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Yummy recipe - just have to share. Steamed Korean eggs

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Tried a recipe for Korean steamed eggs. Served it with sauteed chinese sausage and chopped avocado with rice vinegar and a touch of sesame oil.
http://www.thekitchn.com/recipe-korea...

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  1. Thanks for sharing your success, beefa. I saw this recipe on my iPad and was intrigued. It seemed like an very simple way to make eggs for a half dozen or so guests without standing at the stove constantly. Did you make the eggs for one or more diners? Any hints that you learned in your experience, i.e. was the cooking time accurate? etc.
    Thanks.

    2 Replies
    1. re: Sherri

      I made it for 2 and used low sodium stock instead of water in the egg mixture.
      Initially, it takes some attention to make sure the water bath does not boil. The cooking time was accurate -you do have to keep watch to make sure the water does not go above a simmer, but the results were worth it. A custard-like texture with a savory flavor. It went well with spicy, salty, chinese sausages. I think t would be a good foil for other kinds of flavorful foods. It was my first time making it so I could not comment on making it for a larger crowd.

      1. re: beefa

        It's actually a common dish in cantonese & japanese cooking as well.

        For me it's comfort food, made plain, served with oyster sauce. Eaten with rice.
        Variations include putting in (not all at once :-) scallions, thousand year old egg, duck eggs, chinese bbq pork, dry scallops.

        The "secret" to getting the perfect texture is covering the bowl/dish VERY tightly with plastic wrap or some sort air tight lid to prevent the hot steam from getting in. You don't need to worry as much about the steaming time or the waterbath boil by doing so. It can also be done in the microwave.

        My mom also taught me the ratio of egg to water/broth is 1:2 ... using the egg shell to measure the water.