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Brand new enameled cast iron dutch oven - sticking?

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FitMom4Life Jul 5, 2012 10:23 AM

I love cooking in a cast iron dutch oven, but mine were camp ovens, with feet. I got tired of manuvering them into the oven, and decided that I'd get a flat-bottomed one, and then said what the heck - I'll splurge a bit and get an enameled one, since I've read so much about how easy they clean up.

So I picked up a 5-qt Fontignac oven at BB&B, and while it was not as "renowned" as LC - it is made by Staub, and it seems to be of good quality.

Well I baked bread it in this weekend, and decided to not bother with the parchment paper (thinking that the enamelware would release the bread easily), and I had to practically chisel the bread out of the pot. I mean, the bread was every bit as delicious as it always is, what I could get out of the pot.

So...either I did something very wrong, or I was mistaken about how to use this type of cookware. Can someone educate me please?

  1. Chemicalkinetics Jul 5, 2012 10:59 AM

    <I've read so much about how easy they clean up.>

    Some believe that. I don't share this.

    <Well I baked bread it in this weekend, and decided to not bother with the parchment paper (thinking that the enamelware would release the bread easily), >

    In my experience, foods stick to enameled cast iron cookware less than bare cast iron cookware when the bare cast iron cookware is new. Once the bare cast iron cookware has been nicely seasoned, then it is the other way around.

    That being said, I have made a few bread using my enameled Dutch Oven. They usually do not stick very much. A little bit maybe, but not much. This could be due to two reasons. First, our recipe can be very different. Second, I usually sprinkled the bottom of the pot with some cornmeal or whatnot before putting the bread in. This will minimize sticking.

    2 Replies
    1. re: Chemicalkinetics
      d
      dixiegal Jul 6, 2012 03:33 AM

      I prefer well seasoned bare cast iron for bread baking. So much so that I baught the lodge loaf pans just for this purpose. Once the bare ci is seasoned well, I never have sticking issues with bread. That is, unless I use my bread baking ci for something else. Then I might have some sticking.

      1. re: dixiegal
        r
        ratgirlagogo Jul 6, 2012 05:05 PM

        I have baked cornbread and banana bread in my LC without a sticking problem for what it's worth, but I also use bare cast iron for most regular bread baking, partly because of reading so many posts on this board of people who messed up their LCs and Staubs doing the no-knead bread.

    2. Ruthie789 Jul 6, 2012 04:48 AM

      I have had to switch to enamel cast iron due health issues as cast iron releases iron. It was a well seasoned pan and I never had any sticking issues. My enamel one holds heat but if frying requires that you oil the pan and do not let it overheat or trouble and sticking will occur. For frying in it you need to heat it up at a lower temperature for a longer period of time and then fry you food at the temperature that you want. As for baking in it I am sure that you need to add parchment, corn meal, Pam, it does not react the same way as a regular cast iron pan. The enamel maintains the heat like the cast iron, but does not allow for food release. I had the same problems as you!

      5 Replies
      1. re: Ruthie789
        f
        FitMom4Life Jul 6, 2012 10:54 AM

        Well drat. I was hoping I could avoid the parchment. Oh well. Not sure I want to use cornmeal though...doesn't that become part of the loaf and change the crust taste a bit??

        1. re: FitMom4Life
          Ruthie789 Jul 6, 2012 03:37 PM

          It will indeed come into contact with bread, you can also use a bit of oats. If you use a larger texture of corn meal you might get away with less and then you could brush off excess once it cooled down. If you notice pumpernickel has some kind of grain under it, some pizza makers use corn meal, I don't think it will change it up that much. You could also grease and dust with flour AND sometimes the key to foods not sticking is to cool them off on a proper grated shelf and you must turn the goods over within about 10 minutes of cooling. Never force it out and within 1 hour of being upside down it usually falls into place. Sometimes you have to run a knife around the rim but food usually releases if you cool it down properly. If you are trying to get it out after 10 minutes you are not allowing for proper cooling time and you will have a disaster. It really helps to cool on a rack, it allows the air to circulate under it and cool off.

          1. re: FitMom4Life
            Chemicalkinetics Jul 6, 2012 03:40 PM

            <Oh well. Not sure I want to use cornmeal though...doesn't that become part of the loaf and change the crust taste a bit??>

            Not really, and you don't have to use cornmeal. There are other choice as Ruthie said.

            1. re: Chemicalkinetics
              f
              FitMom4Life Jul 6, 2012 09:01 PM

              I'm baking in the morning, and this time, I'll go with the parchment paper.

              1. re: FitMom4Life
                Chemicalkinetics Jul 6, 2012 09:38 PM

                Cool. I am sure parchment paper will work great.

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