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Chicken Powder -- How do you use it?

alkapal May 2, 2012 04:07 AM

Is it like bouillon? http://www.asiadish.com/ingredients/c...

How do you use it?

Any recipes that really benefit from its addition?

How do you compare it with "Better than Bouillon"?

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  1. todao RE: alkapal May 2, 2012 07:07 AM

    It is simply powdered bouillon and it can be used for making sauces, soups, gravy, etc, much the same way you might use a bouillon. How it compares to "Better than Bouillon" I can't say. I think that would be a matter of personal taste. But if you're looking for a comparison, consider it to be a lot of pretty much the same stuff you get in a packet with chicken flavor Top Ramen.

    1 Reply
    1. re: todao
      ipsedixit RE: todao May 2, 2012 07:21 AM

      But if you're looking for a comparison, consider it to be a lot of pretty much the same stuff you get in a packet with chicken flavor Top Ramen.
      ____________________________

      This is that proverbial nail being hit on the head.

    2. f
      ferret RE: alkapal May 2, 2012 07:13 AM

      Better than Bouillon's primary ingredient (by volume) is chicken, chicken powder's primary ingredient is salt.

      1. luckyfatima RE: alkapal May 2, 2012 07:34 AM

        This stuff has spread around the world and is used daily by home cooks as a regular kitchen staple in urban centers in many cuisines from Mexico (Knorr Suiza powder) to the Philippines to Vietnam to Somalia (Maggi cubes). It is essentially chemicals, chicken fat and chicken flavor, salt, and MSG.

        I am not opposed to it and keep Knorr Suiza (big one from CostCo) and use it in stocks, beans, gravies, Chinese recipes, etc. It just boosts flavor (umami levels) and gives oomph, but is not a substitute for well made foods with quality ingredients. You can always taste-spot poorly made food with too much stock powder, so it should be used with caution. In my experience I have seen people use the 'chicken' versions even in dishes of other proteins (beef, pork, fish, etc), like it is common in beef menudo, pork pozole, caldo de rez (beef soup), etc (observed the same for other cuisines, too, not just MX). But they do sell other animal protein-MSG powders, not sure why chicken is so popular.

        Knorr and other companies with similar stock powder-MSG products have also made gains in Middle Eastern cuisines and they are marketing now in South Asia as well.

        1. r
          RamenNoodleFan RE: alkapal Jun 18, 2012 03:05 PM

          It is pretty much Bouillon in powder form.

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