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Would a Robo coupe do more cell damage than a Knife?

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shezmu May 26, 2012 05:32 PM

Warning: physics question approaching.

I think this goes here? Anywho, I'm having trouble putting this into words but, how sharp does the blade(s) of a veg prep machine like a Robo coupe *act* when in use relative to a knife? would dicing product by a veg prep machine do more cell damage to the product than a knife would? I'm sorry if I'm not articulating the question well enough.

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    GH1618 May 26, 2012 05:50 PM

    My guess is that a food processor would do more merely because of making a lot more cuts.

    1. Chemicalkinetics May 26, 2012 07:19 PM

      <how sharp does the blade(s) of a veg prep machine like a Robo coupe *act* when in use relative to a knife?>

      Usually speaking, a food processor blade is not as sharp as that of a kitchen knife. Threee reasons. First, the blade steel of a vegetable prep machine is usually not as good than a high end to a medium grade kitchen knife. Second, people rarely sharpen the blade of a food processor, so it just get duller and duller. Third, the food processor blade get abused much more and degrade faster.

      <would dicing product by a veg prep machine do more cell damage to the product than a knife would?>

      Yes -- for two reasons. First, as you have mentioned, the blade of a food processor is not as sharp. A dull edge does more damage than a sharp edge. Second, foods are cut against a solid support. They are being beaten and swung around like .... a pinata

      4 Replies
      1. re: Chemicalkinetics
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        shezmu May 26, 2012 10:42 PM

        Just to make sure we're on the same page, I'm thinking something like http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BRjx6y... , not a normal food processor.

        @Chemicalkinetics- Okay. By the way, just so I don't look (as) dumb, I was thinking that due to the (far) higher speed that a prep machine operates at, the blade would act a lot sharper than it is normally. To be sure, you're saying that this does not compensate for the (lack of) quality in a veg prep machine blade?

        1. re: shezmu
          TeRReT May 27, 2012 12:08 AM

          The robo coupe is an incredible machine, best food processor on the market without question. . It might perform some of those functions, but its not going to be a finesse machine. For mushroom soup we'd use the slicer to slice mushrooms since after it was cooked we'd be blitzing it, but we had to hand slice mushrooms for pasta as it bruised the mushrooms while it cut them and they discoloured. That machine is a bit larger and has more attachments and it may work for things like onions and french fries, I'm not entirely sure. It is an expensive piece of equipment though. And we had 2 blades for our robo at the one restaurant we'd use one and have the other sharpened and switch them every couple months.

          1. re: shezmu
            Chemicalkinetics May 27, 2012 12:22 AM

            Ah, thanks for the video.

            In the video you have linked to, it looks like the foods are immediately ejected after being cut, kind of like an automated mandolin. As such, I am guessing the damage would be about the same as a kitchen knife for most vegetables

            <due to the (far) higher speed that a prep machine operates at, the blade would act a lot sharper than it is normally>

            It depends what you mean by sharp. The faster speed and greater force will allow the blade to force through what would be difficult at slower speeds, and to some extends you are correct that the faster speed will result in cleaner cuts for certain foods like potatoes or carrots. On the other hand, a machine like this relies mostly on a push cutting motion, kind of like a mandolin: the food is forced against a blade, or the blade is forced against a food. Certain foods, however, are better cut with a slicing motion. For example, ripped soft tomatoes, meats, fish filets....etc.

            Think about it. When you cut a piece of meat.... don't you usually slice the meat by using a large forward or backward with a knife? What would happen if you simply push the knife down on a meat?

            1. re: Chemicalkinetics
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              shezmu May 27, 2012 10:56 AM

              Not good things I believe. Okay, thanks for the responses, guys.

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