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Where can I get the Tamago that's like Sponge cake... i.e. like the ones at Urasawa, I believe, without going to Urasawa I believe.

k
kevin Jul 9, 2012 10:32 PM

and if I'm not mistaken the ones at Sushi Zo are not sponge cake like, so that won't do.

And i just that I've never tried it at Shunji's, i wonder how the tamago is there.

  1. k
    kevin Jul 10, 2012 03:26 PM

    Ok, so if I had to choose based on a West LA joint for this type of tamago? Then, Kiriko or Mori ???

    Also, do I have to specifically state the sponge cake style or do they only carrry this one, sponge cake style of tamago, so I don't have worry about saying the right words.

    Thanks.

    I think because of JL and Peter, I'm on a freshly revivatilized sushi kick which is neither good for my pocketpook nor my waistline.

    Thanks again guys.

    4 Replies
    1. re: kevin
      n
      ns1 Jul 10, 2012 03:32 PM

      I know right?

      I dropped like 150 on the past 2 weeks on "cheap" sushi because of PeterCC and JL lol

      1. re: ns1
        PeterCC Jul 11, 2012 12:31 AM

        Whaaaaaa? :-) I guess, I should put a warning on my comments and reviews to read at your own risk...

      2. re: kevin
        j
        Jwsel Jul 10, 2012 09:02 PM

        I think Kiriko only makes its tamago one way and it is more like the sponge cake style.. It is usually in the display case so you can just point to it.

        Here's a link to a picture: http://s3-media4.ak.yelpcdn.com/bphot...

        1. re: Jwsel
          k
          kevin Jul 10, 2012 09:09 PM

          damn, that looks like what i'm after.

          darn, now i gotta get to kiriko on the double. make that on the triple.

      3. liu Jul 10, 2012 01:15 PM

        Getting it right can be very complex!

        In the documentary "Jiro Dreams of Sushi," Master Chef Jiro puts his apprentice through ten years of practice before he can begin to make tamago "properly" -- yes, his looks like the sponge cake version. And then the apprentice makes about a gazillion sheets of tamago and none of them is good enough.

        After seeing this documentary, one has a different appreciation for tamago. I have had this sponge cake version only a few times in L.A. at Mori, as others have mentioned.

        1 Reply
        1. re: liu
          n
          ns1 Jul 10, 2012 01:16 PM

          great documentary btw, I encourage all foodies to watch it.

        2. k
          kevin Jul 10, 2012 12:36 PM

          Upon reading it over again, I, myself, am quite disgusted at the use of words here.

          1 Reply
          1. re: kevin
            n
            ns1 Jul 10, 2012 12:41 PM

            I love it.

          2. m
            mrhooks Jul 10, 2012 11:20 AM

            It's called castella. I bought some at Mitsuwa during one of their food festivals. Unfortunately, it wasn't nearly as good as what Hiro-san offers. Actually, I didn't think it was very good, period. And it wasn't cheap either, like $23 for one cake I think. And this was several years ago.

            12 Replies
            1. re: mrhooks
              n
              ns1 Jul 10, 2012 11:23 AM

              We're talking about tamago that has the consistency of sponge cake, not sponge cake itself ;)

              1. re: ns1
                m
                mrhooks Jul 10, 2012 11:35 AM

                And I'm saying I don't think it's just tamago, no matter what the itamae at <insert sushi-ya of choice here> calls it. Others who have been to Urasawa have said the same thing before me, that the "tamago" is really castella. No offense to Hiro-san, because his "tamago" really is delicious, and that's what matters.

                If someone can provide definitive proof that it really is just tamago (say, they know how to make it, or they are a baking science expert and know for a fact that that sort of cell structure can be made from eggs alone, or they got a reliable ingredients list from Hiro-san), then cool, but I won't believe it otherwise.

                1. re: mrhooks
                  n
                  ns1 Jul 10, 2012 11:45 AM

                  Unless I'm missing something...

                  Castella is a popular Japanese sponge cake made of sugar, flour, eggs, and starch syrup.

                  Tamago is made by combining eggs, rice vinegar, and sometimes sugar or soy sauce. Additionally, sake is used in some recipes.

                  HTF could they possibly be the same, or even similar, in taste?

                  //edit

                  After looking at the picture/description, I can see where you're coming from.

                  1. re: mrhooks
                    n
                    ns1 Jul 10, 2012 11:47 AM

                    adding photo.

                    Described as...

                    "Urasawa has one of the more unconventional preparations of tamago around. Instead of an egg omelet, you receive something resembling a cake, sort of like a datemaki. It's a spongy, fluffy, moist contraption, with a sweet, yet eggy flavor. "

                    "Tamago / Egg Omelet - Tamago always signals the end of the sushi at Urasawa. Here, it's always made in-house, in a style that's completely different than what you'd see elsewhere. You'll find that the tamago is light, spongy, fluffy, and cake-like, with a flavor that's indeed eggy, but also quite sweet. In the photo above, we can see the makiyakinabe pan that the tamago is prepared in. "

                     
                    1. re: ns1
                      n
                      ns1 Jul 10, 2012 11:50 AM

                      Why can't you add more photos to old posts!?!?

                       
                       
                       
                      1. re: ns1
                        k
                        kevin Jul 10, 2012 12:32 PM

                        yeah, ns1, that's the sponge cake looking tamago, that i was referencing. the i can only tell from the look of it, since i've never had the pleasure of devouring the real deal, sponge cake kind.

                      2. re: mrhooks
                        Servorg Jul 10, 2012 11:51 AM

                        If you go to this blog http://divinejoybites.blogspot.com/ and the run a word search for Usuyaki Tamago you can see a photo of what I "believe" kevin is looking for.

                        1. re: Servorg
                          n
                          ns1 Jul 10, 2012 11:53 AM

                          Very interesting...

                          "One must-try here is the Usuyaki Tamago. Unlike Castella & Dashi Maki Tamago which propels toward dense and eggy, this traditional edomae-style egg is light-as-a-souffle cheesecake. The result of a tedious and time-consuming process of blending fishpaste with egg, then slow-cooking over a very low flame. Few chefs are making it now and I'm still on the hunt for more."

                           
                          1. re: ns1
                            m
                            mrhooks Jul 10, 2012 12:24 PM

                            Hmm. The fish paste must be the flour substitute. I knew it couldn't have been just eggs, rice vinegar, and sugar. Anyway, I stand corrected.

                            1. re: ns1
                              k
                              kevin Jul 10, 2012 12:34 PM

                              OH, darn, i want that already.

                              Ok, besides the delicious, food porn pictures, anyone have any other leads on it.

                              I guess I'll have to wait to hit Urasawa when I collect all my chump change together.

                      3. re: mrhooks
                        J.L. Jul 10, 2012 12:25 PM

                        Subtle but important difference between usuyaki tamago served at sushi-yas and Japanese kasutera (Castella) sponge cake...

                        The ingredients are different. There is no fish paste used in the making of kasutera. Every sushi chef has his own recipe for tamago.

                        If one lingers long enough at Shibucho (near closing time), you may get to see Shige-san prepare his usuyaki tamago - Cool stuff.

                        I believe the title of this thread gets the Oscar for "Best Stream-of-Consciousness Writing"...

                        1. re: J.L.
                          k
                          kevin Jul 10, 2012 12:35 PM

                          Sorry sue me... actually don't...

                          Sorry, guys, I believe it was late at night and the craving really hit. and yeah, probably stream of conciousness too.

                          my apologies again.

                      4. n
                        ns1 Jul 10, 2012 09:45 AM

                        Greatest thread title ever. Bonus points if someone wants to include a $$$$ cost for the tamago ;)

                        1 Reply
                        1. re: ns1
                          s
                          silence9 Jul 10, 2012 09:51 AM

                          You're right, I believe...

                        2. J.L. Jul 10, 2012 09:40 AM

                          Kiriko & Shibucho.

                          1 Reply
                          1. re: J.L.
                            k
                            kevin Jul 10, 2012 12:30 PM

                            which shibucho? really?

                            he makes the sponge cake kind ??? dang, for some reason that doesn't seem to register. but i'm overdue on a visit there anyhow.

                          2. c
                            chrishei Jul 10, 2012 12:23 AM

                            Kiriko's is fairly close.

                            1. PeterCC Jul 10, 2012 12:19 AM

                              I've never had it at Shunji, but I saw someone order it on one of my first visits, and I don't think it was the sponge cake style.

                              KevinEats.com has a review of the tamago at Mori from last March (http://www.kevineats.com/2011/03/mori...). One of the pics shows two styles of tamago, one of which looks like the spongecake kind but is made with fish cake...

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