called Peachy Paterno.

                                Philadelphia style is best with fruits.

                            2. Ok report. So it was good, but not great. The peach flavour didn't come through the way I wanted it to - maybe needed some acidity to bring it to life. My son said it was like red bean or green tea ice cream - a bit flat and starchy. I personally couldn't get past a certain greasiness in the end. If I make peach ice cream again, it will probably be a really straightforward fresh peach, maybe Philadelphia style so no custard. Look, it's not going to get thrown out but it definitely didn't challenge the top two.

                              Sorry to disappoint.

                              Next up: double ginger. I think.

                              After that: toasted marshmallow with chocolate crackles.

                              1. I adapted Jeni's splendid Ice Cream recipe for strawberry/buttermilk ice cream, and used roasted apricots (peach is next!) instead. Roasted about 1.5 times what recipe calls for, so I could swirl in the remaining roasted apricot mixture into the finished ice cream when packing in a freezer container. YUMMIEST ice cream ever, and they weren't even the best apricots!

                                I roasted the stone fruit with raw sugar, so it would have some of that nice caremel-y flavor, and added some finely minced candied ginger. I love stone fruits and ginger.

                                I like this recipe as it is not a custard base, (no eggs) and you can really taste the subtle buttermilk flavor along with the fruit shining through. The ginger and the extra fruit swirl just takes it over the top!

                                Local peaches in a week... will report back on a batch with those!

                                 
                                4 Replies
                                1. re: gingershelley

                                  Gingershelley, this sounds great and I'd love to try it. Could you tell me a little bit about exact amounts you used.

                                  The strawberry version if this ice cream calls for roasting 2 pints of fruit, swirling half a cup into the ice cream mix and using the rest as topping.. Did you do 3 pints of apricots or about 3/4 cup? And did you only use half a cup of the puree in the mix before freezing as per the recipe, and swirl in all the remaining amount later, or did you add more fruit to the ice cream "batter" before freezing? Last questions, do you think this recipe would work if made with agave or maple syrup instead of corn syrup, and did you increase the sweetening at all with the extra fruit?

                                  Sorry for all the questions. I'm an ice cream newbie.

                                  Thanks a lot, Ninrn

                                  1. re: ninrn

                                    I made this recipe this weekend (just the ice cream part):
                                    http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/pa...

                                    I had really good, really ripe Texas peaches so I used 1.5 cups pureed (peeled) peaches along with 2 T. sugar as a substitute for the peach nectar.

                                    I served it with sliced peaches on top. Very good and very easy!

                                    1. re: meerastvargo

                                      Thanks so much for the link. I'll try it.

                                    2. re: ninrn

                                      I missed this series of questions, and just saw today when searching for more Jeni's Splendid Ice Cream comments...

                                      Apricots are back around, and will make this again soon.

                                      I must have used around 3/4 cup of fruit, or maybe more per my comments above.

                                      I did use only the recipes' called-for amount of fruit IN the ice cream, and used the rest as a layering ingredient (swirl) when packing to temper it.

                                      I cannot answer the ? about substituting agave or maple syrup for corn syrup, as I don't know how their properties would affect the ice cream base. You might search for a comparison of those sweeteners.

                                  2. I made a spiced whole peach sorbet which the people I served it to really loved when I made it. The recipe below made a smallish quantity as I just used what I had. You may need to adapt it for a machine. It scoops very soft straight from the freezer

                                    Spiced whole fruit peach sorbet

                                    5 peaches
                                    Juice of 1 lemon
                                    Juice of 1 clementine or 2 – 3 TBS orange juice
                                    1 egg white

                                    For the syrup:

                                    260g sugar
                                    350ml water
                                    1 cinnamon stick, broken in half
                                    1 star anise

                                    1) Bring a kettle of water to the boil. Cut a cross in the base and top of the peaches. Place peaches in a large bowl and immerse in the boiled water for five minutes

                                    2) Meanwhile, make the syrup. Bring the sugar, water and spices to a boil in a saucepan and simmer for about 10 minutes, until thick and syrupy. This may take more than 10 minutes.

                                    3) Place the peaches in a bowl of cold water or run them under a cold tap and peel them. The peel will come away from the areas with the crosses cut into them, so start from there. Remove the stones from the peaches

                                    4) Place the peaches in a food processor and puree. Add the lemon juice and clementine/orange juice and egg white and blitz to combine.

                                    5) Strain the sugar syrup and add to the peach puree. You need to taste continually here and add gradually as the amount of syrup you need depends on the sweetness of the peaches. Add until it’s sweeter than you think necessary because the sweetness is muted upon freezing. Blitz to combine.

                                    6) Freeze in a shallow container and occasionally take out of the freezer and scrape with a fork. Most recipes say to do this every half hour until solid but I just did it every now and then and then went to bed.

                                    7) The next day scrape the frozen puree with a fork then put in the food processor and blitz. The sorbet mixture was soft enough to do this. You’ll see it go much lighter in colour as the air is whipped into this. Return the mixture to the container and leave it for an hour or two, then repeat the blizting procedure to get it completely smooth and aerated.