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Japanese cotton soft cheesecake, confused...

Hi guys n gals,
I'm confused as to what is the method to cool a Japanese soufflé cottonsoft cheesecake?, some recipe calls for the cake to be:
1) cool in the oven for like an hour ( rationale: drastic decrease in temperature will cause the cake to collapse) Eg: http://www.thecookbookchronicles.com/..., http://lilyng2000.blogspot.com/2005/1...

while others call fr the cake to be

2) removed immediately (rationale: allowing the cake to sit in mould will Cause the cake to sink) eg: http://wendyinkk.blogspot.com/2010/05..., http://mybakingcottage.blogspot.com/2...

...so which is the right way to it??? Love love love Japanese style cheesecake so would totally love to be able to make it right.
Thanks all

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  1. I think if you do a search here, you will find some excellent recipes/advice from buttertart, who frequently makes Japanese cheesecakes.

    1 Reply
    1. re: roxlet

      Do u have the links to buttertart's method, buttertart has a lot of post so kinda hard to find where it was posted exactly . Thanks

    2. I'm no expert but
      http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/7903...
      and
      http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/816199
      the later also links to other threads on the subject, ought to get you off to a good start.

      14 Replies
      1. re: maplesugar

        Checked out the links, but they don't exactly answer my question. Sigh...

        Both cooling method sounds logical ...

        1. re: keepquiet

          I take mine out and let it cool on the counter in the pan. It will collapse somewhat but it's still cottony and nice.
          I think if you left it in the turned-off oven you'd get it overbaked.
          Must make one soon!

          1. re: buttertart

            Hi buttertart , So you remove the cheesecake immediately once it's done baking?, do u unmould the immediately or allow it to sit in the pan?

            1. re: keepquiet

              Yes, immediately, and I cool it in the pan.

              1. re: buttertart

                just recently saw some recipes for this and want to try it. thanks!

                1. re: buttertart

                  Buttertart: Cool, thanks. I will do as u did.

                  Hotoynoodle: try it!, it's quite different from the typical American style. And let me know how it when it you did make it!

                  1. re: keepquiet

                    I love it, it's the only cheesecake I make any more.

                      1. re: buttertart

                        Buttertart, Do you mind sharing the reicpe u use?

                        1. re: keepquiet

                          8 oz cream cheese
                          3 egg yolks
                          1/4 c cornstarch
                          grated rind of 1 lemon + 2 tb juice
                          1/4 c milk or cream
                          1 tsp vanilla
                          Combine in food processor until smooth
                          3 egg whites
                          1/2 tsp cream of tartar
                          Beat to soft peaks and beat in 1/2 c sugar, beat to firm peaks
                          Fold cream cheese mixture into egg whites
                          Bake in deep 8" pan in water bath 40-45 mins at 350 deg F
                          It will inflate and fall, but the texture is wonderful, more like a spongecake than a cheesecake.

                          1. re: buttertart

                            Hi buttertart! This thread is really old, sorry to revive it but I have a question about this Japanese cheesecake. I made a cheesecake with the following recipe:

                            Ingredients:
                            250 ml milk
                            250 gm cream cheese, cubed and softened at room temperature
                            60 gm butter, softened at room temperature
                            6 egg yolks
                            55 gm cake flour
                            20 gm corn flour
                            1 lemon zest
                            6 egg whites
                            1/4 tsp cream of tartar
                            130 gm caster sugar

                            Baked at 170 deg cel for 1 hour. However my cake didn't turn out like a cake. It's more of a wet, pudding like texture.

                            I followed the instructions as it is (including the stiff egg whites) so I am really confused what went wrong, whether it is the ingredients or the method.

                            1. re: fivefeet

                              Hi fivefeet, the recipe I use doesn't have butter in it and has less liquid, as well as fewer eggs as I recall. Try that one, I've never had it come out badly. Sorry not metric ;-)

                              8 oz cream cheese
                              3 egg yolks
                              1/4 c cornstarch
                              grated rind of 1 lemon + 2 tb juice
                              1/4 c milk or cream
                              1 tsp vanilla
                              Combine in food processor until smooth
                              3 egg whites
                              1/2 tsp cream of tartar
                              Beat to soft peaks and beat in 1/2 c sugar, beat to firm peaks
                              Fold cream cheese mixture into egg whites
                              Bake in deep 8" pan in water bath 40-45 mins at 350 deg F
                              It will inflate and fall, but the texture is wonderful, more like a spongecake than a cheesecake.

                              1. re: buttertart

                                Thanks for the recipe!

                                I will try this out once I cleared the cheese cake-pudding abomination in my fridge.

                                1. re: fivefeet

                                  Freeze it, then whip it in the food processor, it makes a nice ice cream!

          2. When I was researching how to bake these cheesecakes, this was the most thorough explanation of baking technique I found:

            "Just as with souffles and angel-food cakes, the rise of your cake depends on steam-filled bubbles lifting the batter while the egg proteins set. The trick is, you don't want to overcook the batter, nor do you want to have dramatic swings in temperature, which might deflate the bubbles before the proteins have set. So, you need to do a staged baking process.

            First, preheat the oven to 180C (350F) for at least 30 minutes to be sure the walls of the oven are hot (if you simply quick-heat the oven, all you've heated is air, much of which will rush out the moment you add your cake).

            Put the cake pan in the empty bain-marie vessel, place the bain-marie on the oven rack, and then add the boiling water.

            Bake for 15 minutes, then lower the temperature to 160C (325F) and continue to bake until the top turns lightly golden (about 25 minutes, depending on your oven -- but don't go strictly by time during this phase).

            Finally, turn off the oven and leave the cake pan for another 40 minutes to an hour."

            -- By member Bruce Goldstein on the website "Seasoned Advice".

            The tip about preheating the oven for an entire 30 minutes is brilliant since, as he points out, the thermostat just registers when the air inside has reached your selected temperature.

            2 Replies
              1. re: ninrn

                Ah, maybe this could be the trick to make the Japanese cheesecake happen.

                I initially followed the original temperature of the recipe, which was 160deg cel, but my oven refused to heat up for very long. Temperamental metal thing urgh.