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Pressure cookers - electric or stovetop?

c
charmdesign Feb 21, 2012 10:52 AM

I'm wanting to buy a pressure cooker and wondering what you guys recommend as far as electric or stove top model? I need to buy at Kohls since I'm working with a gift card. Plan to make enough food for 4-6, mostly vegetable such as cauliflower or broccoli until I get more versed in recipes for it.

electric: http://www.kohls.com/kohlsStore/kitchen/electrics/cookers_steamers/pressure_cookers/PRD~986899/Fagor+6qt+Electric+Pressure+Cooker+Plus.jsp

or stovetop: (diff size options here

)

http://www.kohls.com/upgrade/webstore/product_page.jsp?PRODUCT%3C%3Eprd_id=845524892618807&crosssell=true

http://www.kohls.com/kohlsStore/kitchen/cookware/pressurecookers/stainlesssteel/PRD~c17386/Fagor+Splendid+Stainless+Steel+Pressure+Cookers.jsp

http://www.kohls.com/kohlsStore/kitch...

  1. d
    debbypo Sep 30, 2012 07:44 PM

    I had a Fagor stove top for years but seldom used it. I was nervous and uptight about it. Bought the 3-in-1 last year and I really like it. I've made a lot more of my own stock and it has done a great job on stew and grains as well. Also, canned beans, with their excess sodium, are a thing of the past. I highly recommend the electric one.

    1. c
      charmdesign Feb 23, 2012 05:14 AM

      Thanks for the advice! Space is an issue. Sound like the stove top is more versatile and faster anyway!

      2 Replies
      1. re: charmdesign
        t
        Tudor_rose Sep 27, 2012 06:32 PM

        Sorry I'm late to the conversation, but I just found this. I have always had electric pressure cookers. They typically get up to only 10 PSI and stove top ones get up to 15 PSI. The one good thing about electric pressure cookers is that you can walk away from them, and set them to run for only a certain time. I don't think you can do this with a stove top one. You also don't have to futz with the electric ones to maintain the appropriate temperature. However, I've always wanted to try a stove top one. Maybe one day.

        1. re: Tudor_rose
          paulj Sep 28, 2012 07:44 PM

          From what I've read, the electric ones actually control the temperature, keeping it around 240F, which is equivalent to the 10psi. It's cheaper to use a temperature sensor than a pressure sensor. One blogger hacked an electric PC to run at a higher temperature (and pressure).

      2. Candy Feb 22, 2012 01:52 PM

        I know the temptation to buy the Fagor 3 in 1 can be strong but buy the stove top model unless you don't have space for a PC, Slow cooker, and rice cooker and would use them. I have two stove top models, a 6 qt and a 10qt. The stove top model obtain higher pressure than the electric there for are faster. I don't have time for slow cookers and I have no problem making rice. I sell both kinds of Fagors and stove top is my preference.

        1. m
          Miss Priss Feb 21, 2012 01:24 PM

          I much prefer the stovetop type. In my opinion, they're more versatile than the electric ones: you can brown food in them and they can double as regular pots. Also, they don't take up precious counter space in my very small kitchen; they typically don't have nonstick interiors (most electric ones do); and very little can go wrong with them that can't be easily and inexpensively fixed. Of the three stovetop models you linked to, I'd recommend going with whichever Fagor best fits your budget. The Food Network cooker looks identical to one that I recently saw for sale elsewhere, and the manual indicated that it operated at a high pressure of 11.6 psi, not the US standard of 15 psi. I'm willing to bet that it's a generic cooker marketed under multiple different brand names. The Fagors do operate at 15 psi (though the Duo also has a low pressure setting of, I think, 8 psi). They're also very easy to use. Hope this helps.

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