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Flour For Making Pasta

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I know i need "#1 fine", but is there anything else I need to know about which flour I actually need?
Does it even matter which flour I use?
I'm in southern ontario, canada (near hamilton), and a specific brand would very helpful.
Thanks in advance

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  1. I bought mine at the Safeway on Denman and Broad in Vancouver Canada.
    Try Safeway first and if not Capers is Whole Foods in Canada right?
    They have it there too.

    Semolina

    http://www.iherb.com/Bob-s-Red-Mill-S...

    1. I have always just used AP flour, usually with 1/3 semolina but sometimes not. It will be good either way.

      1. You can make pasta with any flour really and you'll be fine. (Okay - I've never tried pastry flour but it could work potentially).

        I typically use all purpose flour (and I make a lot of pasta). I do on occasion stock up on "00" flour (Kind Arthur makes an Italian flour which approximates 00 flour). I typically only use 00 flour for flat noodles. I don't actually like the more delicate texture when I'm making ravioli/etc.

        I'm assuming we are taking about hand rolled pasta, as opposed to extruded, and that we are not talking about drying pasta for extended storage. . . .

        1. I third the suggestion for plain old all purpose flour. Even if Canadian flour is slightly different, it should work just fine. You can get the hang of it with cheap ingredients, and if you become a master pasta maker, you may learn to appreciate the subtleties.

          1. I agree with the fact you only need all-purpose unless you've done it 1,000 times and are looking for a change. Whatever cheap store brand at your local store will do; I use it all the time for both stuffed and cut pasta.

            1. I mostly use bread flour (King Arthur brand). I've tried 00 a couple of times and I can't say I notice any difference. You can add some semolina flour if you like, but if you add too much the dough will be too hard to work unless you have industrial strength equipment.