HOME > Chowhound > General Topics >

Discussion

Boiled eggs and gas/bloating

  • 5

I'm not sure if this is the right place but you guys are the most knowledgeable food chemistry people I know. In a nut shell -when I eat boiled eggs I get horrible, painful gas. But when I eat scrambled eggs (in the microwave) I don't.

I found this answer online:
<i>when an egg is boiled in it's shell there is no where for the gasses to escape. The frying of an egg is done outside of the shell(generally anyway) allowing the gases to leave. Not so in a boiled egg. they are all trapped inside and released when you ingest them. I chop mine up and add butter, salt and pepper and heat in the microwave. Wa la not so much burping and STUFF</i>

but it doesn't ring true to me.

Anyone have any other ideas? (Not to mention suggestions to relieve the gas pain/pressure)

  1. Click to Upload a photo (10 MB limit)
Delete
  1. There is a little air bubble under the shell of an uncooked egg. To reduce the chance of a boiling egg cracking, some people poke a little hole in the shell to reduce air pressure in this pocket. But amount of air in the egg, whether in this pocket or not, is not enough to produce bloating. You could easily swallow that much air in a couple of gulps.

    I wonder if sulfur in the egg is giving you problems. Rotten eggs smell of hydrogen sulfide, and the green band around some hardboiled yolks is attributed to sulfur compounds. It could be that scrambling lets those sulfur compounds dissipate. Do onions, especially raw or lightly cooked ones give you problems. Sulfur compounds are blamed for making you cry when cutting onions, and for the sharp taste of onions.

    Cabbage and related vegetables also have sulfur compounds. However, a quick scan on that subject suggests that this sulfur may increase the smell, but not amount of intestinal gas.

    3 Replies
    1. re: paulj

      My sister in law swears that hard boiled eggs are supposed to give you gas, but I've never found that to be true. And I don't have the strongest stomach. I do cool them down in ice water quickly so they don't get that greenish grey sulfur ring, maybe that's why? I thought she was the only one. I mean, they do SMELL like gas sometimes.....

      1. re: paulj

        No problems with onions!!
        How would you poke a hole in the egg shell?
        The egg was cold and had been in the fridge.

        1. re: DebinD

          A push pin works great to punch holes. I actually have a little tool made especially for that purpose. Plastic, about the size of a shot glass with a retractable needle on one end. It was a gift and I make HB eggs pretty often so it remains in my kitchen.

      2. Pickled/deviled eggs and draft beer, methane city!