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Lobster tails - 2 of them thawing overnight - how would you cook

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  • Rella Mar 12, 2012 06:19 PM
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Two lobster tails - $19.99 per lb. = $27. I haven't weighed them separately, but they look pretty close in weight, say 9-10 oz. each?

I guess I didn't think how I'm going to cook a thawed lobster tail. How would you cook it tomorrow.

Please ?

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  1. Poached in butter.... or simply baked or broiled.

    8 Replies
    1. re: fourunder

      Does one leave it in the shell when poaching, baking or broiling? Thanks.

      1. re: Rella

        Poaching, remove the shell, which is easily done once thawed. For presentation or visual appeal, leaving the shell is preferred. Baked, you cut the shell from the top to crack it with a chef's knife. Then you lift the flesh out and rest it on top of the shell. You use a small cookie sheet with a little wine and or lemon and bake until the meat is cooked through. For Broiling, you can simply top brown after baking 70-80%, which is finishing under the broiler. You can also cut the shells in half from the underside....again, bake for 70-80% and finish under the broiler. Most restaurants will add Paprika to the lobster to give it some color.

        I forget the site I usually recommend for lobster, but give me a few minutes and I retrieve it for you.

        1. re: Rella

          Here you go....

          http://www.lobsterhelp.com/cooking-lo...

          http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/5967...

          1. re: Rella

            Baked or broiled would be in the shell, with the underside sliced open and slightly splayed, (which requires cracking the back of the shell ), to which you can add butter, lime juice and garlic for broiling, or a range of stuffing for baking, up to buttery shrimp and breadcrumb stuffing. Poached would be shelled first, and provides an option of slicing off a couple ounces from each (these are good sized tails) and making a lobster ceviche beforehand, and enjoying lobster 2 ways.

            1. re: Veggo

              Thanks to you both - I am now equipped to make a decision. I'm so relieved, I can tell you!

              1. re: Veggo

                A simple suggestion: Steaming.

                This is a quick method, avoids any dryness in cooking the tail meat, and is easy to do. The tail meat will come out succulent, colourful, and moist.

                First, use a pair of kitchen shears to cut a line open from the end of the shell tail forward, between the lobster meat and shell. You can see this in the first photo. This will help make it easier to lift the entire tail out of the shell once cooked. But leave it inside the tail to cook it.

                I add the tails to steaming water, but one can also bring them up straight to the boil. You can use anything you like in the steaming water: We add only minced garlic, and lemon wedges. Cooking all was about 10-15 minutes.

                 
                 
              2. re: Rella

                Maybe have a look here
                http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/826098

                If you use paprika (I like), sprinkle after cooking. The broiler or oven can burn the paprika black.

                1. re: porker

                  Thanks, too. I've never been fond of paprika sprinkled on anything -- don't know why. So I won't worry.

            2. Using sharp scissors, cut out and remove the entire underside of the tails - the part with the little leg things. Stick a wooden skewer up thru each tail to prevent curling. Cut off the extra stick, if any. Set up a steamer large enough to hold both tails. Steam them one minute per ounce (individual weight, not collective weight; two 10-ounce tails would be steamed for 10 minutes). Serve with clarified (browned if you like) unsalted butter and kosher salt. Lemon wedges if desired.

              1 Reply
              1. re: sandylc

                Thanks - Oh, that sounds sooo good, too. I'm not going to sleep tonight .... I hope they are good. I've not had good lobster since Nova Scotia too many years ago to remember.