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Grease splatters on All Clad stainless---how do I get them off?

My boyfriend used my All Clad skillet to fry corn tortillas in grapeseed oil. Now I have brownish grease spatter marks all over the sides of the pan that won't come off. I have tried Bar Keeper's Friend, Magic Eraser and general elbow grease with SOS. They are a little lighter but still not clean. Does anyone have any tips on how to remove them and also (other than not using that pan) how to avoid burned on grease spatters stains in the future?

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  1. Most of my stainless pans get like this. I just clean them the best I can with Brillo and let them be. I just accept that the pans will get used, makes me feel like a real cook in some way.

    Some posters swear by Dawn Power Dissolver, or you can try a little oven cleaner.

    1. Use Bar Keepers Friend to clean any stainless, using a scratchless nylon scrubber.

      3 Replies
      1. re: GH1618

        ^^^^^^^^^^ Here's your answer!! ^^^^^^^^^^^^^

        1. re: Uncle Bob

          OP stated she tried BKF and it didn't work.

          1. re: iluvcookies

            Right — she needs to scrub harder. Or maybe soak in ammonia solution for awhile first.

            Maybe the surface of the SS has been roughed up with inappropriate cleaning pads or abrasive cleaners, which will have made it more difficult to clean. If that's the case, just accept it. Do not let BF use good pans.

      2. If you warm the pan first, and then use very hot water, the SOS pad will do the trick--I had exactly the same problem from frying tortillas.

        1. Try baking soda paste. Put a lot of baking soda and a few drop of water to make it into paste-like. Let it sit there for a few minutes, then scrub.

          1. I have not found any grease on SS situation,, including charred fat and BBQ sauce cooked onto grill grates at 900 F, that didn't yield to a good soaking in a heavy ammonia bath followed by SOS.

            4 Replies
            1. re: tim irvine

              <yield to a good soaking in a heavy ammonia>

              Agree.

              1. re: Chemicalkinetics

                Vinegar eats into the baked on seasoning on cast iron so I don't see why that would'nt work. Those grease spatters is baked on grease, just like the coats of seasoning on cast iron. I would just try letting the vinegar set in the pan for a day or two then scrub it. You might even try heating that vinegar up in the skillet.

              2. re: tim irvine

                So just pour some straight ammonia in there & let it sit for a while? It will stink up the house but will be worth it.
                BF is getting banned from many things in the kitchen-lol.

                1. re: sparkareno

                  I think straight out of the bottle would be way too strong.

              3. They also make a lemon scented ammonia. It doesn't really smell like a lemon but it isn't such an overwhelming ammonia smell. Of course we'll probably learn in a few years that it does something horrible to us. O well.

                1 Reply
                1. re: tim irvine

                  <...that is does something horrible to us...>

                  Nah. There's nothing like ammonia for cleaning windows and mirrors and women have been doing it for several decades. Dilute it down, don't use it straight.

                2. Washing soda is a good alternative to ammonia for cleaning grease, also. Don't get any alkiline cleaner on aluminum, however.

                  1. With a moist soft sponge dab some BKF with the corner. Pick a small spot to work on. Don't work on the whole skillet at once. Always go with the grain. Start by applying very gentle pressure with your fingers. Keep the sponge moist but not soaking wet so you're not grinding away or washing away the abrasives. Then start to apply firm pressure once BKF is broken down.