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But you'll love it the way I cook it!

Also known as "I hate vegetable xxxxxxxxxx" and someone responds with "You'll love it the way that I make it!" So working from the list of vegetables chosen at the earlier posting http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/849667 what is the recipe that you think will turn a hater into a lover? Mine is for those who hate brussels sprouts: shred them raw with a sharp knife or mandoline and then stir fry with bacon/pancetta, pine nuts and garlic with olive oil, s&p until tender. Squeeze of lemon juice can't hurt.

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  1. take several large zucchini ( preferably given to one for free from friends overplanted garden), shred them on the large holes of a grater, salt them, put them in a colander and let them drain,press the water out with your hands, pour them directly on an open sports section of the sunday Times, wrap them carefully and place them directly in the compost heap as that is all they are good for.

    then order pizza from your favorite place and consume immediately with beer.

    14 Replies
    1. re: hyde

      And here I thought for a second you were making fritters.....@_@......:-)

      1. re: hyde

        I was not a big fan of zucchini until we started getting the smallest we could find (not miniature,) then slicing them vertically and frying in olive oil until nice and brown. With just a sprinkle of salt they are sweet and nutty all by the themselves--and great tossed with penne and Parmigiano.

        1. re: escondido123

          I would like them too like that, except perhaps for the Parmigiano, although I think I am actually getting used to the latter.

          1. re: RUK

            You can certainly use another grating cheese, or goat cheese, or not cheese at all.

            1. re: RUK

              Grana Padano is a cheese that many Italians use as a substitute for Parmisan Reggiano, i.e., one might call it an everyday cheese, or house cheese, or table cheese. Actually I like it most of the time better than Parm Regg. Not as strong tasting.

            2. re: escondido123

              This is how I do my zukes too, and I also buy the smallest available - I find them better than the larger more waterlogged ones. (Is it weird that I really prefer yellow ones to green? :)

              1. re: megjp

                I did a taste test last week, thinking I would like the yellow better--but with my eyes closed I found the green had more flavor and were a little sweeter.

                1. re: escondido123

                  I'm sure it's psychological: yellow vegetables that aren't corn are so rare!

                2. re: megjp

                  megjp, I've never understood why people get so jacked up sideways about those extra huge zukes that are supposedly so wonderful stuffed with ground beef. to me they're only being used as a vessel for the beef, don't really think anyone eats the big fat zuke ;:-/

                  1. re: iL Divo

                    The first time I ever ate a baked big fat zuke was in a French restaurant in Seattle in the 70's. It was stuffed with pork, however. Pork not being my favorite meat, but I loved it. I tried making it myself, but it never was delicious.

                3. re: escondido123

                  I do the same but add some red pepper flakes.

                4. re: hyde

                  I almost swallowed my gum! Thumbs up

                    1. re: hyde

                      hyde....................speaking of compost piles/bins/heaps could you please come churn mine, thanks :)

                    2. Nothing like a buzzkill for a first post....

                      Baby spinach, *very* lightly sauteed in olive oil and crushed garlic. Even the most ardent spinach-haters will eat it!

                      18 Replies
                      1. re: sunshine842

                        jeez, just a little humor. the site is so EARNEST all the time.

                        that said, roasting any of the root vegetables (celery root, parsnips, carrots, shallots, rutabaga) at fairly high heat after tossing them with vermouth and butter, s&p, completely changes their nature and you can even sell them to kids.

                        1. re: hyde

                          Grow a whole garden of eggplant and keep taking it down to all the soup kitchens and food pantries. You would probably get accolades heaped upon you. Little would they know that you don't like eggplant or poor people. :-) :-)

                          1. re: Hank Hanover

                            HH...............they'd be right! < about the eggplant................hahahahahhah

                          2. re: hyde

                            Vermouth, hey? Must try, once I turn on my oven again in the fall.

                            1. re: hyde

                              You know what else that works well with?
                              Zucchini!
                              Grilling too.

                              1. re: hyde

                                Hyde, I agree! I thought your post was funny. On another note, I've never used Vermouth for anything except martinis! What does it do for vegetables? I'd love to expand my Vermouth repertoire.

                                1. re: Tehama

                                  I read somewhere here on chowhound that that person keeps a bottle beside the stove for cooking. I bought a bottle, but I've yet to use it but once. I'm wondering if I should 'put it in the cupboard.'

                                  1. re: Rella

                                    I certainly keep a bottle on hand for a quick deglaze.

                                    1. re: LauraGrace

                                      Ah ha! thanks LauraGrace. I hope I can remember that. I like that idea.

                                    2. re: Rella

                                      mine has always been kept in the liquor cabinet under the wet bar with other alcohol.
                                      finally I used the last of the white vermouth in the French Onion soup I was craving after buying the largest bag ever of onions. delish, gave a little spark to the broth.

                                    3. re: Tehama

                                      I'm not a wine drinker, but I always keep a bottle of vermouth for any recipe that asks for white wine. It's quick and easy, and adds a depth of flavor that otherwise I wouldn't get in my food. And it won't go bad like a bottle of opened wine.

                                    4. re: hyde

                                      just to let you know hyde, you will NEVER EVER IN YOUR LIFE get this adult or kid [me] to eat or come anywhere near a rutabaga...................they are nasty smelly disgusting things that come straight from the devil himself....................blechhhhhhhhhhhhhh

                                      1. re: iL Divo

                                        Oh, my, how can you say that! Nothing better from the devil has been given to us. Just a little salt, maybe a little good butter - Loving it! :-))

                                        1. re: iL Divo

                                          fair enough. full disclosure, im not really much of a veggie guy but i will eat the roasted root vegetables. celery root and cauliflower are completely changed by an hour in a 400 degree oven ( or currently if you live in the midwest you could put them on your back porch and they will be roasted in four hours or so)..

                                          my sister lives in st louis and just sent me a picture of the thermometer on her back porch. it says 108.

                                          that is messed up.

                                      2. re: sunshine842

                                        Agree. I hate cooked spinach but this is good.

                                        1. re: tim irvine

                                          when we were first married I knew my husband liked cooked spinach as his mom often made it. but at our house, we ate it seldom and when we did, it was squeezed dry from frozen, sauteed in pan with butter salt and pepper plus a tsp of vinegar and finished at the end with Parmesan cheese. hubby liked it still his moms way or mine now.

                                        2. re: sunshine842

                                          With a pinch of red pepper flakes and a bare sprinkle of a mild vinegar.

                                          1. re: sunshine842

                                            boy you're right about VERY little salt as I've brought home the cute box of baby spinach, the see thru box in the specialty section, only to ruin it with just a tad over on the salt, then it's gotta be dumped. there's $5 down the drain and now what's the veg for the meal?

                                            I liked his/her buzzkill and read it because for a second I was envisioning the outcome of this new fabulous veg recipe, but he/she then got me........................hahah

                                          2. Slice zucchini in half, scoop out center, and fill with cream cheese. Top with tomato sauce, chopped parsley, and a sprinkle of grated mozzarella.

                                            1 Reply
                                            1. Okra ~~~ Cooked in Gumbo ~~ By the time the Gumbo is done...you'll never know it was there....and you'll slurp down two big bowls!! :)

                                              19 Replies
                                              1. re: Uncle Bob

                                                Take it from a confirmed okra-phobe. I'll still know it's there . I also understand that gumbo by definition has okra, so I absolutely don't object to its presence and I don't expect anyone to make it okraless. I just don't order gumbo.

                                                1. re: Cliocooks

                                                  "I also understand that gumbo by definition has okra"

                                                  Not necessarily..........Some do.....Some don't.

                                                  1. re: Uncle Bob

                                                    Mine doesn't, but only because I'm living with a pathetic bunch of okra haters.If I really needed a pot of gumbo just for myself, it would include okra.

                                                    Oh, and people who hate okra should just dust it in cornmeal and deep fry it. Deep-frying anything (except brussels sprouts, which are inedible) can make it taste good.

                                                    1. re: Isolda

                                                      I've been hearing "it's good fried" ever since I can remember; sorry, but it just doesn't work for me.

                                                      1. re: Cliocooks

                                                        This is the recipe that won me over to the okra side. No attempt to disguise it however also no trace of slime or other okra-phobe triggers. I add slivered jalapenos to the recipe.

                                                        http://www.thebittenword.com/thebitte...

                                                        1. re: Cliocooks

                                                          Try it pickled! Crunchy and not slimy at all. Talk O Texas hot okra pickles are my favorite.

                                                          1. re: LisaPA

                                                            yes! this is the best way to eat Okra! I bought some for a bloody mary and now I can't stop snacking on them!

                                                            1. re: iheartcooking

                                                              Let me join the chorus of pickled okra! Yummm, yum, yum! Doesn't even taste like okra (which I like fried or in gumbo, but not too crazy about on their own).

                                                              1. re: Tehama

                                                                Isn't there a way to ' de-slime' okra? Adding vinegar to it or something?

                                                      2. re: Uncle Bob

                                                        the few and only times I've ever had gumbo, it's been in there.
                                                        I'd find it odd if it went missing.
                                                        doesn't bother me at all and it's does sort of fade out in the distance.

                                                      3. re: Cliocooks

                                                        We make Gumbo without Okra. There, I said it and I expect all self respecting Gumbo experts to start the scoffing. Go ahead slime fans,.mock away :).

                                                        p.s. Gumbo without Okra is amazing.

                                                      4. re: Uncle Bob

                                                        Fried down with the roux and others vegs. and agree with "by definition" - regional. http://www.thefreedictionary.com/_/di...

                                                        1. re: CocoaNut

                                                          I'm not certain, but I think the name "gumbo" actually derives from a name for okra. I can't remember which African language it comes from.

                                                          1. re: Cliocooks

                                                            Yes, it does, but gumbo(the dish) has as many iterations as it has cooks. Roux-based gumbo, usually (not always) does not contain okra. Distinctions are often made between Creole/Cajun gumbo with the former typically containing okra and tomato. I make a cajun-style gumbo based on a Paul Prudhomme recipe that contains no okra, no tomato.

                                                            The lines are often crossed, distinctions blurred. But you can certainly find delicious gumbo with or without okra. It does not, by definition, contain okra.

                                                            1. re: nomadchowwoman

                                                              Mmmmmm no Okra, no tomato, dark roux....My favorite!!!!

                                                            2. re: Cliocooks

                                                              That's certainly one popular 'story'! ~~ Another one, just as credible, is that the name comes from the Choctaw Indian word for Sassafras....The leaves ground into a powder (File) to thicken soups, etc.... An old trick the Choctaws taught the very earliest/first French explorers.. ...LaSalle and his merry band of soup lovers upon arriving in the lower Mississippi Valley... Oh..The Choctaw word for Sassafras? ~~ Kombo

                                                              1. re: Uncle Bob

                                                                and the French word for okra? Gomba.

                                                                Interesting stuff, this language thing.

                                                              2. re: Cliocooks

                                                                Yep, they always said okra puts the "gum" in gumbo!

                                                          2. Beets: it's not how I cook them (boiled 15 minutes, add pinchy salt), but the varietal and time of picking. The itty bitty early beets are way better than late beets -- so sweet and flavorful and tender!

                                                            41 Replies
                                                            1. re: Chowrin

                                                              Also, do the beet greens together with the beets.
                                                              Who likes beet greens but not beets? anyone?

                                                              1. re: Chowrin

                                                                I can tolerate the yellow beets when I peel them raw, slice and fry until dark golden in olive oil. Sprinkle with salt, eat hot.

                                                                1. re: escondido123

                                                                  Golden beets are delicious in this soup: http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/foo...

                                                                  Otherwise, I thought I disliked red beets my entire life -- it turns out I just dislike the Bick's or whatever pickled beets -- but what changed my mind was a Bittman idea:

                                                                  - Steam 6 small (or equivalent large) beets while whole, until easily pierced with knife
                                                                  - Peel/rub away skins, slice/chop, and toss in prepared dressing & serve warm.
                                                                  - Dressing is an emulsion of 1/2t. each S&P, 1t. cumin, juice of 1 lemon, 1t. garlic powder/minced clove garlic, and >2T. EVOO.

                                                                  1. re: megjp

                                                                    I'll have to try this sometime. I have had red beets done other ways than jarred/preserved/pickled ect and still hated them. I'd give them one more chance if they were done something similar to this.

                                                                  2. re: escondido123

                                                                    Why doesn't anyone on the East coast regularly sell yellow beets? In Seattle they were everywhere but here only the red kind.

                                                                    1. re: melpy

                                                                      I'm not sure if I'm 'east coast," however, I do see yellow beets in my local Winchester, VA, supermarket; not as common to see as the all-the-time red beets, but they are often there.

                                                                      1. re: melpy

                                                                        I'm sort of far west to be considered east-coast but I only see them at intervals and have made mental (or physical) note of stores/greengrocers that often carry them.

                                                                        Independent places, like greengrocers or health food places, are the best bet in my area. Good luck!

                                                                    2. re: Chowrin

                                                                      I will eat beet greens (not my favorite green, but they're fine) - however, I detest beets themselves. They taste like sweet dirt. Totally foul.

                                                                      1. re: biondanonima

                                                                        Me too, neither. I've tried beets made just about every possible way, from fresh, frozen, and canned, in restaurants and in private homes....and I just don't like them. I have finally reached a point where I am no longer apologetic about it -- I have tried them again and again and again -- and I still would let my stomach growl for a very long time before I was hungry enough to eat one by my own choice.

                                                                        I will eat them if etiquette means I can't gracefully get out of it...but I will get out of it any chance I get.

                                                                        1. re: sunshine842

                                                                          Yesterday I noticed at Costco a mason-type jar filled with beets and whatever else ingredients; ingredients included lots of sugar, IMO; beet and cane sugar. Some can only appreciate beets with a lot of sugar - similar to those big jars of 3-bean salad. You've probably tried something similar under the name of "pickled beets." I used to love them - but now I limit sugar, so I don't eat them.

                                                                          1. re: Rella

                                                                            I have had beets prepared just about any way you could think of, from just about any source you could think of, on two continents.

                                                                            I don't like them.

                                                                            1. re: Rella

                                                                              My mother always made pickled eggs and beets for Easter when I was a kid - a big Mason jar with beets and hard boiled eggs in a pickling solution that contained vinegar, sugar, water and lots of beet juice. I loved the eggs as a kid and still do (despite the beet juice permeating them), but I cannot STAND the beets.

                                                                              1. re: biondanonima

                                                                                And I cannot STAND the eggs in that scenario. We would make a good pair at the table for this dish. All gone!

                                                                                1. re: biondanonima

                                                                                  My ex asked if I knew how to make pickled eggs. Yes, I told him, I do -- so out I went, and bought a jar of pickled beets.

                                                                                  Fished all the beets out and threw them away (he didn't like beets, either) -- boiled the eggs, and put them in the beet juice, like I'd seen my grandmother do dozens of times.

                                                                                  A couple of days later, he returned from a business trip, and I trotted out my jar of rosy pickled eggs.

                                                                                  THEY'RE PINK! Who the hell eats pink pickled eggs!!!

                                                                                  So the pink eggs went in the trash, too...and I never made pickled eggs again -- I still don't know how to make them any other way.

                                                                                  1. re: sunshine842

                                                                                    Of course they're pink! That's why they're a special Easter treat - they're so pretty! A friend of mine served them this year at Easter but to fancy them up she deviled the yolks, which I had never thought to do myself - but I will from now on, they were AMAZING!

                                                                                    Anyway, if you don't want pink pickled eggs, just make a simple pickling solution of white vinegar, sugar, salt and whatever spices you like (all-purpose pickling spice is fine). But how boring. They're so much better when they're pink!

                                                                                    1. re: biondanonima

                                                                                      I don't like pickled eggs anyway -- and the key reference to the ex is the word 'ex' --- so I'll pass, but thanks.

                                                                                  2. re: biondanonima

                                                                                    That dish made it take years for me to learn to like beets -- I loathe vinegar, and even when beets had none on them, I had an instinctual oh-god-no-yuck reaction to them because I expected pickled beets. (Eggs I had lots of other times; my dad doesn't like beets at all, so my mom only made the Easter dish for tradition's sake and we never had them in the house otherwise.)

                                                                                    1. re: biondanonima

                                                                                      We are twins separated at birth. I detest beets but will eat those pink pickled eggs.

                                                                                2. re: biondanonima

                                                                                  They do taste like sweet dirt, but I happen to like that flavor. Weird, I know.

                                                                                      1. re: Isolda

                                                                                        Ha, good description. That's why I hate them though. Guess I'm just not a beet person.

                                                                                      2. re: biondanonima

                                                                                        bion, I ate dirt as a kid, could spot a nice bunch of soft silky dirt a mile away.
                                                                                        I'd get off my horse, set a spell and consume the stuff, mighty good too :)

                                                                                        my husband and I had our first epiphany's when we were at dinner at the Silver Spur where our salads came with sliced beets on them. we'd both had beets in our lives but always both hated them and couldn't understand why anyone would choose to eat those sweet briney things. the salad there at the Silver Spur is special and we now both love beets. go figure..............

                                                                                      3. re: Chowrin

                                                                                        We often hang around the stall at the market that sells beets for a few minutes just to get someone's spare greens - inevitably within 3 minutes someone will ask to cut off the tops, and we'll ask if we can take them and split their cost. Win win! Love beet greens, but it's taken two years before I can stomach beets, and only when roasted into chips with lots of salt.

                                                                                        1. re: thursday

                                                                                          thursday (and by the way today it's Saturday:)))))

                                                                                          can you share what you do with beet greens cause I'll do that method too if I can get the greens. and I'd assume I'd be going to the farmers markets around town on Saturday's to find anyone selling fresh vegs right? I mean in our supermarkets they sell beets with the greens on but like in the olden days at the market, people would buy fresh stem on carrots and ask for the stems to be cut off, I'd take 'em home for my horsies :)

                                                                                          1. re: iL Divo

                                                                                            Beet greens (like all bitter greens, IMO) = best with bacon. =) But now that we've gotten more used to them, we can eat them with less pork-y accompaniment.

                                                                                            Clean, shred, and sautee in olive oil or bacon fat. You can discard some of the tougher parts of stem if you want, but we usually keep it. Toss with pasta or other carb of choice and any (or all) of the following: bacon, goat cheese, walnuts, roasted beets, sauteed or carmelized red onions, garlic. They're not as bitter as many of the other greens out there, so we actually like them best.

                                                                                            http://strangeandyummy.com

                                                                                            1. re: thursday

                                                                                              IMO, spinach and beet greens boiled in water cook in approximately the same amount of time; very short. Squeeze and add to any casserole.

                                                                                              I can imagine using beet greens in just about anything that is a casserole, in place of spinach or chard. When cooked, beet greens are just as fine and silky as spinach when it is cooked.

                                                                                              Spinach and beet greens both boil down to such a small amount. When we buy beets; say a bunch of 3, there is hardly enough to worry about except a few bitefuls, which sometimes we just add a tad/bit of good vinegar to them on our separate little bowls full.

                                                                                        2. re: Chowrin

                                                                                          I love beet greens -- they're probably my favorite green -- but the beets themselves? Yeesh. I can tolerate them in small quantities but they're never tops on my list. (Oh, though I do like this pickled beet recipe of Alton Brown's: http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/al...)

                                                                                          1. re: LauraGrace

                                                                                            LauraGrace, "yeesh".......................... I'm laughing out loud here, that's a GREAT word, hahahhhah

                                                                                          2. re: Chowrin

                                                                                            never had beet greens and come to think of it, barely had beets.
                                                                                            coming from southern California, I can't say greens of any sort was anything I grew up with.

                                                                                          3. re: Chowrin

                                                                                            Chowrin, I DO think for most people, it IS how you cook a beet. Roast them, like how they are treated all over Europe, and they are a revelation; sweet, earthy, nutty. Much better than boiled.

                                                                                            Even older beets are wonderful after roasting!

                                                                                            1. re: gingershelley

                                                                                              I made roasted beets for dinner - basically I cut them in small-medium dice, mixed in the food-processored parsley and dill with olive oil. 420F. Someone mentioned vermouth - hey, that wouldn't be bad either.
                                                                                              Served: salmon with the same topping, parsley, dill and olive oil, roasted, and salad.

                                                                                              1. re: gingershelley

                                                                                                I love roasted beets, still can't get DH to eat them. oh well, more for me! :)

                                                                                                1. re: gingershelley

                                                                                                  hiding behind a couch here, I bought 2 very large beets about a year ago from a let's just say "less than savory store". they were old-ish too as they had a bit of "give" when I was felt them.
                                                                                                  washed 'em good, salt and peppered the outside rubbed them with a little olive oil, foiled them up and baked in convection oven until I assumed they'd be done.
                                                                                                  very very good but you can tell I have no idea how to prepare beets from this lame description.
                                                                                                  sliced thin, I'd do them again with vigor.

                                                                                                2. re: Chowrin

                                                                                                  I love beets just about any way they come.
                                                                                                  Oven roasted and served with sour cream. Yay

                                                                                                  My favorite though is beet juice and carrot juice with some heavy cream mixed in.
                                                                                                  SO sweet and creamy like a lovely creamsicle!
                                                                                                  only 3 ingredients but man is it good!

                                                                                                  1. re: Sparklebright

                                                                                                    I know how to come by carrot juice, from my juicer, but how do you get beet juice? same way, juicing? that'd be pretty expensive and messy if spilled.

                                                                                                    1. re: iL Divo

                                                                                                      I have a juicer, and have wondered myself, why anyone would want to drink juiced beets except for health reasons - Yes, I know; that's the reason for juicing.

                                                                                                      I love cooked beets, but raw? Whoa, not me.
                                                                                                      Also, I just cannot imagine the dirt from those beets that weren't rinsed off well - what about e coli?

                                                                                                      1. re: iL Divo

                                                                                                        Yes! I juice beets the same way I do carrots. I peel the beets.
                                                                                                        I know, beets are pretty expensive most of the time but sometimes I luck out at the farmer's market.
                                                                                                        I would definitely say that my creamsicle does NOT taste like health food in any way.
                                                                                                        Beets it seems, have way more sugar than carrots even.

                                                                                                        And I may be on my own but I juice because I love the taste of freshly pessed juice. Health reasons? Borrrring. :-)

                                                                                                      2. re: Sparklebright

                                                                                                        And I know it's an old thread but has anyone mentioned beet kvass?
                                                                                                        I crave the stuff sometimes, usually in winter when beets are the most expensive--but I can get 2 batches out of the same few beets. Just refill with salty water.

                                                                                                        1. re: Sparklebright

                                                                                                          Something I'd never seen

                                                                                                          http://livingmaxwell.com/beet-kvass

                                                                                                          . As I received today my first batch of Pickl-It jars, so I am glad you mentioned it (Fed-Ex). Thanks.

                                                                                                          1. re: Rella

                                                                                                            Yay! I'm so happy! Done right it tastes just like great pickle juice--sweet and savory and sour all at the same time ..and oh yeah--good for you too.