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steel knives - can i season them like a wok?

h
huoguofengzi May 22, 2012 05:48 AM

Ok, so this question may fall into the "are you kidding me?" category, but I've got to throw it out there anyway. I recently acquired some beautiful handmade steel knives (Uyghur knives, from northwestern China, a town called Yegesar - many spellings - for anyone familiar with China/Xinjiang). They are not stainless, and rust very easily. For the time being, I've wiped them dry and then with vegetable oil to avoid rusting. My question...well....let's call it a proposal: can I coat them with vegetable oil and then brown the oil over a flame - much in the way one would season a wok? Seems to me this might be a good way to keep them from rusting. Thoughts? Is this a terrible idea? Any other suggestions for dealing with this type of knife? I love the look and feel of the knives but don't relish the idea of having to make sure they are completely dry from minute to minute and coated with oil while not in use......Thanks in advance for any help! This is my second Chowhound post - I'm an American who's been living in China for about 8 years and I am happy to help with any China/Chinese cooking questions, especially when it comes to Chongqing/Sichuan food.

  1. mr_morcilla May 22, 2012 07:44 PM

    It's hard to say without knowing what type of steel is used. I have a set of carbon steel knives that will out-perform any clunky stainless-steel Wustoff or Henkels. I use them for almost everything except citrus. The main thing is to dry them right away after you wash them, and if you dry them in a rack, be sure the sides of the blade aren't touching anything. They will rust easily. When that happens, I just use a little cleanser (bar-keepers is good) and a scouring sponge. Be sure the knife is flat on its side on a towel, and on a hard surface. Extend the handle off the edge of the counter or cutting board when you scrub so no part of the side of the blade isn't flat on the surface, and scrub away! And NEVER put them in the dishwasher! They will never look like a stainless knife, though. They will develop uneven discoloration, and strange dark spots that make you wonder what they came in contact with.
    But they steel like a dream. When my old Sabatier slicing knife is really sharp, it will cut an over-ripe tomato into paper-thin slices.

    24 Replies
    1. re: mr_morcilla
      TraderJoe May 23, 2012 08:40 AM

      I have a set of carbon steel knives that will out-perform any clunky stainless-steel Wustoff or Henkels.
      ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

      I always find it interesting when I see people disparage Wusthof or German knives in general. They are still the back bone of most professional kitchens on a global scale. A good example of this is Justo the fish butcher who works for Eric Ripert.

      http://eatocracy.cnn.com/2011/02/25/t...

      A razor sharp knife is not the only attribute in professional cutlery and there's truly nothing clunk or unwieldy about German knives. Any one that fatigues from using them either needs to improve their knife skills of lift some weights.
      Flitz works a bit better for maintaining carbon knives than BKF as long as you have a source with fair prices.

      1. re: TraderJoe
        Chemicalkinetics May 23, 2012 02:04 PM

        <They are still the back bone of most professional kitchens on a global scale>

        I don't know. My understanding is that most American professional kitchen knives are stamped knives which are not as heavy nor thick as the top Wusthof and top Henckels knives. This is probably also why you read a lot of positive review on Victorinox stamped Chef's knife. Moreover, if we are truly talking about "global" scale as you have implied, then I am quiet certain that German chef's knife is not the back bone of the global professional kitchens.

        <Any one that fatigues from using them either needs to improve their knife skills of lift some weights.>

        Or they can use a different knife which they do not find fatigue.

        1. re: Chemicalkinetics
          TraderJoe May 23, 2012 02:18 PM

          "I am quiet certain that German chef's knife is not the back bone of the global professional kitchens"

          Perhaps I should have said after many years as a Professional Chef that has been my observation. Clearly your experience is different than mine but I've seen those German knives in use on multiple continents and far more SS than carbon.
          If they are good enough for Eric Riperts staff I think most home cooks will be fine with German SS knives.
          The only reason stamped knives like Victorinox, Sani-Safe, Dexter etc get a lot of use in a commercial setting as house knives is because they are disposable, inexpensive or they are rented from a knife vendor.
          It's a fallacy to think a lighter knife is universally better. If that were true we'd all be using lasers but they have limited use in a professional kitchen and the current trend is backing away from the ultra thin blades.

          1. re: TraderJoe
            Chemicalkinetics May 23, 2012 02:41 PM

            <Perhaps I should have said after many years as a Professional Chef that has been my observation.>

            If we consider "global" as in the entire world/globe, then we need to appreciate that much of the world population is gravitate toward Asia. The Indian, Chinese, Japanese....etc... It is difficult for me to imagine that these people all use German style chef's knives as their main knives. Let's also not forget that the French alone do not use the German style Chef's knives. They use French style Chef's knives. At the end, my guess is that many more people use Chinese cleavers than German steel Chef's knives. For example, do you know significantly more people speak Chinese as their primary language than people speak English?

            http://geography.about.com/od/culturalgeography/a/10languages.htm

            http://www.infoplease.com/ipa/A077527...

            <think most home cooks will be fine with German SS knives. >

            Agree.

            <The only reason stamped knives like Victorinox, Sani-Safe, Dexter etc get a lot of use in a commercial setting as house knives is because they are disposable, inexpensive>

            I agree, but still, this means the German made knives are not the most popular knives among professional chefs. This is like aluminum cookware are the most popular cookware in professional kitchens. Yes, they can be seen as disposable and inexpensive, but they are nevertheless the true backbone of professional cookware.

            <It's a fallacy to think a lighter knife is universally better. >

            I agree. I was just debating with you on the technical points, not the larger points. :)

            1. re: Chemicalkinetics
              TraderJoe May 23, 2012 03:06 PM

              this means the German made knives are not the most popular knives among professional chefs.
              -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
              No sir. It means they are not as popular among bean counters and managers. Sorry to niggle but it's really not like cookware at all.

              "If you consider global as in the entire world, then we need to appreciate that much of the world population is gravitate toward Asia"
              -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
              Agreed but Asia is still only one continent out of how many?

              "Let's also not forget that the French alone do not use the German style Chef's knives"
              --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
              That's painting with a mighty broad brush.
              I would however consider pretty much all of the Euro knives on a fairly equal playing field especially in the context of a comparison to J-knives.
              The bottom lines is that the German/Euro knives are standard fare on multiple Continents as they are readily available. Far more so than Japanese knives. Even those in Oz and the UK still have to go top considerable effort to purchase a J-knife while German/Euro knives are standard fare.

              1. re: TraderJoe
                Chemicalkinetics May 23, 2012 03:18 PM

                < It means they are not as popular among bean counters and managers>

                So what is the definition of popular now?

                <Sorry to niggle but it's really not like cookware at all.>

                Why not? Don't people use pure aluminum cookware because they are cheap and easy to replace? The managers bought the aluminum cookware

                <Agreed but Asia is still only one continent out of how many?>

                It does not matter as long as we are talking about popular and population, just like the fact that Chinese is the most popular language, and not English. Yes, English is spoken on more continents and more countries, but that does not change the fact that Chinese language is the more popular. You can think of this like US election. The popular vote is by the number of people, not by the number of states or cities. Remember that we are discussing if "They are still the back bone of most professional kitchens on a global scale.", so we are counting by the numbers of kitchens. My guess is that they are not the backbone of MOST professional kitchens on a global scale. The raw numbers of Chinese, Japanese, Indian ...etc restaurants in the globe alone would have overwhelmed the statistic.

                <I would however consider pretty much all of the Euro knives on a fairly equal playing field especially in the context of a comparison to J-knives.>

                Yes, but that will be a different topic. We were not talking about Japanese knives. We were, if anything, talking about French knives. Mr. Morcilla stated that he found the thinner Sabatier French knife to be better than the thicker and heavier German made knives:

                "...But they steel like a dream. When my old Sabatier slicing knife is really sharp,"

                and then you replied that

                "I always find it interesting when I see people disparage Wusthof or German knives in general. They are still the back bone of most professional kitchens on a global scale. "

                So my understanding is that you have replied with the footing that a French Chef's knife is not the same as a German Chef's knife.

                1. re: Chemicalkinetics
                  TraderJoe May 23, 2012 03:42 PM

                  The original reason that this discussion started is that Mr. Morcilla stated that he found the thinner Sabatier French Chef's knife to be way better than the thicker and heavier German made knives:
                  -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                  That's odd. I thought I was responding to the statement " I have a set of carbon steel knives that will out-perform any clunky stainless-steel Wustoff or Henkels"
                  I didn't see any mention of Sabatier in that sentence. Either way I stand corrected.
                  No one in France uses a German knife.
                  For real.
                  Your free to guess all you like. It won't change my experience or my opinion. ;-D

                  1. re: TraderJoe
                    Chemicalkinetics May 23, 2012 04:41 PM

                    :)

                    <That's odd. I thought I was responding to the statement...I didn't see any mention of Sabatier in that sentence>

                    Yes, but he mentioned later that those are Sabatier knives. He also said that they "steel like a dream". People won't steel Japanese knives.

                    <No one in France uses a German knife>

                    When I wrote French do not use German knives, it was in a generalization tone. That is to say "most" do not, not "none" do not. Kinda of like people say the Chinese do not bake. I am sure that there are plenty Chinese who do bake, but most do not.

                    <It won't change my experience >

                    Our experience can be biased. For example, in your experience, you probably have met more chefs speak in English than in Chinese, but it does not mean globally there are more English speaking chefs than Chinese speaking chefs. :)

                    :D

                    1. re: Chemicalkinetics
                      TraderJoe May 23, 2012 05:20 PM

                      Yes, but he mentioned later that those are Sabatier knives
                      --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                      Really? I saw the mention of a singular sabatier slicing knife at the end of his post. I didn't make the connection that every carbon knife he may own or use was a Sabatier.
                      My bad.
                      My experience is absolutely biased, It's based on what I've seen and I certainly haven't seen it all. I've never been to China but I wok every day.
                      ;-D

                      1. re: TraderJoe
                        Chemicalkinetics May 23, 2012 05:29 PM

                        < I didn't make the connection that every carbon knife he may own or use was a Sabatier.>

                        We should ask :)

                        <I've never been to China but I wok every day. >

                        Hey, I work everyday too.

                        :)

                        1. re: Chemicalkinetics
                          o
                          OldGringo May 23, 2012 11:43 PM

                          OK, can't let this go by. You guys may be talking apples and oranges here. You are leaving several things out of consideration. First, in today's commercial kitchens there is a large status factor when purchasing knives (similiar to which school/institute you attended) chefs love to look down their nose at one another. Also most chefs are required to purchase and use their own knives, thus price becomes the best you can afford. IMHO, and many others agree, I'm sure that Japanese knives are the envy of many a kitchen slave. However, not many of us are at the level of a internationally known TV star so the astronomical prices are far above our desires. Hence sales figures of German and other moderatly priced work tools become more attractive to every day working men. I was a chef for many years in many countries world wide so have strong views on this. I have spent awhile in Japan, You will not find a chef or cook in Japan who will use a ss knife, tho' some companies do offer them to western markets, and the Japanese cusines require a level of knife skills far above a Euro/American education. I am sixty-nine years old and many years retired but still own several thousand dollars worth of knives and the best by far is a Sabatier that I bought in Australia in 1963 and have used all over the world. It is a carbon steel knife that has been abused any way you can imagne and still takes an edge easliy and tho' it's 12 inches long can be used for any job needed. Knives are the tools needed to do your job,think Craftsman verses Snap-on. Buy the best you can afford and what works best for you to get the job done today. Be results driven, not status.

                          1. re: OldGringo
                            Eiron May 24, 2012 10:28 AM

                            "Be results driven, not status."

                            Jeez, you're gonna take all the fun right out of it, aren't you?

                            ;-)

                            1. re: OldGringo
                              Chemicalkinetics May 24, 2012 10:11 PM

                              <I'm sure that Japanese knives are the envy of many a kitchen slave>

                              I don't think Japanese knives have to be more expensive than German knives -- if we are talking about Henckels and Wusthof.

                              <I am sixty-nine years old and many years retired but still own several thousand dollars worth of knives and the best by far is a Sabatier >

                              :) Another French knife lover. You hear that TradeeJoe :P

                              All I was teasing TraderJoe was his original statement of "They [German knives] are still the back bone of most professional kitchens on a global scale"

                              I bet more professional kitchens use Chinese cleavers than German chef's knives -- just because they are tons of Chinese on this planet.

                              By the way, OldGringo, I love TraderJoe. We were just teasing each others, not arguing over anything.

                              1. re: Chemicalkinetics
                                TraderJoe May 25, 2012 06:34 AM

                                Knife knutz. We truly are a special breed.
                                OldGringo if you ever want to sell that Sabatier let me know. I've never owned one but I really like the history and would like to pick one up in the future.

                                1. re: TraderJoe
                                  Chemicalkinetics May 25, 2012 08:59 AM

                                  Trader,

                                  I hope you know I tease you because I feel like that I know you very well. :)

                                  1. re: Chemicalkinetics
                                    TraderJoe May 25, 2012 09:15 AM

                                    Not to worry my friend I was laffin the whole time and know it's all in good fun. ;)

                              2. re: OldGringo
                                j
                                JavaBean May 25, 2012 12:05 PM

                                “Buy the best you can afford and what works best for you to get the job done today.”

                                True Dat, OldGringo…at the end of the day that’s all that matters.

                                I’m not a pro, but like Chemicalkinetics , I too would wager that the most prevalent style of chef’s knife (worldwide) is an Asian / Chinese cleaver b/c over 60% percent of the worlds population is Asian. Try imagining the crowd at Times Square –during New Years plus a gazillion.

                                In the U.S., I would say it’s a German-style chef’s knife. I believe Sabatier, Henckel and Wusthof were once the big 3 knife brands in the U.S. Sometime after Sabatier lost its’ identity (late 60’s / early 70’s ?), Henckel and Wusthof dominated and monopolized the U.S. market, and dictated that knives needed to be stout, have a thick, heavy and pliable blade, a big honking finger bolster, a forged vs. stamped blade, a full vs. partial tang, be stainless / dishwasher safe, etc. Without any real competition, they took the “it ain’t broke so don’t fix it” approach and tor years (or decades) produced “new” models with their "Golden Goose" formula == regurgitated the same (or similar) blade shape and blade steel with a different handle, whilst average consumers (like me) “drank the Kool-Aid”. Until Global and later on Shun began offering Western style knives with Japanese steel to the US market (sometime in the late 1990’s), a German-style chef’s knife made by Wusthof or Henckel was the only option.

                                “I think most home cooks will be fine with German SS knives.”
                                I think so as well, but I wonder what would have happened if Sabatier remained competitive during the German haydays. I think part of the reason why vintage Sabs are sought after may have to do with Sabs’ carbon steel blades were better than the Germans’ SS blades, and a preference for their flatter French-style blade over the more rounded German style blade.

                                1. re: JavaBean
                                  TraderJoe May 25, 2012 01:02 PM

                                  I too would wager that the most prevalent style of chef’s knife (worldwide) is an Asian / Chinese cleaver b/c over 60% percent of the worlds population is Asian

                                  ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                                  That may well be true but that's really a very different topic from what I posted. I was referring to knives used by professional Chefs not how many knives of a particular style exist based on population.

                                  There's an awful lot of santokus in use today but they are not all that popular in a professional setting. I doubt your going to find a lot of them in use by Japanese Chef's.

                                  There's probably a jazillion of them in Japanese homes let alone in homes world wide so popularity and professional use are not always the same.

                                  I remember buying Globals in the early 90's. They were truly a big deal at the time but the spine on my Global gyuto was nearly as thick as my Wusthof.

                                  1. re: TraderJoe
                                    Chemicalkinetics May 25, 2012 01:04 PM

                                    <I was referring to knives used by professional Chefs ...>

                                    Yes, but don't you think professional Chefs in China use Chinese cleavers? I don't think they use German knives. The Japanese Chefs also lean toward non-German knives. I was told by Koreans and Mongolian that they too use knives which look like Chinese cleavers. Indians do not use Chinese cleavers, but those knives do not look like German chef's knives to me. A bit different.

                                    If you count around, it is just too difficult for German style Chef's knife to contribute as the back bone of the global professional kitchens -- which would have to be 50% or more.

                                    1. re: TraderJoe
                                      j
                                      JavaBean May 25, 2012 02:01 PM

                                      I'm not a pro and maybe wrong, but the way I see it...Asia has to feed 60% of mouths in the world. So there's  likely more pro chef's there than anywhere else, ,preparing Asian cuisines with a cleaver.   Fwiw, i was there, last year and stopped by the restaurant supply district.  I saw alot of stores with walls and walls of cleavers in various shapes and sizes, and a couple of j-knives scatter about.   The only place that had a German blade was a department store.

                                      Yes, the pro j-chef's that I've meet don't do Santokus.  It's  popular in Japan's tiny kitchens, but they have no idea why westerners with big kitchens use them.

                                      1. re: JavaBean
                                        cowboyardee May 25, 2012 02:14 PM

                                        "Yes, the pro j-chef's that I've meet don't do Santokus. It's popular in Japan's tiny kitchens, but they have no idea why westerners with big kitchens use them."
                                        ________
                                        I think they're popular with home cooks especially because they're short, light, and easy to control. That can be nice when you're working on a small cutting board (as many homecooks do) or have iffy knife skills (again, as many homecooks do). Personally I think there are enough advantages of a gyuto or chefs knife (or chinese cleaver) that pros tend to choose longer blades.

                                        One interesting thing about the popularity of different knives among pro cooks in America is that when I watch professional cooking competitions on TV (Top Chef, Chopped, etc), many of the contestants are using gyutos of one sort or another. The Misono ux10 series seems especially popular, but I've also noticed a decent number of masamotos and macs and hattoris and even the odd hiromoto, etc. This is among Western cooks. But at the same time, I sharpen enough knives for professionals and am friendly with enough professionals that i know that gyutos still aren't super common in American pro kitchens, and that when you do see Japanese knives it's often a Global or Shun. I have a hard time imagining that Hattori is actively sponsoring Western cooks on TV, so I'm not really sure why so many of em are using the kinds of gyutos that are popular among us internet knife knuts. Maybe they look good on camera? Or maybe they're more popular in Western fine dining (which kind of makes sense, since Western fine dining seems to have been fairly influenced by Japanese plating techniques - often relying on precision knife work - over the last few decades)? Or maybe they're more popular among head chefs and chef-owners than they are among the average line cook? Who knows.

                                        1. re: cowboyardee
                                          Chemicalkinetics May 25, 2012 02:19 PM

                                          <I think they're popular with home cooks especially because they're short, light, and easy to control.>

                                          For a second, I thought you mean...I think they're popular with home cooks especially because home cooks are short, light and easy to control. :D

                                          <so I'm not really sure why so many of em are using the kinds of gyutos that are popular among us internet knife knuts.>

                                          I think these top chef guys tend to pay attention to the US knife community more and get influenced by them. Or they pay attention to Japanese chefs who do not use Shun, Global, but rather Misono UX10 and Masamoto...etc.

                                          1. re: cowboyardee
                                            TraderJoe May 27, 2012 01:36 PM

                                            maybe they're more popular among head chefs and chef-owners than they are among the average line cook?

                                            ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                                            No maybe about it. The average line cook simply can't afford those tools which is why German knives still have such a large commercial presence among those who buy their own tools. An even smaller fraction of the % that does own the higher end J-knives takes them to work as daily drivers out of fear of theft.

                                          2. re: JavaBean
                                            TraderJoe May 27, 2012 02:07 PM

                                            Asia has to feed 60% of mouths in the world. So there's likely more pro chef's there than anywhere else, ,preparing Asian cuisines with a cleaver.
                                            ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                            China represents less than 33% of Asia and has tiny percentage of commercial kitchens in relation to their population. Based on that I think your numbers are probably a bit off.
                                            As far as German knives dominating they have a very strong presence in ;
                                            North America
                                            Australia,
                                            Africa and
                                            Europe

                                            Not so much with the Chinese cleaver. If we considered ALL cleavers then you might have a valid point but that's a different conversation.
                                            I speak to many other Chefs that end up using Wusthof not so much by choice but simply because that is all they have available to them in other countries. So that German dominance is still there. Yes they use German knives in France as well as others. One of the largest Masamoto dealers out side of Japan is in Paris.

                                            <Yes, the pro j-chef's that I've meet don't do Santokus>

                                            There's a reason for that and it's the same reason you won't see them in use in many professional kitchens here. However if your theory about the cleaver was true then the the Santoku would be the most popular knife in Japan as it very likely has the highest production of any style of knife in that country. Just because a knife style is popular with a given population it does not always translate to commercial use.

              2. Chemicalkinetics May 22, 2012 04:50 PM

                Like everyone said, you can form a patina (forced or not), and that patina surface will protect much of the knife from futher rusting. However, you cannot/should not seasong the knife like a cookware.

                1. b
                  bkling May 22, 2012 10:35 AM

                  I'd love to see photos of these knives if you're able to post any.

                  10 Replies
                  1. re: bkling
                    h
                    huoguofengzi May 23, 2012 02:50 AM

                    Hi - Here you go. I used paper towel and vinegar to force the patina yesterday. I think they're very good-looking knives. The wood is apricot (or almond? the word is actually the same in Chinese). The steel is from truck/train springs - not sure which, not being a mechanic, but I saw the round springs that are used as raw material.

                     
                    1. re: huoguofengzi
                      Chemicalkinetics May 23, 2012 12:19 PM

                      These knives look strange. :)

                      1. re: huoguofengzi
                        j
                        JavaBean May 23, 2012 12:42 PM

                        Thanks for posting the pics. Is there a functional reason for the part on top of the forward portion of the cleaver, and the " }" shaped cut out. I've never seen anything like it.

                        1. re: JavaBean
                          Chemicalkinetics May 23, 2012 12:46 PM

                          <Is there a functional reason for the part on top of the forward portion of the cleaver>

                          I can see it for softening meat, like a meat hammer. In other words, you can flip the knife and use the other end to hammer meat. This end won't be really sharp.

                          1. re: JavaBean
                            h
                            huoguofengzi May 23, 2012 09:04 PM

                            Actually, it's a sort of mini blade that seems like it could be used for fine-tuned work - peeling, perhaps, ir shaving thin layer off of a vegetable. Haven't used it much yet, but I think it's pretty cool.

                            1. re: huoguofengzi
                              h
                              huoguofengzi May 23, 2012 09:31 PM

                              As for the shape of the top end of the cleaver, I think it's just decorative, although it's possible there's some function I'm not aware of. I'll have to ask when I visit again this summer. They eat a lot of goat/mutton out there, so it wouldn't surprise me if the cleaver is especially useful for dealing with this type of meat, fat and bone.

                              1. re: huoguofengzi
                                SanityRemoved May 26, 2012 09:27 AM

                                It could be used to reinforce the proper use of curly brackets ;)

                          2. re: huoguofengzi
                            b
                            bkling May 23, 2012 02:16 PM

                            Fascinating pics. I'm no expert but their shapes seem to show a middle eastern/persian influence, as you'd expect from a Uigur region.

                            1. re: bkling
                              h
                              huoguofengzi May 23, 2012 09:19 PM

                              Yup, Xinjiang Province, especially the areas in the far west, bordering the -stans are currently part of China, but have been split up as parts of many empires over time and share at least as much with Central Asia, ethnically, culturally, linguistically, and in all things culinary too. The town of Yegesar (Yingisar, Yengesar, in Chinese Shache - so many different versions/spellings of the place name) has been famous for it's knives for hundreds of years. The town was once the capital of a Uyghur kingdom (these ethnic labels get messy here, but that's a story for another forum) and an important Silk Road trading post, so goods (and aesthetic influences, not to mention religion, food, art, etc.) from far and wide passed through.

                              1. re: bkling
                                h
                                huoguofengzi May 23, 2012 09:28 PM

                                One more thing---just because I'm kind of happy people are interested ;-) The inscription is Uyghur, and reads "Yengisar", the name of the town.

                          3. j
                            JavaBean May 22, 2012 08:50 AM

                            Hi. I’ve never tried it, but I’d be leery about the possibility of screwing up the knife’ tempering. As mentioned, a patina formed naturally overtime or forced with mustard, household vinegar, etc. will help inhibit the rust and reactiveness to acid foods.

                            1 Reply
                            1. re: JavaBean
                              h
                              huoguofengzi May 22, 2012 09:22 AM

                              Thanks JavaBean & Trader JIm. It hadn't occurred to me that the knives might warp. I still am curious....but I don't want to risk messing up these knives. Maybe I'll try the experiment with something less special sometime....

                            2. TraderJoe May 22, 2012 08:45 AM

                              Adding to what Jim said about forcing a paina if you have the patience you may be able to polish them to a mirror finish but no I wouldn't try to season them with heat as they would likely warp.

                              1. k
                                knifesavers May 22, 2012 06:25 AM

                                Google up "forcing a patina" and see what folks do to expedite the darkening of a carbon steel knife.

                                I find cutting up a cooked chicken causes a darn near immediate darkening.

                                Once it develops a patina it if much more rust resistant.

                                Jim

                                1 Reply
                                1. re: knifesavers
                                  h
                                  huoguofengzi May 22, 2012 09:20 AM

                                  Thanks, I've got them wrapped in some vinegar soaked cloths as I write this. It's hard to get complete coverage, but looks like it's working so far.

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