HOME > Chowhound > Hawaii >
Do you create unique foods? Get great advice
TELL US

origin of the loco moco

indelibledotink May 11, 2012 12:06 AM

i will be going to the big island at the end of this month and have got tons of very casual and one or two upscale places to eat from all the postings. thank you chowhound!

but i was wondering where the loco moco got it's start. two postings here claim Cafe 100. wikipedia says Lincoln Grill or May's Fountain. hawaii magazine says lincoln's as well. any historians?

  1. manomin May 20, 2012 11:18 AM

    Until Thursday I'd never had a loco moco in 28 years.........However I was at He'eia Pier and had theirs, AMAZING!!!!! A perfectly charred Kuahiwi beef patty, perfect eggs running all atop the most flavorful gravy imagineable. That and their patty melt made for an amazing breakfast!

    3 Replies
    1. re: manomin
      KaimukiMan May 22, 2012 12:27 AM

      you know... they REALLY do need to add a "like" button on chowhound.

      1. re: manomin
        flylice2x May 22, 2012 02:21 AM

        Gardena Bowl in Gardena CA gives you an option of hambuger patties or portuguese sausage patties with or without grilled onions...

        1. re: flylice2x
          k
          kaleokahu May 22, 2012 04:08 PM

          Porta Moco, niiiiiice. But beware the haoa (heartburn).

      2. deet13 May 16, 2012 04:39 PM

        Here's a link to an excerpt from an article written in '81 which puts a few names to the story, but not much else...
        http://www.popular-today.com/2008/11/7/72/2008-11-7-72-1.html

        The only other thing I've seen is that the original Lincoln Grill was on Kino'ole Street in Hilo, which runs parallel to the park.

        Somewhere down this street...
        http://maps.google.com/maps?hl=en&...

        1. b
          Bellachefa May 14, 2012 08:44 AM

          I thought loco moco was inspired by maui wowie

          10 Replies
          1. re: Bellachefa
            Tripeler May 16, 2012 01:17 AM

            I keep imagining the Loco Moco was a dance craze from the early 60s. Still, you can't get any more Hawaiian than this popular dish.

            1. re: Tripeler
              k
              kaleokahu May 16, 2012 03:43 PM

              Hi, Tripeler:

              Except maybe poi, 'uala, lu'au and pua'a or moa kalua ('Ilio has gone out of vogue).

              Aloha,
              Kaleo

              1. re: kaleokahu
                b
                Bellachefa May 16, 2012 04:31 PM

                Aloha Kaleo,

                I love your posts. It might be more informative to translate for the lay person/traveler when you use hawaiian words. I often know what you speak of, but many don't have the time to google or go to an English/Hawaiian dictionary.

                1. re: Bellachefa
                  k
                  kaleokahu May 16, 2012 08:52 PM

                  E Bellachefa, Aloha:

                  Good point. For others' benefit, since you have 'olelo (thank you for that):

                  "Except maybe poi [pounded cooked taro, sweet or fermented], 'uala [sweet potatoes], lu'au [foods steamed in ti leaves] and pua'a or moa kalua [pork or chicken, baked underground] ('Ilio [dog] has gone out of vogue)."

                  I was being coy with our aikane (friend) Tripeler, who is very wise about many things, including Hawai'i nei. Many foods have become "Hawai'ian", and it has been so since the first star- and bird-guided voyaging canoe touched. Halakahiki (pineapple), Pipi kaulau (chipped beef) Lomilomi (chopped) salmon, Loco Moko, SPAM Wasubi, Mac salad, Mikana (papaya). Any grinds with aloha are welcome, we say.

                  No try Hahalua (manta ray) or koa'e (frigate birds), though. They're family.

                  Aloha,
                  Kaleo

                  1. re: kaleokahu
                    Tripeler May 16, 2012 11:40 PM

                    When I mentioned that Loco Moko is the most "Hawai'ian" i meant it in the context of outside of Hawaii as it is the most popular Hawaiian dish encountered. To be honest, though, I have no idea what "SPAM Wasubi" is, but guess that it's a SPAM Musubi with plenty of wasabi inside.

                    1. re: Tripeler
                      k
                      kaleokahu May 17, 2012 09:06 AM

                      Hi, Tripeler:

                      I think we each knew what the other meant. Pono 'ole au onda "Wasubi" though. Pono 'oe.

                      Do you think LM is popular outside of Hawai'i, or the dish visitors encounter most while visiting? I would have guessed kalua pig...

                      Aloha,
                      Kaleo

                      1. re: kaleokahu
                        b
                        Bellachefa May 17, 2012 12:23 PM

                        Honest answer, of all my many visits to the islands, I have still yet to try Loco Moco. Now poke, roadside huli huli chicken or kalua pig.......mmmmm hmmmmm

                        1. re: Bellachefa
                          k
                          kaleokahu May 17, 2012 01:14 PM

                          E Bellachefa:

                          LOL, don't build LM up to much in your imagination before you try, or it is likely to ho'ohoka (disappoint) a little. More 'ono like Mac Salad than 'ono like hulihuli chicken, IMO.

                          Aloha,
                          Kaleo

                          1. re: kaleokahu
                            b
                            Bellachefa May 17, 2012 02:00 PM

                            mmmmmm hmmmmm is hawaiian for yummy LOL!!!!!

              2. re: Tripeler
                Bill Hunt May 21, 2012 07:36 PM

                Performed by Little Eva, no doubt????

                Hunt

            2. k
              kaleokahu May 11, 2012 10:06 PM

              Hi, indelibledotink:

              Hmmm... Let's see... Huamoa (aka eggs, brought with, c800AD) + Pipi (beef, gift from George Vancouver, 1793, but kapu to eat until 1830) + laiki (rice, first try grow 1858) + Knorr brown gravy mix (?)....

              Nah, I'm sayin gets one hungry opu in 1859, well before Knorr or those restos. Hiki no?

              Aloha,
              Kaleo

              1. m
                macaraca May 11, 2012 02:43 PM

                Hard to argue with the links on the Wikipedia site...even Cafe 100 doesn't claim to have created it...only credit for popularizing it.

                1 Reply
                1. re: macaraca
                  indelibledotink May 11, 2012 10:30 PM

                  thnx, didn't see those links

                Show Hidden Posts