HOME > Chowhound > Cookware >

Discussion

Good Quality Hand Blender

So I'm torn between 2 choices, Krups GPA3 Hand Blender CAD119 or Bamix Mono CAD189. Bamix comes with 150W motor while Krups has 600W motor. 10 years warranty for Bamix and 2 years warranty for Krups. If you have any experience on those two machines, please share it with me. Thanks.

  1. Click to Upload a photo (10 MB limit)
Delete
  1. I don't have user experience. But have you picked up the Bamix? Its heavy. You might check the weights of the two before you make your decision. I'll be keeping up with the comments.

    I wonder what factors have you used to narrow down to these 2 choices? I can't seem to make up my mind about buying one of these?

    Thanks!

    5 Replies
    1. re: sueatmo

      I did a little research on KitchenAid, CuisineArt, Bamix, Braun and Krups. From their reviews, KitchenAid and CuisineArt have a lot of mixed reviews ranging from 5 stars to 1 stars, taken from Amazon website. Braun ends their hand blender lineups in North America that's why I didn't include Braun on the list.

      I'm looking for a good quality hand blender, I might be using it every day. So I'm looking for something that will last years to come. What do you have in mind in terms of hand blender?

      As for trying them out, unfortunately I don't have the chance to try it out. As I couldn't find any stores here in Toronto that sell them. Except for Krups which BestBuy and FutureShop carries them.

      1. re: dennie

        I picked up the Bamix at Williams-Somoma. I think there are W-S stores in Toronto, but of course that doesn't mean they will have the same product mix as in the states. At any rate, I found it so heavy I wondered if I could control it. And I'm fairly strong. Also the Bamix is expensive, and it didn't rate highly with the Consumer Reports recently. I agree that ratings for these on Amazon are really all over the map.

        I've written elsewhere on this board that I have had recent bad experiences with KA small appliances. I doubt I would buy one of their hand mixers.

        I have had good experiences with Cuisinart small appliances, so I guess I a biased toward that brand.

      2. re: sueatmo

        It would be more helpful if you defined "affordable." Years ago, I bought a Black and Decker cordless hand blender because it was "affordable." I think it was around forty bucks, but I can't check it out because they don't make them any more. It was just too wimpy. But I absolutely MUST have cordless. I finally bought a Cuisinart cordless Smart Stick, and I LOVE it! About eighty or ninety bucks, and mine came with all sorts of attachments, most of which I use often.

        1. re: Caroline1

          My bad, never mind the affordable, I'm willing to spend more to get a good hand blender. The problem with wireless, I'm afraid the battery will lose the juice sooner or later, that's why I opted with wired hand blenders. I believe yours is the CSB-78 series from Cuisinart? What do you use it for mostly?

          1. re: dennie

            I'm not sure of the model nummber, but I use it for almost everything. And it has a rechargeable battery that takes a charge quickly and lasts appreciably longer than I ever dreamed it could! I use the little (1 cup?) "chopper" that came with it to do things like "chop" a mirapoix of carrots, onion and celery for soup and to whip up things like a quick tuna salad and many many more. I use the stick blender mode for blending "in the pot." I make a lot of vegetable purees that I pass off as soup, and it does a good job with the cauliflower/cheese and broccoli/cheese soups, but not with the mushroom. To get the really smooth texture with no "graininess" for that, I absolutely have to use my full sized Waring counter-top blender. I haven't yet used it for things like pates, but I suspect it would work there just fine, but a liver mousse might not come out as smooth as I'd like. But the rechargeable battery in it is a non-issue for me.

      3. I got the Dynamic MiniPro and it's pretty darn good. It's a variable speed (dial) and has several different blades. I got it at Katom and it's on sale: http://www.katom.com/048-MX070.html

        See:
        http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/810517
        http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/810839

        1. There are some interesting YouTube videos showing various hand blenders. I found them interesting.

          1. Kitchenaid has one with a DC motor. I have not seen it personally but here is a link:
            http://www.chefscatalog.com/product/2...

            I have an old Daily stick blender that is a dead ringer for Bamix. Made in Italy. Still going strong but I haven't seen one in maybe 10 or 12 years.

            1. Bamix and Krups are obviouisly not measuring the watts the same way or there are considerable ineffeciencies in one motor and in this case I would trust the Bamix number just from the practicallity stand point. The 150W motor is about 0.2 horse power, typical for hand held tools, 600W is 0.8 horse power, about the same as a Kittchenaid stand mixer. Does the Krups motor look like a KA stand mixer, if not, then it's not really 4 times more powerful than the Bamix. Companies try to confuse the consummer with numbers most can't fully understand, it's a marketing ploy in many cases.

              Cords or no cords, that is the question. Cordless is extremely convenient, buy convenience comes at a price. Not so much perhaps in actual dollars, but in dollars per performance and longevity. Cordless tools do not have the power of their corded counterparts and are typically more expensive for the same level of performance. In other words a $100 cordless tool will have performance (power) of a $25 corded tool. I sure there are exceptions if one looks long enough, but in general that's what you get. The other thing is batteries, even the rechargable ones, will eventually die and they tend to be either difficult or expensive or both, to replace. Obviously, the length of time they last is dependent on several factors, such as how much they are used and if they are allowed to totally discharge or not, and the type of battery they are, but they all die. You would consider yourself fortunate if the batteries lasted 8-10 years. In the case of a hand blender, there are usually outlets conveniently located throughout the kitchen, so that shouldn't be a big issue. It's not like you have to run 50 feet of extension cord to drill one hole that takes 30 seconds to drill.

              We have a Bamix, not sure the model, and we really like it. Mrs. mikie has never mentioned it being too heavy. It's a wonderful kitchen tool.

              1. I've been watching YouTube videos of Bamix hand blenders, and am developing a serious crush. Quite remarkable they are.

                1. The Kenwood/Delonghi HB723/HB724 is a good model I recommend (I own it). But I agree with mikie about the power numbers, they seem untrustable: the Kenwood and Delonghi seem to be the exact same product, but the power rating is 700W for Kenwood and 380W only for Delonghi.

                  1. I bought the Cuisinart SmartStick hand blender a few years ago and I love it. It has a detachable blade and it is powerful. It comes with a plastic measuring beaker to use it with. I think I bought it at Domus Kitchen Store in Ottawa for around $45.

                    2 Replies
                    1. re: ladooShoppe

                      The beaker that comes with the Smart Stick is meant more as a blending container than a measuring cup. The markings are correct when the stick is the beaker, not when empty. The markings are useful when adding ingredients while blending them, but don't use it as a measuring cup. I first realized this when I used the beaker to measure water for rice, and the rice turned out overly wet.

                      1. re: ladooShoppe

                        I just bought this for $50.00. So far I've used it for pureeing bean soup, and it worked well. I had watched some related videos, and though I fell in love with the Bamix, I just couldn't justify paying that much.

                        I have bread crumbs to make tonight, so I intend to crumb bread with the chopper/grinder. This would be a bit easier than using the food processor. I used this for a fast chop of garlic when I made the soup. Faster for a fine dice with a knife, when you don't need a pretty dice.

                        Of course I'll know more about its strengths and limitations as I keep using it. I saw that, while it will make smoothies with ice, the ice should be crushed. The recipes provided by Cuisinart use frozen fruit for smoothies, rather than ice.

                        And LS, when do you use a blunt blade? Or do you? I didn't see anything about when I would switch to blunt--only a mention that this was possible. Thanks!

                      2. I have a KitchenAid wand blender, and it works fine for my casual use. Maybe it's even tougher. But I do want to say that wattage numbers are meaningless (as mikie also suggests). Less efficient motors use many watts to do less work than more efficient (but more expensive) motors do. With motors, you get what you pay for.

                        1. So I decided to get the Bamix Ultra, for the longer shaft and 200W motor. I'll give a mini review when I received it later.