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italian wood product care

i
itryalot Apr 7, 2012 09:33 AM

I just received a beautiful, large Arte Legno Italian Olive Wood Cheese/Bread Board. How do I care for this product so it doesn't crack and it still usable?

Also, my mom found some high quality Italian beechwood spoons, slotted spoons and spatula for a bargain price. They are solid and of nice weight.
I don't mind the patina, but want to make sure I care for it properly and it is cleaned properly after use.
Thanks

  1. kaleokahu Apr 7, 2012 09:47 AM

    Hi, itryalot:

    When the wood looks or feels dry, a very light coat of USP mineral oil does the trick

    Aloha,
    Kaleo

    1. Chemicalkinetics Apr 7, 2012 12:56 PM

      <I just received a beautiful, large Arte Legno Italian Olive Wood Cheese/Bread Board>

      I assume it has been properly dried. If not, it needs to be dried. There are many methods to keep the board in the prime condition. They are all about keeping water from entering and leaving the board. The simplest way is to use mineral oil. You will need to do this periodically.
      You can also using drying oil like tung oil.
      You may also use beeswax or a mixture of beeswax and mineral -- this works better than using just mineral oil.

      8 Replies
      1. re: Chemicalkinetics
        i
        itryalot Apr 7, 2012 04:03 PM

        I know this is a stupid question (but I don't know the answer). MIneral oil - is it safe for eating on? In response to your comment, how would I know if it has been properly dried or not?

        1. re: itryalot
          Chemicalkinetics Apr 7, 2012 06:49 PM

          You just opened a point which many people argue.

          First of all, you don't want mineral oil with perfumes or other additives. Those should not be consumed. Pure USP mineral oil is used as a laxative, so it is can be consumed in small quantity. Now, there are other people who believe mineral oil should not be consumed under any circumstances. I disagree with this view, but I also want to make sure you know there are opposite views, so you can make your own decision.

          If you are concern about mineral oil, then you can use beeswax. I have never heard of anyone oppose to beeswax.

          As for the wood question, I am pretty sure it is properly dried since you probably pay quiet a bit for it.

          1. re: Chemicalkinetics
            i
            itryalot Apr 10, 2012 12:57 PM

            OK; I will check with my pharmacist on the mineral oil. Somewhere I read about walnut oil but couldn't find much to back that up.

            1. re: itryalot
              kaleokahu Apr 10, 2012 02:40 PM

              Hi, itryalot:

              Go with what your doctor tells you. But the idea behind mineral oil is that it will not turn rancid. Walnut oil probably will to some degree. Beeswax sounds like a good idea, but it needs to be liquid enough to penetrate the pores in the wood; what the maker uses to thin the wax may be far more questionable than the USP mineral oil.

              Personally, I'd be more worried at the prospect of ingesting minute quantities of known carcinogens in rancid oil (a la Dr. Weil) than I would be ingesting minute quantities of a laxative.

              Aloha,
              Kaleo

              1. re: itryalot
                Chemicalkinetics Apr 10, 2012 03:13 PM

                Some people don't like mineral oil at all. All cooking oils will go rancid soon or later, but I believe walnut oil and coconut oil turn rancid very slowly, so they are not bad choices.

                1. re: Chemicalkinetics
                  m
                  mikie Apr 10, 2012 07:04 PM

                  The fact of the matter is that just about any wood finish sold today is safe once it dries, even varnish. You can buy salid bowl oil, which is a drying oil, similar to tung oil, or a wiping varnish. Personally, I prefer the combination of mineral oil, which has been previously suggested and has been used for decades as a laxative, not so much anymore, but that's because they have better options, and bees wax. You can make your own by combining the two at about 2 or 3 parts mineral oil to 1 part bees wax in a microwave. Heat it slowly and you will be fine. You can either then apply it while still warm or let it cool completely to a soft paste and apply it by hand. The bees wax helps keep the water out.

                  1. re: mikie
                    Chemicalkinetics Apr 10, 2012 07:09 PM

                    <You can make your own by combining the two at about 2 or 3 parts mineral oil to 1 part bees wax in a microwave>

                    Agree. The person can also try to the ratio to suit his/her need.

                    <You can either then apply it while still warm or let it cool completely to a soft paste and apply it by hand.>

                    I also find using a hair dryer can help (by keeping it warm).

                2. re: itryalot
                  tanuki soup Apr 11, 2012 06:40 AM

                  I really like this stuff:

                  http://www.amazon.com/Howard-BBC012-B...

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