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Cooking Squash

  • m

Stupid Question:

What is the correct way to cook yellow squash? Do I boil it? If so, for how long? Do I grill it afterwards to give it the nice grill marks? Do I leave the skin on or peel them?

Thanks

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  1. First off - there's no such thing as a "stupid question".

    I'm guessing you're talking about thin-skinned yellow "summer" squash, like Yellow Crookneck, Yellow Straightneck, or Gold Zucchini, etc., etc.?

    No need to peel, boil, or pre-cook any way at all. Perfectly edible sliced raw into salads; or made into pickles; added to soups; steamed or sauteed in butter or olive oil until "just" tender; or sliced lengthwise, brushed with olive oil & herbs & grilled or broiled; or - if they're particularly large ones, even stuffed & baked - the sky is the limit with both green & yellow summer squashes. Very versatile vegetables.

    The only caveat? DON'T OVERCOOK THEM!! Nothing worse than bland mushy summer squash - regardless of whether it's yellow or green.

    1. As Bacardi1 pointed out, bake, boil, broil, steam, BBQ, fry, grill; what ever you'd like to try works with yellow squash. If it yields to the gentle pressure of a fork, it's done. While I don't personally care for it raw, that too is an option.
      Here's all about squash, A to Z
      http://www.thenibble.com/reviews/main...

      1. Last night I sweated some chopped onion and garlic then added sliced yellow and green squash and sauteed them in the same pan as the onion and garlic. Seasoned with salt and pepper. It was pretty good. The veggie lovers in the family applauded and the veggie haters ate them and didn't complain. That's a win in my house.

        1. Southern Style ~~~~ In butter or margarine S_L_O_ W_L_Y caramelize at least 1/2 or more of a large onion sliced (I use a whole one)...Vidalia if at all possible. Trim and slice the squash into round circles...not to thin. Add a little water to the pan and cook until your desired degree of doneness...Salt & Course Pepper to taste. ~~ Some folks use bacon fat to caramelize the onion in place of the butter/margarine....or you could use a little of both. ~~ How long to cook is a personal preference...From 'jes' tender to all the way down to where the squash is soft and a dark, dark yellow mixture of squash and caramelized onions....or anywhere in between.

          Another idea I like sometimes is to cook the squash done with the onions until very soft...add a little flour and/or meal..maybe a beaten egg...form into patties and pan fry in hot oil. Mmmmm Mmmmm...Fried squash patties...Good eats!!

          Have Fun!

          1 Reply
          1. re: Uncle Bob

            If you grow them yourself it is easy to get more than you know what to do with. Cooked the way Uncle Bob describes above they freeze very well. Thaw them out, drain and make a squash casserole by mixing the squash with a dollop of sour cream, grated cheese, egg and cracker or bread crumbs.

            I like to take very young and tender squash and cut them up into bite size sticks and saute in oil or butter until just tender. Finish with butter and lemon.

            My mom used to toss them with cornmeal and pan fry with just a little oil. Kind of a fry/steam operation. Haven't had it that way in years. Need to make some because I will be leaving squash in unlocked cars in another week or two.

          2. If it's small, I just slice vertically and fry until golden in olive oil then sprinkle with salt--no need to peel.

            1. Another squash/pumpkin cooking question; can you cook/roast/bake the seeds & membrane and is it edible?

              2 Replies
              1. re: Iowaboy3

                Membrane? Never heard of that...I'd be hesitant to try it. Seeds? Yes...clean them off, then toss with salt/spices and bake. I'm sure you can find a recipe somewhere for them. I think they're also called Pepitas.

                1. re: Iowaboy3

                  I think you've shifted the topic from summer squashes, which don't have a stringy membrane, to the hard-shelled winter squashes. Yes, the seeds are edible once extracted from the membrane. These squash mostly need to be peeled, except for delicata squash.

                2. All good suggestions from other Ch'ers. I've sliced thin then brushed with oil, drizzled grated cheese and breadcrumbs and parsley, then baked. LOVE squash!