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I love/hate grits. How do you feel about them?

Being a southern girl I love them BUT, I have grit rules... they must be smooth but not runny. Not so thick you can scoop them like ice cream. Cheese is acceptable. Here's where it gets nutty. I want them served with over medium eggs and breakfast meat only. If someone serves them with scrambled I will still eat them but runny egg yolks and grits is perfection. Southern ice cream as my dad used to call it. How do you love/ hate your grits?

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  1. It's a bit of a love/hate thing for me, too. I read a recipe the other day that cooked stone ground grits in the crock pot, and since I didn't have that much time before dinner, I cooked them low and slow for a couple of hours on the stove. Much longer than I usually cook them. They turned out delicious.
    I also threw in some Vidalia onions that I had cooked down in bacon fond, and served the grits with butter poached shrimp.
    For breakfast, I am a cheese grits girl all the way. Any kind of bacon and eggs in it is fine, too, but butter and cheese are the thing for me.

    Having been raised mostly in the Midwest, I'd never had grits till I was a teenager. After graduating high school, at 17, I spent a few months hitchhiking around the South. At a seedy boarding house I was staying at for a while in Durham North Carolina, they served grits every morning with breakfast. Being a lover of Cream of Wheat, I figured I'd try milk and sugar on those grits. So I asked the lady who cooked if I could have my grits in a little bowl with milk and sugar. She and the other roomers (who were a combination of schizophrenics and Socialists, parolees and oldsters, all from the South) looked at me like I had two heads, but she gave me my grits the way I wanted them.
    Now, living in Georgia, I eat my grits like a grown up, but someday I think I just may try the milk and sugar again, just for old time's sake.

    25 Replies
    1. re: jmcarthur8

      The two heads comment is funny. In my house it was perfectly acceptable to eat them sweet. I like them savory myself though. My dad ate them with. Utter and brown sugar. Sometimes cinnamon. I sometimes eat the instant with a slice of cheese. Please don't take away my southern card for eating instant

      1. re: jmcarthur8

        Having been raised mostly in the Midwest, I'd never had grits till I was a teenager....

        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

        That's funny....being raised in New Jersey, My first introduction was also as a teenager.....but in Wisconsin. I used to teach tennis at a summer camp in Beaver Dam. The Academy had a lot of instructors from Roanoke, Virginia and Sarasota, Florida. To give them a taste of home, the School kitchen prepared grits for them every morning. One day everyone was looking at the *Hottest Girl* in camp....she topped her grits off with Maple Syrup and the *Southern Boys* all had a good laugh. I asked what was so funny and they told me the only way to eat them was with butter, salt and pepper. I gave them a try and have been hooked ever since (40+ years).

        1. re: fourunder

          That is ironic. I am a third generation Sarasota native. Love me some grits!

        2. re: jmcarthur8

          My ex ate them with milk and sugar, too, which was always bizarre to me, a Southern purist- it's butter and salt for me, please, preferably with an over easy egg or 2 on top/alongside. Cheese grits are ok, but I really prefer them unadulterated other than my obligatory butter and salt.

          1. re: JenJeninCT

            My dad's family is from N.E. Georgia, in the mountains. They didn't eat grits very often but when they did it was with sugar. I've never had them sweet, don't really care for a sweet breakfast so have never felt compelled to try them that way.

            1. re: kengk

              That's funny, my family is from GA as well, although Atlanta and Southern coast

          2. re: jmcarthur8

            Yes, there is a "love-hate" attitude with grits. We have encountered many, who claimed, and often very loudly, that they could not eat grits. However, most of those same people fought to get polenta onto their plate - go figure.

            Hunt

            1. re: Bill Hunt

              I love polenta, hate grits. I have yet to see any grits that are yellow, that taste like polenta. I've only seen the white. If it is the exact same thing, the yellow, that is, then it must be nomenclature... called something different, but the same. In my experience, the two are very different.

              1. re: wyogal

                One of the things I don't recall seeing mentioned in this discussion is the differences in texture between good stone ground grits and polenta. Grits are much more coarse than the stone ground cornmeal that I use for polenta. To me that's the main difference. Other than the hominy thing. And I'm not going to get into the discussion about hominy. I grew up in the South and have my own opinion which nothing said here will change. : )

                For me, white for grits and yellow for polenta. Mmmmm.

                1. re: Leepa

                  Why do you use that particular cornmeal for polenta? Why not use a more coarse one? I just saw a slide show that shows at least 3 grinds of Italian cornmeal, from fine (often used for cakes and breads) to coarse. Bobs Red Mill sells a yellow 'grits/polenta' that is coarser than their stone ground corn meal.

                  The coarseness of the grind affects cooking time. But if you cook any grind long enough so that it is well hydrated, there shouldn't be a big difference in texture. It's when they are undercooked that quick grits can seem watery, and coarse grinds seem gritty.

                  http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/04...

                  bramata - moderately coarse
                  fioretto - fine
                  bianca - fine white
                  taragna - with buckwheat
                  integrale - whole grain, coarse

                  I believe instant polenta is quite popular on the Italian market as well.
                  http://www.polentamoretti.com/eng/sot...

                  1. re: paulj

                    I don't cook my grits for a short amount of time nor are they undercooked. They do maintain a texture but not a gritty one.

                    I don't cook polenta for quite as long a time as grits, but certainly enough time for them to become well cooked and creamy with less texture than my grits. My choices indicate my preference for the dishes. You are free to make your own choices.

                    1. re: Leepa

                      I'm just trying to make the case there's more (or is it less?) to the difference between grits and polenta than the grind size.

                      Polenta, at least in Italy, comes in various grinds, from fine to coarse. Grits also vary, from the relatively fine quick grits (Quaker and Albers are the 2 national brands), to stone ground with a wide range of grit sizes. Even cornmeal, yellow or white, can be cooked into a mush, and flavored with butter and cheddar.

                      Obviously grind does figure into people's preferences, regardless of what they call the mush.

                      1. re: paulj

                        I concede. I don't buy Quaker or Albers or any quick (or god forbid, instant) grits so I can't attest to their texture or grind size. No experience there, unfortunately.

                        1. re: Leepa

                          Do you get a local millers product? Anson Mills too expensive for me, though Trader Joes started to sell a while stone ground product which looks similar. I'm not entirely sold on it. I can work with almost anything.

                          1. re: paulj

                            Usually I do get local product. Most likely to be from Dellinger Mill in Mitchell County, NC. Sometimes from Nora Mill in Helen, GA. I keep meaning to stop by Falls Mills when I'm nearby in TN, but just keep forgetting. There are also a few other local mills, but those are the ones that come to mind.

                            1. re: paulj

                              Anson Mills is not the cheapest, but for us, it is not about the unit price, but about the level of enjoyment.

                              We source our grits from several sources, and enjoy them. Are any the cheapest option? I highly doubt it. Still, compared to the coins that fall through the holes in my trouser pockets, they are cheap, but provide enjoyment.

                              Just me,

                              Hunt

                          2. re: paulj

                            PaulJ,

                            I agree with you. There is polenta, then polenta, and finally polenta. It depends.

                            Same for grits. Some pick up some box of "instant grits, " and then pass judgement. Would they do the same on all hamburgers, when they have only had a Big Mac?

                            The world is a very large place, and to limit one's experience, on culinary things, to one experience, with a box, and a pot of boiling water, is sort of defeating the purpose - enjoyment.

                            Hunt

                            1. re: Bill Hunt

                              Do they sell instant grits in a box? I thought they only came in single serving packets? I've only used those for convenience when camping, and then decided they weren't good for even that (same for the 'add water' oatmeal). But quick grits, which call for 5 minutes of cooking (though I take them to 20) are quite palatable.

                              1. re: paulj

                                Paulj,

                                I am the last person to ask that question of. We never do "instant," and order in from several mills around the US (mostly South and Southeast). I have no idea.

                                Sorry,

                                Hunt

                      2. re: Leepa

                        Not always. It just depends.

                        I have had grits that are ground to almost a heavy dust, but have had others, that are about 1/16th of a kernel.

                        Which grits are your talking about?

                        Hunt

                      3. re: wyogal

                        Well, we have several suppliers of yellow grits, like Anson Mills, and College of the Ozarks. Grits do not have to be made from white corn - yellow corn is OK. They usually have different tastes, and in MY experiences, yellow grits are usually a bit more coarsely ground, than the general white grits, though not always. It just depends.

                        It is like saying that I hate white corn tortillas, but love yellow corn tortillas, or even blue corn tortillas. The answer is to order the one, that you DO like.

                        Hunt

                        1. re: Bill Hunt

                          I find that there isn't as big as a distinction between the various colors of chips as there is in polenta/grits types.

                          1. re: wyogal

                            Not sure that I agree, but it could well depend on the exact tortillas, or on personal tastes. For me, there are noticeable differences with either.

                            Hunt

                    2. re: jmcarthur8

                      JM, I'm with you. Driving through the South I ordered grits every morning and ate them as hot cereal with cream and sugar. Delicious. Yes, I got funny looks. This was easier if I just didn't make eye contact with anybody.

                      1. re: Querencia

                        That's good that you didn't. You missed all the gag reflexes that way.

                        Just kidding.... sorta. : D

                        Enjoy your grits the way you like em!

                    3. I enjoy them as you do....do not mind scrambled eggs at all, but prefer eggs basted or over easy, not medium. any breakfast meat is fine....butter, salt and pepper, of course.

                      Rather than cheese, I prefer variations of Shrimp and Grits to be enhanced with Concasse Tomatoes. Scallops and Mussels are also nice sea food additions. Andouille, Chorizo or Smoked Sausage or Tasso Ham also make nice savory additions

                      1. Hate. Cannot stand them no matter the texture or add-ins. SO LOVES them and orders them whenever he can, when we eat out. I do not make them.

                        1 Reply
                        1. re: JerryMe

                          Isn't it funny? You are on one side of the fence or the other. My bf looks in disgust as i eat them and he gets his McDonald's style has brown patty that he loves with his breakfast

                        2. Oh, manoman. I am a grits lover from waaaaaay back....Anson Mills, made with half milk and cooked for 45 minutes to an hour. THE penultimate vehicle for good unsalted butter and crunchy kosher salt and fresh-ground pepper, topped with medium eggs, crunchy brown bacon aside - or a delicous juicy sage-y sausage patty. I agree that cheese is acceptable. I prefer good sharp cheddar, but I have a girlfriend who stirs boursin into hers and it's actually pretty dang good. But oh yes, thick drippy golden egg yolk, butter drenched flowing into the perfection of the grits.
                          And a souffle can be delicious: grits mixed w/ cheese and crumbled bacon or sausage, mixed w/ egg yolks and combined w/ whipped egg whites folded in; baked till firm and puffy and then set to rest for 20 minutes. Boy do I love me some grits.
                          I also like to make extra and put it into a loaf pan, then slice and flour them the next day and saute in butter 'til crunchy outside and creamy inside. Awesome w/ chicken or sausage gravy, or tomato gravy for that matter.

                          32 Replies
                          1. re: mamachef

                            Grit cakes and tomato gravy. I just went straight back to my grandmas table. Don't forget the buttermilk biscuits so you can choose which to cover in gravy. I choose both, please.

                            1. re: suzigirl

                              Ohhhh, lucky you. My family thinks my love for all things Southron points to me being from another planet, since that's my catering/food history specialty. And of course, there shall be biscuits, plenty of warm flaky biscuits to mop everything up.

                              1. re: mamachef

                                I think you and i were cut from the same cloth

                              2. re: suzigirl

                                I like tomato gravy on the sausage, too.

                                1. re: jmcarthur8

                                  I would eat proper tomato gravy on a flipflop. I have had some pretty good ones but none hold a candle to grandma Mary's . Love you grandma and rip.

                                  1. re: suzigirl

                                    The only time I get tomato gravy is when the master breakfast maker in our Master Gardener organization does a big breakfast buffet for the rest of us. His is the only tomato gravy I've ever had, and it is absolutely delicious. I told him not to tell me how to make it - I only want his.

                                    1. re: jmcarthur8

                                      Trust me ....pick his brain. You will never duplicate it nor will anyone else. Stand at his hip and watch like a hawk. You will miss it horribly when it is gone and nothing else will fill his gravy filled shoes. Take my sage advice. I was to young to know how good grandma Mary's gravy was and have no idea how to recreate its deliciousness

                                      1. re: suzigirl

                                        Suzi, he did tell me he just adds a can of diced tomatoes to his regular sausage gravy. I did not ask how he makes his sausage gravy, though. That's when I stopped him from telling me any more.
                                        He's in his 70's, so maybe I'd better start helping with the cooking when he's in the kitchen ..before he passes the breakfast torch on to the next MG.. I told his wife I'd marry him for his scrambled eggs. They're that good. I want to watch him make those, too.

                                        1. re: jmcarthur8

                                          That sounds really good but it is not like the tomato gravy my grandma made. Hers was almost like cream of tomato soup but thicker. And slightly sweetened. Mary always made fried in a huge skillet. And we got a chocolate flavored chewable vitamin. We loved those silly thing in all their chalky glory.

                                          1. re: suzigirl

                                            suzigirl, is it possible that cream of tomato soup is exactly what grandma used as the base for her gravy, maybe adding a little roux? Even if she didn't it's an idea you could play around with, especially if the taste resonates with you. If she used home-canned strained tomatoes, or tomato sauce, and added whole milk or cream and a little sweetener (I'm thinking regular sugar, or perhaps a hit of molasses or cane syrup?), you might could play w/ that, too, subbing in a brand of really good commercial tomatoes if you can't lay your hands on home-canned, pureeing and straining them and then adding to a blonde roux w. some sugar and a hit of clove.

                                            1. re: mamachef

                                              I have tried canned tomato soup but grandma canned her own tomatoes so something she did I am missing a step. I think I can't buy the one thing I am missing, the most important ingredient of all..... love.

                                              1. re: suzigirl

                                                Awwwww. I totally understand. Bacon fat tastes a lot like love, but it's not the same thing at all.

                                    2. re: suzigirl

                                      Interesting, as my family ONLY did tomato gravy (with caramelized onions, bacon bits and bacon grease) on rice - never grits.

                                      Though from the deepest of the Deep South, shows how things can differ, family to family.

                                      Thanks,

                                      hunt

                                2. re: mamachef

                                  Back in Indiana, I used to buy the blocks of corn meal mush in the dairy department, sliced them up and fried them in butter. Served with maple syrup.
                                  They don't sell mush here in Georgia.

                                  1. re: jmcarthur8

                                    Try the pasta isle for polenta in a tube. It is non refrigerated and looks like the bulk sausage tube. Very similar creature that might quiet that nagging hunger for cornmeal mush. Good luck

                                    1. re: jmcarthur8

                                      Mmmmmmmm..........good stuff. And easy enough to make at home.'

                                      1. re: mamachef

                                        We do make it at home with leftover grits. But I love the name 'mush'.

                                      2. re: jmcarthur8

                                        Try that with left over oatmeal or cream of wheat!

                                        1. re: Becca Porter

                                          Did I misuse a word? it happens. Ok, well it conveys the meaning so I'm cool with it. Thank you!

                                          1. re: mamachef

                                            I think we all got your drift. Besides I am happy if I spell this gs correctly, let alone use them in.their proper context. Ya know? :-)

                                            1. re: suzigirl

                                              I hate auto spell check. Things not this gs, whatever the hell that means. Thanks auto spell check

                                            2. re: mamachef

                                              It is just a pet peeve of mine. I used to use it incorrectly, and now I try to spread the knowledge. Lol. No disrespect at all intended.

                                              1. re: Becca Porter

                                                None taken. My thanks was sincere. I don't mind standing corrected, and I'd rather use a word correctly than come off like a hillbilly. :)

                                                1. re: mamachef

                                                  Malapropism affects us all. Chowhounds in particular. Read enough on these boards and you'll see all sorts of hilarious uses and misuses of words.

                                              2. re: mamachef

                                                Penultimate means "the one before the last" or "the next to last," even though it looks like it should mean "the most ultimate" or something like that.... I used to always use it wrong, too, which is the only reason I know what it actually means, haha.

                                                  1. re: mamachef

                                                    Glad you read that with the spirit that was intended :)

                                                  2. re: kubasd

                                                    A fancy way of saying 'second best'

                                                1. re: Becca Porter

                                                  Not sure what you mean here. Maybe my glasses need cleaning, but I rather think that that poster had this in mind: http://www.bing.com/Dictionary/search...

                                                  The "ultimate" of anything, without question.

                                                  Maybe I am incorrect here?

                                                  Hunt

                                                  1. re: Bill Hunt

                                                    It comes from the word penult not ultimate. From your link, it means the next to the last of something. November is the penultimate month of the year.

                                                    1. re: Becca Porter

                                                      Ah, I had not picked up on what you were saying. Now I understand.

                                                      My confusion... my bad. The whole thing just went over my head, but no longer.

                                                      Thank you,

                                                      Hunt

                                              3. I've never had grits; primarily because I really don't know what they are. My impression is that grits don't have much taste and the consistency is similar to a bowl of cream of wheat. It would be like having a bowl of cereal with my ham and eggs. Am I wrong?

                                                21 Replies
                                                1. re: mucho gordo

                                                  Cream of wheat has much less texture. Grits are very mild in taste but are a wonderful foil for butter, salt and pepper.

                                                  1. re: mucho gordo

                                                    This is an interesting question and a bit of a poser, mucho gordo. You're correct; grits don't carry a lot of taste, and are more a vehicle that needs to be doctored up to really truly shine. But grits, plain, have a faint corny flavor. It's really a textural thing, sensorily. And they don't taste like cream of wheat or cream of rice. And if you asked a hundred people what grits taste like, (which basically, you just did :) you'll get a hundred different answers. Do try 'em, though. Just get really really good ones, defintely none of that instant or quick-cooking stuff, and if you can find some stone-milled grits, so much the better. And cook them for 15-20 minutes longer than most recipes call for, until they pull away from the edge of the sauce pan and just send up a little bubble now and again.

                                                    1. re: mamachef

                                                      How would I doctor it up? Can I add some chorizo to it, for example? One of my favorite treats is chorizo mixed with garlic mashed. Will grits be a good substitute?

                                                      1. re: mucho gordo

                                                        I would suggest you prepare, let cool and set ....cut into squares and pan fry crisp as another option.

                                                        1. re: mucho gordo

                                                          I'd take my maiden voyage with grits, buttered salted and peppered so you can enjoy the whole gestalt. If chorizo and garlic is your trip (and damn does that sound tasty), why not saute that chorizo and mashed garlic and serve it atop the grits with an egg prepared however you like it.. You are in for a treat, and a bigger treat if you saute some bell pepper and onion with that chorizo. Add some chiles; play around. Enjoy!!

                                                          1. re: mucho gordo

                                                            There's a breakfast joint down the street from me that does a "grits of the day" -- chorizo and caramelized onion and some kind of cheese is one of them, jalapeno and cheddar another. I've had the bacon and chive ones that were pretty darn good, but I like my grits plain with fried apples on top (like at Cracker Barrel) or cheesy with a runny fried egg on top.

                                                            1. re: LauraGrace

                                                              Yummy to all but the fried apples, but I won't say a difinative no. Will not knock til I try it.

                                                          1. re: paulj

                                                            Not really, I haven't been to any place that served it. Same with risotto which, in my mind, is just rice in a sauce. Looking forward to trying both. It's just grits that don't appeal for some reason.

                                                            1. re: mucho gordo

                                                              Risotto= 15 $ crunchy rice in a creamy sauce. Not a big fan.

                                                              1. re: suzigirl

                                                                You might like my risotto, then. I make it all wrong, allowing the rice to cook to tenderness and absorbing the sauce, so it's very thick. I sometimes mix it with eggs, chopped broccoli and more cheese, and bake it into a cake.

                                                                1. re: Isolda

                                                                  A maverick.... I like it! The Risotto cake sounds rule break enough to love.

                                                          2. re: mucho gordo

                                                            Well, you have a basis on the concept.

                                                            Grits are hominy (corn soaked in lye to swell the kernels up), then dried, then ground. Depending on several aspects of the prep, they might taste only slightly of corn, but not much. Sort of like rice, and much depends on the next steps of the prep - say BBQ shrimp w/ gravy, atop the grits.

                                                            They are the same thing as polenta, though the traditional preps might lead many to think otherwise. Same product, produced in the same exact way - but when the name changes, so often does the prep - hence the confusion.

                                                            Enjoy,

                                                            Hunt

                                                            1. re: Bill Hunt

                                                              I am still seeking a reliable source for the claim that 'hominy grits' are the same as 'ground hominy'. In other words, who uses lye in the preparation of their grits?
                                                              http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/3756...

                                                              1. re: paulj

                                                                Paulj,

                                                                Grits start out with corn. The corn is soaked in lye, to create what is usually called hominy. Those enlarged kernels are then dried, and finally ground into grits (or similar products).

                                                                Few cooks start with the corn kernels, and few use a lye bath, just as few have a mill, to grind the dried hominy. It is usually after those steps, including the grinding, that most encounter the final product.

                                                                It's kind of like foie gras - few raise the geese, or ducks. Few force-feed them. Few slaughter the fowl, for their livers (and other parts), but then they purchase foie gras for various preps.

                                                                Maybe contact Anson Mills for every step in their process?

                                                                Good luck, and enjoy,

                                                                Hunt

                                                                1. re: Bill Hunt

                                                                  http://www.ansonmills.com/recipes-cor...
                                                                  Anson mills on grits - history and cooking; one mention of processing corn with potash to make hominy (but nothing about grinding that hominy).

                                                                  http://www.sciway.net/sn/49.html#7
                                                                  describes stone grinding in a grist mill

                                                                  "Hominy is produced by soaking dried corn kernels in lye water, a corrosive (and poisonous!) solution made with wood ashes. This process removes the outer shell of the kernel (hull) and the germ, which is the small "heart" inside of the kernel that contains most of the nutrients. Although hominy is sometimes dried and ground into grits, it is often sold canned. We'll take regular grits, thank you."

                                                                  http://www.sciway.net/sc-photos/chest...
                                                                  photos from Blizzard branch grist mill. Note the one about filtering or sifting the ground corn to get cornmeal and grits (coarse and fine).

                                                                  http://www.sallybernstein.com/food/co...

                                                                  1. re: paulj

                                                                    Paul, I have been researching this for the past few days. I can find no evidence that makes me believe that grits are, or ever were, commonly produced with nixtamalized corn (hominy) here in the South East U.S. It is always harder to prove a negative rather than a positive. In this case though, I think that if grits were commonly produced with hominy there would be discussion of the processing. There is none to be found.

                                                                    Think about this, the hominy making would be a more involved process, requiring more resources, than the simple grinding of corn.. How would there be no mention of this?

                                                                    I think the whole confusion arises out of the term "hominy corn" which I think simply refers to a white corn with big kernels that folks would have grown for human consumption as meal and grits and sometimes as hominy. The hominy being produced to have a different foodstuff. This as opposed to the yellow dent corn grown for animal feed.

                                                                    I am speaking of grits on a local level, who knows what kind of processing Quaker, Jim Dandy etc. undergo.

                                                                    Yesterday I sent a letter to my acquaintance that runs a mill. It has been in his family for seven generations and I know him to be a history buff. If he replies I will start another thread.

                                                                    1. re: kengk

                                                                      Took another stab at this today and found this description of large scale corn milling. The only product they specify as coming from a nixtimalization process is masa flour.

                                                                      http://www.namamillers.org/ci_product...

                                                                      1. re: kengk

                                                                        Looks like the key term is 'tempering degerming process'. This is a dry alternative to the wet alkaline cooking (nixtimalization). A 'degerminator' removes most of the germ and the pericarp (hull).

                                                                        The largest grit coming out of this process is flattened into corn flakes. It can be further broken and sifted, producing brewers grits and table grits.

                                                                        In effect a mechanical means is used to remove the hull, as opposed to the wet chemical means.

                                                                        One reference says that the favorite corn for this dry milling is '#2 yellow dent corn'. It also says that the use of 'hominy' in names like hominy feed and hominy grits is a carry over from the old days (including an old Indian term for a mix ground corn and water), but does not imply nixtimalization.

                                                                        http://books.google.com/books?id=E59x...

                                                                        These sources pretty well confirm that if the corn is not clearly identified as stone ground (ground from the whole kernel), or as nixtimalized (masa as used in Mexico), it has been dry milled. This is doubly true is it is described as 'degerminated'.

                                                            2. re: mucho gordo

                                                              Grits are coarser than Cream of Wheat and have a strong corn flavor. Now here's a bit of trivia that I picked up once in some course or other: "grits" and "grist" are actually the same word, it's just that the two consonants got twisted around. So all they literally are is grist, or ground, corn. They do something to the corn to make it white, otherwise the result is coarse yellow cornmeal.

                                                              1. re: Querencia

                                                                BobsRedMill sells barley grits/meal, soy grits, millet grits, and white corn grits. I've also seen rye grits, though BRM calls their's cracked rye. But for some reason the same grind of wheat is called cracked wheat, and for oats, steel cut.