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Futomaki Rolls?

I am ignorant when it comes to sushi. My father used to work with Koreans, on weekends I would go with him. During lunch they would have these rolls for anyone that wanted some to eat. At first I was hesitant to try it but eventually I gave in and I loved it! My family moved to a different state and I do not have communication with the Koreans my father used to work with. So I am left not knowing what the roll was called or where I could find it. I did a bit of research on trying to find the name of the roll and Futomaki seemed to fit the criteria of how the roll looked and the ingredients it had.

I cannot seem to find any sushi places or markets that sell it. Perhaps it is under a different name? I believe that they bought these rolls from some market based on the packaging(styrofoam plate wrapped in plastic with a little price tag).

I am in Reseda CA and on a mission to find these rolls locally!

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  1. "Futomaki" is a generic term in Japanese for any thick sushi rolls (about 2" in diameter), whether filled with traditional ingredients or modern, ala California rolls and their brethren. In most sushi bars, however, if you simply order 'futomaki', you'll most likely get a traditional roll, and not a Monster Truck roll.

    I'm pretty ignorant of Korean food, so I can't say what passes for Korean futomaki.

    You also might want to post on the LA board, too.

    1. Mario, I know this is quite a ways for you but thought I'd try to help you with the name -- Gimbap/Kimbap. Been a while since I was in the Valley but you can check with your closest Korean Market for recs. Our local markets have them pre-packaged but since Tony C introduced me to Awoolim (I like the tuna), hard to pass up on freshly made rolls.
      http://www.yelp.com/biz/awoolim-norwalk

      You can also check restos like this one (again, too far for you but hopefully gives you an idea with your search). http://www.yelp.com/biz/jongro-kimbap...

      How about Greenland, 17643 Sherman Way, Van Nuys, CA 91406, (818) 708-7396 or
      Galleria Market, 10201 Reseda Blvd, Northridge, CA 91324, (818) 772-5755.

      Tony, any recs for Mario?

      Good luck...

      1. When I started eating sushi over 35 years ago, there was a little Mom & Pop sushi joint in Panorama City where I got my sushi education. Anyway, it was there that I had futomaki for the first time. In those days, most places served it. I would say it typically had egg omlette, gobo, other vegetables and some pink fish stuff that reminds me of cotton candy. Anywhere I go for sushi, I ask if they make futomaki, usually I get a blank stare along with a shake of the head, no. Anyway, Sachi Sushi in Pasadena makes it but without the pink stuff. I would think that in Reseda(my old, old, stomping grounds), there should still be places that make it. I would just start calling and asking. If you find a good source, please post. PS I like Korean rolls but I wouldn't say they are exactly like what I would get in an old school Japanese run restaurant.

        1. Not anywhere close to Reseda, but if you are ever down in Costa Mesa, order in advance to go Futomaki from Shibucho.

          4 Replies
          1. re: Sgee

            Shibucho's futomaki are awesome, but I have a feeling the OP is looking for something else (Korean, pre-packaged).

            On a side note, Shibutani has retired. Naga runs the place by himself now.

            1. re: Tkn

              Thank you all for all your help. Now I have a better understanding of What I'm searching for. Sorry for the late response!

              1. re: marioj92r

                My mom used to make futomaki rolls for New Year's. It was a lot of work. It was the Japanese version and it had kanpyo (dried gourd strips cooked in liquid), tamago (kind of a sweetened scrambled eggs cut into strips), cooked carrot, cooked spinach, sliced raw cucumber, cooked eel, and cooked shrimp she would grind into a powdery consistency, dried seaweed and rice (with rice vinegar). I think it's kind of "old school," so I don't see it around much although I don't frequent many sushi places. I've had it at Sushimon in Torrance, but it's a much less fancy version but for me will do in a pinch. My sister sometimes brings over a Korean version that has even less stuff in it from Market World in Torrance. These are nowhere near the OP's location, but I'm just tossing it out there for the info. I would say he should find his nearest Korean market and ask. I don't know what the Koreans call their version. i remember asking a young asian guy at some low cost sushi place in Little Tokyo for futomaki and he looked at me blankly. Looking at my confused expression he said, "I don't know what that is....I'm Korean."

                1. re: marioj92r

                  WeFlipBurger's right, you're looking for kimbap. She's also right since Greeland(s) always have kimbap, see: http://www.yelp.com/biz_photos/AqegkM... In Reseda, looks like http://www.yelp.com/biz/valley-seoul-... has what you're looking for.

                  Biggest diff between kimbap and an actual "futomaki" is obviously the rice. Koreans (always loaning foods and poorly co-opting) don't bother with vinegar, and just wrap short grain rice. Kimbap can have canned tuna *hurl*, Krab, odeng, kalbi, etc, which often isn't found in futomaki.

            2. There was a prior thread on this subject from 2009 here on the LA board: http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/663445 and, while I don't know if this link will be helpful to you it may end up being helpful the next time this subject "rolls" around...

              1. I recommend the futomaki at Japanese grocers: Mitsuwa (Venice & Centinela) or Nijiya (Sawtelle). Mitsuwa's is better, I think. Both places are much cheaper than any restaurant and super fresh.

                I'm talking about the traditional Japanese futomaki that Feed_me describes:

                "Japanese version and it had kanpyo (dried gourd strips cooked in liquid), tamago (kind of a sweetened scrambled eggs cut into strips), cooked carrot, cooked spinach, sliced raw cucumber, cooked eel, and cooked shrimp she would grind into a powdery consistency, dried seaweed and rice (with rice vinegar). I think it's kind of "old school," "

                1. For Japanese futomaki, I really like the pre-made tutomaki at Yama in San Gabriel. Yama-san also makes really good inari sushi and also "California roll" (which is really more like a crab and mayonnaise salad roll). This is take out only -- no place to eat in.

                  I've never found really good store-bought kimbap, possibly because my wife makes amazing kimbap (my favorite: home-made kimchi with home-made jang jo rim kimbap and that really pricy fermented oshinko from Mitsuwa -- I don't know the name). But the best I've found for sale is at Sindangdong in the food court in Korteatown Plaza.

                  Yama Seafood LA
                  911 W Las Tunas Dr, San Gabriel, CA 91776
                  626-281-8045

                  Sindangdong Restaurant
                  Koreatown Plaza food court, 928 S Western Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90006
                  213-382-1234

                  1 Reply
                  1. re: Peripatetic

                    I'm so glad you mentioned Yama. I used to go there all the time for their tuna. I was really perplexed when I asked them to do a platter for a party and they said no. Don't know if things have changed but they were perfectly happy to just sell individual orders or what they had in the case. It is time for me to go back!