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From: The Best of " The Best of Bridge ...and more" Hollandaise

iL Divo Jul 1, 2012 06:54 AM

page 21 of this cookbook talks about
"Never-Fail Blender Hollandaise"
it says, "Heat butter (1 c) to a full boil being careful not to brown."
that got me to thinking about liking the flavor of slightly browned butter in sauces such as sage and browned butter over pasta. in making Hollandaise sauce, would it really be a bad thing to let the butter brown just a bit to impart that nutty flavor to the Hollandaise?

  1. ursy_ten Dec 21, 2012 05:47 PM

    Interesting. I was just exploring how to make a hollandaise since I have a craving for eggs benedict. Did anyone end up trying the brown butter combination?

    1 Reply
    1. re: ursy_ten
      iL Divo Dec 24, 2012 12:16 AM

      I haven't tried it yet because not needed to make a hollandaise for anything.
      I've had no cravings for EB either as I have them entirely too often. love a great eggs Benedict but dern hard to come by. 2 weeks ago had 'em in Denver at Deletable Egg, 2 days ago in Las Vegas Venetian and neither (although highly touted) lived up to my taste buds' anticipation.

    2. Caroline1 Jul 3, 2012 02:09 AM

      If it rings your chimes, why not? As an interesting aside, I have taken to buying organic grass fed ghee on the web, and it's cheaper than buying organic grass fed butter and drawing it myself! And I'm surprised at how much farther ghee goes (on toast, for example) than regular butter. hmmm... Hollandaise...? I'm thinking! I'm thinking!

      1. iL Divo Jul 3, 2012 01:32 AM

        e_bone
        although I have no idea about St. Escoffier, I'm willing to try it.
        if going a bit on the light brown stage of butter doesn't work I'd be surprised.
        I assumed by reading "the B of the B of Bridge" browning ruined the taste or wouldn't chemically work. I still don't know why they mentioned don't let the butter brown.
        does it work but results in bad flavor or does it not work?

        1. e_bone Jul 2, 2012 05:23 PM

          You intrigued me... why wouldn't this work? I suspect that chemically the butter should behave the same. Milk solids separate when melting whether you're browning them or not. If there's a problem I think it might be that the sauce won't emulsify as well with browned butter but I don't understand why. Perhaps a food scientist can help us here?

          I'm game to try it. I think you need to name this sauce (Hollandaise aux Noisette?) and then say a prayer of contrition to Saint Escoffier as I bet this offends him.

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