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Passover birthday cake. Not chocolate flour less

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I need to make at least 2 cakes for pessach perhaps cupcakes for kids. Please provide suggestions because I will need to do Passover birthdays about every 3 years!

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  1. Are you allowed/willing to use hazelnut, coconut, almond or chestnut flour? I love cakes made with nut flours and egg white for leavening. I would call King Arthur Flour and ask a rep. for suggestions. 802.649.3717, or: fax: 800.343.3002
    email: bakers@kingarthurflour.com
    They are so helpful and resourceful!

    1. Years ago, before I went vegan, I adapted an olive oil cake for passover. It's easy and practically fail proof:
      4 large eggs at room temperature
      1 cup sugar
      3 tablespoons orange juice
      1/2 teaspoon Pesach baking powder
      1/8 tsp salt?
      1 cup cake meal or l/2 cup cake meal and l/2 cup potato starch
      grated zest of one orange
      grated zest of one lemon
      1/4 cup pesach apricot preserves or other topping
      (cake meal alone makes a denser moister cake. the mixture makes a lighter drier cake.
      the denser cake keeps better)

      Preheat oven to 350; Grease sides and bottoms of an 8 in spring form pan. Cut an 8 in circle of parchment or wax paper suitable for Pesach. Place in the bottom of the pan and grease the paper again (I use Passover spray oil)

      In a standing mixer (if available) or with hand held electric mixer, beat the eggs and sugar on high until very light and thick, about 5 minutes. (Don't skimp on beating. The mixture should be a very pale yellow). Reduce the speed to law and add oil, juice, baking powder and salt. Blend in. Then with a slotted spoon or rubber spatula fold in the cake meal and zests.

      Pour into prepared pan. Place the pan on a cookie sheet (in case batter leaks from the spring form. It rarely happens, but why take a chance?) Bake until the top is golden brown and the tester comes out clean, about 50 minutes (depending on your oven) Place on a wire rack (still in the pan)to cool for 30 minutes. Remove cake from the pan, discard paper and place on serving plate. Melt apricot preserves and pour over, or make a topping of your choice.

      This cake worked well for years. You could also make a more birthday style frosting either from the kosher for passover mixes, or by concocting your own substitutes for the confectioner's sugar and shortening or margarine commonly used.

      1 Reply
      1. re: lburrell

        This sounds delicious. May give this one a try. I'd go for the denser and moister version. Thanks for sharing.

      2. i know this is blasphemy but i'm just buying my birthday cake this year - prime butcher baker has amazing looking and tasting cakes

        1 Reply
        1. re: ahuva

          Sacher torte is easy to make KFP. So is cheesecake.

        2. Angel food? Heavy on the egg whites, but it's what I leap to when I think of Pesach, since the cake meal is fairly minimal in quantity and the bulk is due to the egg whites.

          1. My mother makes a pretty good apple cake on Passover. Might take me a few days but if you are interested I could get the recipe.

            1. Pavlova.

              1. Claudia Roden has a truly fabulous Pesach cake. Light and flavorful, ingredients limited to oranges, almonds, sugar and eggs. It requires a blender or food processor or a lot of mincing.

                It's not difficult, just a tad time-consuming. p. 286 of the 1999 NY Times Passover cookbook.

                1 Reply
                1. re: AdinaA

                  Here is Claudia Roden's orange-almond cake (works well with other citrus, too; I have made it with Meyer lemons): http://events.nytimes.com/recipes/325...

                2. Would celebrating the child's Jewish birthday instead of his/her Gregorian one solve the problem, or only make it worse (every year instead of only a third of years)?

                  5 Replies
                  1. re: zsero

                    My kid was born erev Pesach (literally - about 5 hours before the seder). We have not yet had to deal with her English birthday coming out on Pesach, but I believe it will happen next year. In our case, we definitely would prefer to use the Gregorian calendar. But I'm happy to see that there are so many options for cakes. I would love to hear how this works out.

                    1. re: rockycat

                      Years ago when i was mulling over celebrating a Gregorian or Jewish date for my anniversary, I happened to mention the question to another member of the Jewish Folk Chorus. A lovely woman almost 80 then over 20 years ago. She and her mother had together survived Auschwitz. She gave me this advice which I pass on in her memory at every opportunity:

                      Celebrate them both!! Celebrate every chance you get. You have to go out looking for joy. Sorrow will find you all by itself.

                      Ever since, we celebrated by both calendars.
                      Happy and Kosher Pesach to everyone

                      1. re: lburrell

                        Thank you for sharing that, lburrell!

                        1. re: AeroDoe

                          yes, so true, and a good reminder.

                          1. re: magiesmom

                            Saw this on a Pesach Recipe board from Mispacha Magazine- There is a frosting, but I don't have it yet:

                            1 tsp baking soda
                            half tsp vinegar
                            5 eggs
                            1 and half cups sugar
                            1 cup oil
                            1 tsp vanilla
                            half cup cocoa powder
                            pinch coffee
                            3/4 cup potato starch
                            Preheat oven to 350
                            In a small bol, combine the baking soda and vinegar.Set aside
                            Place remaining ingredients in the bowl of your mixer. Add vinegar mixture. Beat untill well combined. Pour into a greased 9x13inch baking pan or 2 9inch round pans
                            Bake for 35-40minor intil toothpick inserted in center of cake comes out clean.

                  2. Since the OP found a solution to her immediate issue, I wanted to toss this recipe for orange-alomnd flan out there for general passover desserts: http://www.nytimes.com/2007/03/28/din... .

                    I know the name is entirely unappealing but it is pareve and doesn't need passover stuff that's hard to find. It is silkier than jello and lighter than custard and the ground almonds all gather at the bottom to make a nice almost-crust. I used the extra egg whites to make meringues or matzoh balls.

                    1. My son and I both have birthdays that often fall on Pesach. Our cake of choice has always been the Queen Mother's cake. Some years we have made a sponge cake roll and filled it with an apricot filling that is the same one I make for hamentashen. One year my husband made me a ginger pecan torte with grated fresh ginger, and we made homemade ginger ice cream. (We have a Pesach ice cream maker.) Your choices are only bound by how much you like to bake and how much time you want to spend on the project. If your kids are young, they may be happy with one of the cake mixes. The choices increase every year.

                      2 Replies
                      1. re: veggielover

                        We always make a sponge cake into Strawberry shortcake...nothing like fresh whipped cream!

                        1. re: veggielover

                          My birthday generally falls during Pesach, although this year, it was after. Growing up, mom tried to make Pesach cakes and they usually came out pretty bad. We did have a neighbor who was the best baker in town and her Pesach cakes were fantastic. But both are now long gone and for a number years now, the solution has been to just celebrate my birthday either late or early, depending on when Pesach occurs, to avoid Pesach.

                        2. I made a pavlova with strawberries! Thanks everyone for suggestions!