HOME > Chowhound > Cookware >

Discussion

Copper cookware with copper diffuser: overkill?

  • 9

I was/am planing on buying a Bella/Copper copper diffuser.

My burners are way too small for my stainless fry pans and sauce pots already, and can't hold a simmer without the flame being blown out, which would lead to my family and I dying and then being out-and-out dead, probably feeling hungry as our last conscious apprehension. So I can see quite well how your product will help me right there.

I get that.

Barring the benefits of expanding my useful flame area, would using your diffuser be a case of gilding (no pun intended) the lily? Ie, not worth it given that I am using copper cookware?

It's website mentions copper cookware, as opposed to cast iron, steel, and aluminum, only once, as far as I could find: saying BellaCopper helps keep the cookware's patina looking better longer. Not a ringing endorsement, or consideration of circumstances like my own.

  1. Click to Upload a photo (10 MB limit)
Delete
  1. Hi, Rob:

    I think it depends on how bad your burners are and how flat you can keep both the pan and the trivet. IMO, 2mm more copper added to a 1.5mm table service pan would work wonders. But you might indeed be gilding the lilly with sliding it under a truly thick pan. I wish I could remember where I read this, but *somewhere* I read that the theoretical optimum thickness for *evenness* is 2.87mm.

    At some practical level, 2 + 1.5 doesn't exactly = 3.5, because there will be some gap-osis twixt pan bottom and trivet. If the stop-start theories that underly some clad, e.g., d5, are true (which I doubt), perhaps this could work an *improvement* in evenness, but not--I suspect--unless there was some sort of thermal bond between the two.

    LOL, that's some creative puffery about the patina preservation. The trivet would be useful for this only to the extent it *shielded* the pan from heat!

    Aloha,
    Kaleo

    8 Replies
    1. re: kaleokahu

      What does "table service" mean?

      BTW, my 9-and11-in. fryers, which project a ring almost one and 1/2 inch in radius around the burner, and have ass-crazy hot spots, are Tools of the Trade Belgique (made in Korea and Thailand, according to the imprint). So for _those_ --still and for a while the vast majority of my cookware--it makes sense to get the BellaCopper? (You said it already in your reply, but I need it said again in small words.

      Rob

      PS: Has anyone ever heard of Spartan copper cookware? There's a used sale, they have bronze handles.

      1. re: rbraham

        Hi, Rob:

        "Table service", when it comes to copperware, is a term reserved for thin-gauge pans that were never designed to really cook in, but rather to present food and serve from, at the table. THe best modern example is the Mauviel M150 line.

        Yes, I think the sheet copper trivet would help you. Did you read the threads on eGullet?

        Aloha,
        Kaleo

        1. re: kaleokahu

          And tableware, although notably lacking vis a vis the heavy stuff, is IMHO than most clad cookwares. Tableware also invariably comes with brass handles. Use pot holders or a towel to move them on the stove.

          1. re: tim irvine

            I think an adjective got eaten up in your reply. :)

          2. re: kaleokahu

            eGullet I read only when a Google pops it up, which of course is hit or miss depending on search terms.

            Rob

            1. re: rbraham

              Hi, Rob:

              You should find those two threads on eG about Bella Copper if you're still interested. The best info is from a doyen of that site, named andie[something]. The demographic is different, the population smaller, the posts more infrequent, but there are nuggets there. I won't say the knowledge base is better or worse, it's just... different.

              Aloha,
              Kaleo