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Sushi

d
Doctormhl1 Feb 20, 2012 10:05 AM

What is sushi? Is it basically rice with either fish or vegetables enclosed within, or is it fish or vegetables held together by rice? What's the "nafkamina" ? What Bracha does one make on eating sushi? Thanks.

  1. g
    ganeden Feb 20, 2012 08:42 PM

    Sushi is rice. Often, it is served with other things. To us, it's mezonos/ Borei nefashos. So the question always is what is the icar, what is the tofel. There can be no question that the very nature of sushi makes the rice, generally, the icar. Unless one is eating it specifically for the other ingredients.

    1. b
      brooklynkoshereater Feb 20, 2012 07:23 PM

      Sushi is a clump of rice, a little wasabi, and a piece of raw fish on the outside. the rolls we are used to are referred to as "inside out rolls" by sushi-purists. I think, according to Rav Moshe Feinstein zt"l, it's best to make separate berachot on the fish and the rice.

      1 Reply
      1. re: brooklynkoshereater
        l
        lburrell Feb 20, 2012 08:35 PM

        Please do not confuse "sushi" which is a combination of flavored rice (sugar, vinegar, mirin) and other ingredients rolled or wrapped. Or, as in "scattered sushi rice salad," scattered. Sashimi is raw fish or seafood. Vegans and many others who don't want to eat raw fish or various kinds of sea food enjoy sushi regularly. Some people put umboshi plum or wasabi in as well. Others prefer the wasabi on the side so they can regulate the "kick."

      2. f
        ferret Feb 20, 2012 10:35 AM

        There is no "right" answer to this question. "Sushi" refers to a football-shaped nugget of rice topped with something (usually a thin slice of fish but nowadays can be a variety of no-fish items. Sashimi is the sliced fish absent rice and maki is what most people are used to, namely rice (and sometimes dried seaweed) wrapped around fish and/or vegetables. In the dishes that are prepared with rice, the rice is usually considered dominant (although I've seen arguments to the contrary) but you're always best consulting your local rabbi.

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