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Bought a De Buyer Carbone Plus Fry Pan. Now what?

m
mikerng Apr 3, 2012 01:33 AM

In my search for a good quality steel fry pan, I have heard the name De Buyer come up a lot.

Went down to my local cookware store and found some De Buyer fry pan, they had the blue steel as well as the Carbone Plus which was what I opted for in a 30cm size, due to overall heft and general feeling about its quality. The sales assistant was a temp staff who knew about cookware as much as an accountant knows about building aircrafts. Pic attached.

There was some slight rust very minor which was why the pan was marked down. My questions are:

1) What is the best way to get rid of the rust?
2) The handle seems to be coated with some kind of protective coating, which gives it some sheen and a marbled surface, unlike the face of the pan. Can I assume that the handle is rust proof and as such no need for oiling?
3) When it comes to seasoning, is there any special instructions to be aware of? I hear something about boiling potato peels??

I hope these questions don't sound too stupid, but I've only cooked with non stick pans (which I have ditched) and a Carbon Steel Wok.

I season my wok several times over with a procedure of heating and oiling after I gave it a thorough scrubbing with a steel wool and some dishwashing soap the first time. The final step involved frying it in some ginger and chives to rid the wok of a metallic smell. I try to avoid cooking anything too acidic and mostly with a generous amount of oil for the first 10 times of using it.

I wonder if there is a need to season the De Buyer Fry Pan a different way.

 
  1. u
    unprofessional_chef Apr 3, 2012 07:21 AM

    "Went down to my local cookware store and found some De Buyer fry pan"

    May I ask what store and how much you paid for your DeBuyer?

    1. Chemicalkinetics Apr 3, 2012 05:15 AM

      "1) What is the best way to get rid of the rust?"

      Depending exactly how light the rust is, you may even use just paper towel alone to remove the rust if it is very light. For most light rust, you can use some white vinegar or Bar Keeper's Friend with a small brush or scrubber.

      "2) The handle seems to be coated with some kind of protective coating, which gives it some sheen and a marbled surface, unlike the face of the pan. Can I assume that the handle is rust proof and as such no need for oiling?"

      I know the Mineral line and Mineral B do have a coating on their handles. I cannot say the same for Carbone Plus.

      "3) When it comes to seasoning, is there any special instructions to be aware of? I hear something about boiling potato peels??"

      Yes, that was an original instruction. Later, DeBuyer took that part away in some of the newer instructions. The potato peel part is really more about cleaning instead of adding a seasoning layer. It is entirely up to you. To add a seasoning layer, you will do what you usually do -- heating the pan with oil in it.

      You can watch this video which has the potato skin:

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e_hcah...

      "I season my wok several times over with a procedure of heating and oiling after I gave it a thorough scrubbing with a steel wool and some dishwashing soap the first time. The final step involved frying it in some ginger and chives to rid the wok of a metallic smell. I try to avoid cooking anything too acidic and mostly with a generous amount of oil for the first 10 times of using it.

      I wonder if there is a need to season the De Buyer Fry Pan a different way."

      The seasoning process can be very personal. There is nothing particularly special about the Debuyer carbon steel vs other carbon steel. I seasoned my DeBuyer carbon steel pan similar to how I have been seasoning my carbon steel woks.

      12 Replies
      1. re: Chemicalkinetics
        f
        Fumet Apr 3, 2012 05:38 AM

        Hi, I have a few carbonne plus. The handle has some sort of coating. Don't know what it is, but it doesn't rust, doesn't need seasoning and I have had it in the oven many times without the slightest issue.

        1. re: Fumet
          Chemicalkinetics Apr 3, 2012 06:18 AM

          Fumet,

          Thanks. I didn't know. I know that Mineral and Mineral B have some silicone coating which prevent them from using above 500 oF in the oven -- or recommended against doing so because of discoloration. My guess is that Carbone Plus has a coating based on mikerng and your response, but maybe a different kind. Thanks again for your information.

        2. re: Chemicalkinetics
          m
          mikerng Apr 3, 2012 05:47 AM

          Thanks for the replies. Managed to check out the video. Glad to hear there is no fixed method to seasoning. Due to my part Chinese Heritage, if my mother knew I was seasoning the De Buyer's way, I'd probably get an earful.

          When you guys cook with the Carbon Plus pan over a stovetop, do you wrap a towel around the handle or is the heat bearable? The weight is alright for me to flip the pan, unlike cast iron.

          Now to hunt for a block of pure beeswax to prevent rust. Sometimes I go away for 2 weeks to a month and oiling the pan makes it smell slightly rancid. Humidity is a huge problem living in the tropics and by the coast.

          1. re: mikerng
            Chemicalkinetics Apr 3, 2012 06:31 AM

            "Due to my part Chinese Heritage, if my mother knew I was seasoning the De Buyer's way, I'd probably get an earful. "

            Like you described above, you use the scrubbing method with steel wool. That should take care of not using the potato peel. I think I used that too -- steel wool. I think, like you, I just have so extensive experienced acquired from seasoning cast iron cookware and carbon steel woks that I don't bother to use something new (potato peel).

            "When you guys cook with the Carbon Plus pan over a stovetop, do you wrap a towel around the handle or is the heat bearable?"

            99% of the time I just grab the handle, and don't use a towel or anything. The handle is slightly warm, but nothing like my cast iron handle -- which sometime I do have to use a towel or a pot holder.

            "Now to hunt for a block of pure beeswax to prevent rust"

            I assume you already know where to one, but just in case you don't, you can get one from most art and craft store. Good luck.

            1. re: Chemicalkinetics
              m
              mikerng Apr 3, 2012 06:53 AM

              Is the art and craft store's Beeswax food grade? I assume this is the type that Debuyer uses for their Mineral pans.

              I am checking my local healthfood store or make a trip to a bee farm to learn more and see if there is a food grade alternative. Not an expert with this but I'd rather just go for something safer.

              1. re: mikerng
                Chemicalkinetics Apr 3, 2012 07:35 AM

                "Is the art and craft store's Beeswax food grade?"

                Well, it depends. You definitely do not want the ones with perfume and other stuffs in them. I bought my beeswax from a local Art and Craft store, and it is a pure natural beeswax. Unfortunately, the store does not carry it at this moment.

                Alternatively, you can buy online and this one is what I got. (The natural one not the white one, but either one is food grade)

                http://www.amazon.com/Beeswax-1-Lb-Block-White/dp/B002YRT4DG/ref=sr_1_4?s=arts-crafts&ie=UTF8&qid=1333463636&sr=1-4

                You probably do not need that much beeswax. I bought it for my cutting board/chopping block.

                http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/7513...

            2. re: mikerng
              s
              seamunky Apr 4, 2012 01:00 AM

              have you tried coconut oil? it's pretty shelf stable. I use it on my De Buyer Mineral B pan and like the results. But then again, I'm not in the tropics and the coconut oil is solid at my local room temp so it acts kind of like a wax.

              1. re: seamunky
                m
                mikerng Apr 4, 2012 08:40 AM

                Hi, coconut is in abundance and I can easily get coconut oil. I'm sure it will work. That said, the coconut oil at room temperature here is liquid due to the heat.

                Anywhere, as a quick update, I've got a tip from a friend to use chapstick, or any old lip balm to coat the pan if you are going to store it indefinitely. This is said to prevent rust and quite easy to apply.

              2. re: mikerng
                rosetown Apr 4, 2012 10:58 AM

                Why not use mineral oil? - food safe and does not go rancid - seems easier than beeswax to me.

                1. re: rosetown
                  m
                  mikerng Apr 7, 2012 06:47 AM

                  I use mineral oil as a honing oil when sharpening knifes but there is a smell which puts me off slightly especially when heated.

                  Seamunky suggestion to use coconut oil is also good. I like the effect.

                  1. re: mikerng
                    rosetown Apr 7, 2012 07:37 AM

                    I didn't know about mineral oil and the off putting smell. I should have included a caveat that I haven't tried it on a carbon steel pan.

                2. re: mikerng
                  f
                  Fumet Apr 4, 2012 01:28 PM

                  hi, Handle never gets too hot to handle on stove top. Bit warm but that's it. I recommend wiping with warm lard for storage, rather than oil. No rancidity problems and seems to resist rust better.

              3. petek Apr 3, 2012 03:03 AM

                Hey mikerng.
                The De Buyer website has a neat little how to video on seasoning you new pan.Worked for me.
                The more you use it,the more non stick it'll become.
                Enjoy your new pan!

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