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Great new innovation making chicken broth!

My sister emailed me a new way of making awesome chicken broth because she knows I thrive on it.

Quite simply, it is to purchase 2 whole chickens or 2 pkgs breasts whatever you want, but keep them sealed in 2 different packages.

In your deep soup pot, start your normal stewing of only 1 of your pkg's as usual only this time add 1 1/2 tsp ginger. The ugly frothy junk that comes up will triple the normal amount you used to get in the first few minutes when it reaches a near boil.

Keep spooning it off and no matter what type chicken is in there, turn it over, it will spit out loads more of that junk. Yep, you guessed it - after about 20 minutes, no more junk!

That's great, but there's MORE:

Continue stewing the chicken until done, remove from pot. Turn off the heat and let broth stand until near room temperature and put the whole pot in the frig.

Same day or next day, get the pot of broth out of the frig, dump your 2nd pkg of chicken in again, add the ginger and do that again. Stew until done.

VOILA - awesome deep chicken flavored broth for any dish you choose.

Now, I came straight here after testing that out because I had never joined. I've been a faithful reader of ChowHound for over a year. I've learned so much here - that I finally found something great to 'give back' for all the great helps you've given me.

Pennie 77

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  1. Sounds good. By the way, a Japanese friend just stirs the froth back into the stock. He says it's just protein. Kinda makes sense. I mean, when I roast a chicken, I don't notice anything like that. Maybe it cooks off?

    1. Thanks for sharing, Pennie77 and glad you decided to join us. I'm thinking you could remove the first batch of chicken before refrigerating and remove the meat. Then return just the bones to the stock overnight and continue the next day. That way, you can use the meat from the first batch of chicken meat w/out overcooking it.

      5 Replies
      1. re: chowser

        America's Test Kitchen had a formula where you use one chicken (remove the meat after cooking through) and one pound of ground chicken (thrown away at the end).

        1. re: GraydonCarter

          Do they say what the ground chicken adds that, say chicken wings/thighs which add collagen won't?

          I hate wasting the chicken meat which is why I pull it off when it's still edible. Does cooking the meat further give you anything more?

          1. re: chowser

            Well, that's the thing. You pull off the chicken meat while it still has some flavor.

            Flavor extraction happens quickly on the surface of meat, so to increase the surface area of the chicken and speed up the rate at which the flavor is extracted, use store-bought ground chicken. It gives up its flavor so readily after sauteeing with aromatics that, in about an hour, you get an intense, golden, chicken-y stock.

            http://www.cooksillustrated.com/recip...

            1. re: GraydonCarter

              Interesting that they started w/ sauteed chicken meat. I wonder if I started the stock by searing the chicken meat in the pot and then adding water, if that would be better than putting everything in at once. I might try that next time.

              1. re: chowser

                Actually I'm going to skip this whole step and just use that new product, Swanson Flavor Boost concentrated broth.

      2. Perhaps the coffee has worn off and I'm not reading things properly, but I don't understand what the "great new innovation" is. Is it tripling the amount of foamy stuff by using ginger? Or poaching two chickens one after the other? I would think the ginger would flavor the broth and what the heck am I going to do with 2 cooked chickens? (Yeah, I know it freezes but I hate having excess meat in the freezer). I thought the only reason to skim off the foamy stuff is so you have a completely clear stock for consomme. Just trying to figure it out.

        7 Replies
        1. re: gourmanda

          My thoughts exactly.

          And I'm not trying to be snarky about it.

          1. re: ipsedixit

            i simply don't like poached chicken and can't bear to toss out otherwise perfectly good meat. i use heads, backs and feet for stock now. golden gelatinous goodness.

            1. re: hotoynoodle

              I keep bags of frozen carcasses in the freezer; toss in wings, neck, whatever I can get cheaply to make stock. I don't dislike poached chicken, though, and use it to make things like chicken pot pie, chicken salad. It's great for a quick meal.

                  1. re: 1POINT21GW

                    don't like dumplings. nope.

                    if i make any kind of chicken casserole, i use roasted chicken. also i prefer dark meat which i don't think poaches as nicely as the white meat does.

          2. re: gourmanda

            At some point, most ideas were "Great innovations" to some of us, even if it's been around. I thought it was nice to be more welcoming to a newbie.

          3. What you're describing, Pennie 77, is called a "double stock". You could even do it one more time and make a "triple stock".

            1. Thank you so much for sharing the chicken broth technique. Yes, it is so nice to get to share a good idea as a "thanks" to the fellow chowhounds. I know I have learned a ton of stuff here.

              1. Thanks for the information!

                Here's something you might want to give a shot to reduce your effort.

                In regards to skimming, I've taken the lazy way out and not skim. I've found that if I gently boil/simmer the stock, the foam disappears (or breaks down into little bit floating on the layer of fat) and the liquid portion of the stock clears up. However, if you want an absolutely clear stock, skimming is the way to go.

                1 Reply
                1. re: dave_c

                  fining the finished, strained stock with egg whites also gives a clear stock.