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Nakiri question.

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I've been looking a Nakiri knives and the Tojiro Nakiri at CKTG seems like a good price for a quality knife:
http://www.chefknivestogo.com/todpna1...

But also noticed that Williams Sonoma has a Shun for just under $100.00
http://www.williams-sonoma.com/produc...

The Shun is hollow-ground and unsure it that is a negative.. Sure is a good price for a Shun.

Does anyone on the forum use Nakiri's and if so any recommendations or thoughts on purchasing one appreciated.

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  1. A few of us use Nakiri from time to time. Usually, Tojiro knives are cheaper than Shun. In this case, it is $70 vs $100. I don't care for the hollow scooped out blade, but there is nothing wrong with it.

    The Shun knife on that page has a right handed handle. Keep this in mind.

    I think the two knives will be about the same, but the Tojiro is chepaer. The Shun will have slightly better handle and have better warranty.

    1 Reply
    1. re: Chemicalkinetics

      Thanks Chem. I think I will go the Tojiro.. Appreciate the reply.

    2. I have 2 Nakiris, and like both. One is an inexpensive no name from a Japanese grocery, with a rather thin simple blade. The other is a more typical Western construction with bolster and all; so it's heavier. Both have the slightly rounded tip, which is surprisingly useful when cutting meat. Both were around $20, so I can't comment on the value of the more expensive ones that you are looking at.

      3 Replies
      1. re: paulj

        <Both have the slightly rounded tip, which is surprisingly useful when cutting meat>

        Really? I thought most people consider that as a "minus", which is why many believe a Santoku having a pointed tip is more well-balanced.

        1. re: Chemicalkinetics

          It's hard to say why. The sharp tip is better for poking, but a sharp round edge feels better for the short slicing strokes that I use to separate skin from meat, or slicing along the lines between muscles. I keep a couple of santokus on the same knife rack. To a degree I use them interchangeably, but am more likely to grab a nakiri.

          1. re: paulj

            <The sharp tip is better for poking, but a sharp round edge feels better for the short slicing strokes that I use to separate skin from meat, or slicing along the lines between muscles.>

            Cool. Thanks for the explanation.

      2. I have the Tojiro DP nakiri but also this carbon steel nakiri:

        http://www.epicureanedge.com/shopexd....

        The carbon steel version is a really wonderful knife -- takes a very very sharp edge and holds it well. Costs about $100. But when I get the Tojiro nice and sharp I can't really tell much difference in practice. Maybe the carbon steel one is a bit sharper but at a certain point it hardly matters as far as I'm concerned.

         
         
        1. http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=...
          here is Alton Brown waving a Shun nakiri about
          and using it on a bell pepper
          http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=...

          http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nqUt-q...
          The Office clip - nakiri v usuba

          2 Replies
          1. re: paulj

            The Office clip is funny stuff.....LOL

            1. re: paulj

              Shun nakiri is a bit unusual in the sense that the Shun Pro Nakiri is more like an usuba than a nakiri:

              http://iweb.cooking.com/images/produc...