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Upper East Side - then Tribeca? Plus lots of other questions:)

p
PerfectPalate Feb 15, 2012 07:47 PM

Hi fellow foodies. We are coming to NYC for 18 days and nights of good eating for our 20th anniversary. Definitely staying in Tribeca for 9 nights and either Upper East Side or Noho for the other 9. My questions are:
- Is the Upper East Side ok as an area food wise - we love mixing it up with casual and fine dinning (see below) and if so what recommendations?
- We love the likes of Flour and Water and also Commonwealth in San Francisco. We would like to mix up our food and flavours and challenge our pallets as well try some old goodies. What recommendations in Tribeca, NoHo (and also Upper East Side if you consider it worthy)?

We are looking thinking about:
- Locanda Verde
- Marc Forgione
- Corton
- Bouley
- Blue Ribbon
- Per Se
- DBGB

We want to mix up fine dining, southern (we don't get that in NZ), both high and lower end Mexican, possibly Cuban, Italian (in the style of the great Italian food movies)...

A few questions (sorry). When they say jacket in a restaurant is a tie required? Which are the best foodie farmers markets? Are there any exceptional high teas in NYC and if so then where AND where are the best places in NYC for weekend brunch?

Thanks for your help - can't wait to visit (and eat). Arriving May 6

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  1. ellenost RE: PerfectPalate Feb 15, 2012 08:31 PM

    Love Bouley, Corton and Per Se for high end dining.

    No restaurant in NYC requires a tie for gentlemen.

    I live on the UES, and there are some very good local restaurants. I like Wa Jeal for Chinese food, and Cafe d'Alsace for French/Alsatian food. Cafe Sabarsky in the Neue Gallery is charming for Austrian fare (more for breakfast/lunch/dessert).

    Union Square Green Market is one of the most famous outdoor farmers' markets. You should also check out Chelsea Market (indoors) for some excellent shops.

    I've always enjoyed Artisanal for weekend brunch. It is a loud large brasserie that specializes in cheese. Wide selection of both brunch/lunch fare. Reservations are highly recommended.

    -----
    Union Square Greenmarket
    Broadway and E 17th St, New York, NY 10003

    Artisanal
    2 Park Avenue, New York, NY 10016

    Cafe Sabarsky
    1048 5th Ave, New York, NY 10028

    Cafe d'Alsace
    1695 2nd Ave, New York, NY 10128

    Corton
    239 West Broadway, New York, NY 10013

    Bouley
    163 Duane St, New York, NY 10013

    Wa Jeal
    1588 2nd Ave, New York, NY 10028

    1. k
      kathryn RE: PerfectPalate Feb 15, 2012 08:48 PM

      Wow, New Zealand! 18 days sounds like a wonderful trip to NYC.

      How often do you get to NYC?

      Your list seems short on only in NY foods: bagels and smoked salmon, pastrami on rye, hot dogs & papaya juice, black and white cookies, cheesecake, egg creams, pickles, halal carts, pizza...

      Have you already visited classic NY places like Russ & Daughters, Katz's Deli, 2nd Avenue Deli, John's of Bleecker, Keens, etc.?

      > - Is the Upper East Side ok as an area food wise - we love mixing it up with casual and fine dinning (see below) and if so what recommendations?

      I would personally stay in Noho because it is within a very easy walk of the Lower East Side, East Village, Nolita, Soho, West Village, etc. Lots of great restaurants and in a very concentrated area, with tons of train lines. Noho is actually a pretty small neighborhood, geographically, but contains a fair number of dining destinations in Noho or right on the border. Hecho en Dumbo, Il Buco, Bohemian, DBGB, Peels, Pulino's, Chinatown Brasserie, Acme, Five Points (good brunch), Saxon + Parole, Forcella. Oh and the newly opened Bowery Coffee.

      It's not that the UES is bad (in fact if you have a special interest in fine dining, you'll find excellent choices on the UES), it's just a lot more spread out and less convenient. Especially over the course of 9 days. What intersection/cross-streets? UES is actually pretty large.

      > We are looking thinking about:

      I don't think there's a bad restaurant on your list but it does not seem to be all that challenging -- Italian, American, etc. Mostly European style cuisine. No Japanese, Chinese, Thai, or creative Asian like a Momofuku restaurant, Wong, Fatty Cue, etc.

      My favorite unique places in NY serve Xian (Chinese) food, Issan (Thai) food, organic/local/sustainable Japanese BBQ, authentic Basque (Spanish) tapas, creative diner food, pretzels, hot dogs, halal food, steak, upscale rustic Italian, Italian subs, creative Italian-American, high end non-sushi Japanese (like kaiseki), creative desserts, molecular gastronomy, mixology/creative cocktails, and upscale brunches (brunch is served every day here, sometimes even for dinner).

      My favorites are here:
      http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/8050...

      > We want to mix up fine dining, southern (we don't get that in NZ), both high and lower end Mexican, possibly Cuban, Italian (in the style of the great Italian food movies)...

      For American regional foods, like Southern, BBQ, and lobster rolls, I might look into Pies 'n' Thighs, the Redhead, Amy Ruth's (for chicken and waffles), Blue Smoke, Hill Country, Pearl Oyster Bar, or Luke's Lobster. There's also the delicious Asian-inspired BBQ at Fatty Cue.

      Torrisi Italian Specialties is also serving a tasting menu based upon foods from New York's past that I've heard great things about.

      You might be interested in this recent thread on the best "Latin" restaurant -- we have more than just Mexican:
      http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/833555

      Best Italian? You'll have to elaborate as I'm not clear as to what you mean by food movies. It REALLY depends what you're looking for. Especially in terms of atmosphere and style of dining. More fine dining or upscale rustic or more of a neighborhood restaurant feel?

      > When they say jacket in a restaurant is a tie required?

      No restaurants require ties in NYC any more.

      > Which are the best foodie farmers markets?

      There's really only one big one. Union Square Greenmarket, 8-6 on Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, Saturdays, for Manhattan. Saturday is the best day to go.

      The other big one I can think of is in Brooklyn (and therefore off topic for this board).

      Take a look at this what's-in-season list right before your visit to see what they have currently:
      http://www.grownyc.org/files/gmkt/uns...

      For food stores: I like Chelsea Market, Despana (Spanish), Union Sq Greenmarket, Kalustyan's (for spices), Murray's Cheese/Meats, Zabar's, Russ & Daughters, Eataly (best on weekdays at off hours since it is also full of restaurants and gets crowded at meal times).

      More foodie markets (not necessarily farmers markets
      )http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/831071

      My list of great NYC or made in NYC food stuffs to take home:
      http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/8107...

      High tea
      http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/830986

      Best brunch
      http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/831766

      Additionally, you should note that many restaurants serve weekday breakfast/brunch so you don't need to wait for Saturday/Sunday.

      Some of these are The Breslin, Locanda Verde, Maialino, Shopsin's (closed Mon/Tues), Clinton St Baking Company, Peels, Sarabeth's, Balthazar, Joseph Leonard, 'ino. And you won't have to deal with the weekend crowds at many of these.

      http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/833022

      Don't leave NY without eating these foods
      http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/610739

      I highly recommend RGR's self guided Lower East Side Gustatory tour but sub in Pickle Guys for Guss' Pickles and note that Economy Candy's address is incorrect:
      http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/493333

      2 Day NYC Tour focusing on eating, please help with suggestions...
      http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/809852

      Restaurant Advice for 2 day trip to NYC
      http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/8050...

      For non-Western European/American
      http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/729498
      http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/731732

      Foreign Street Grub
      http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/701278

      totally obscure, odd, and intriguing menu items
      http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/722130

      -----
      Russ & Daughters
      179 E Houston St, New York, NY 10002

      Katz's Delicatessen
      205 E Houston St, New York, NY 10002

      Murray's Cheese
      254 Bleecker St, New York, NY 10014

      Kalustyan's
      123 Lexington Ave, New York, NY 10016

      Pearl Oyster Bar
      18 Cornelia St, New York, NY 10014

      Union Square Greenmarket
      Broadway and E 17th St, New York, NY 10003

      Despana
      408 Broome St, New York, NY 10013

      Hill Country
      30 W 26th St, New York, NY 10010

      Keens
      72 West 36th St., New York, NY 10018

      Momofuku Ssam Bar
      207 2nd Ave, New York, NY 10003

      Amy Ruth's
      113 W 116th St, New York, NY 10026

      Shopsin's General Store
      120 Essex St, New York, NY 10002

      Zabar's
      2245 Broadway, New York, NY 10024

      Balthazar
      80 Spring St, New York, NY 10012

      Five Points
      31 Great Jones St, New York, NY 10012

      Second Avenue Deli
      162 E 33rd St, New York, NY 10016

      'ino
      21 Bedford St, New York, NY 10014

      Chinatown Brasserie
      380 Lafayette St, New York, NY 10012

      Sarabeth's
      423 Amsterdam Avenue, New York, NY 10024

      Il Buco
      47 Bond St., New York, NY 10012

      John's Pizzeria
      278 Bleecker St, New York, NY 10014

      Blue Smoke
      116 East 27th Street, New York, NY 10016

      Acme
      9 Great Jones St, New York, NY 10012

      The Redhead
      349 E 13th St, New York, NY 10003

      Locanda Verde
      377 Greenwich St, New York, NY 10013

      DBGB
      299 Bowery, New York, NY 10003

      Clinton Street Baking Co.
      4 Clinton St, New York, NY 10002

      Joseph Leonard
      170 Waverly Pl, New York, NY 10014

      Luke's Lobster
      93 E 7th St, New York, NY 10009

      The Breslin
      20 W 29th St, New York, NY 10001

      Maialino
      2 Lexington Avenue, New York, NY 10010

      Torrisi Italian Specialties
      250 Mulberry St, New York, NY 10012

      Pulino's
      282 Bowery, New York, NY 10012

      Hecho en Dumbo
      354 Bowery, New York, NY 10012

      Bohemian
      57 Great Jones St, New York, NY 10012

      Peels
      325 Bowery, New York, NY 10003

      Eataly
      200 5th Ave, New York, NY 10010

      Forcella
      334 Bowery, New York, NY 10012

      Fatty 'Cue
      50 Carmine St, New York, NY 10014

      Wong
      7 Cornelia St, New York, NY 10014

      Bowery Coffee
      89 E Houston St, New York, NY 10012

      Saxon + Parole
      316 Bowery, New York, NY 10012

      2 Replies
      1. re: kathryn
        b
        BrettLove RE: kathryn Feb 16, 2012 01:02 PM

        Wow! These NYC Chowhounds can bring it like nobody's business! I'd love to add that Bouley's ($55) luncheon "tasting" (but with choices, à la prix-fixe, and no "supplemental charges" - a pet peeve of mine) still has me perplexed as to how they can make any money on it. I suppose their regulars order à la carte, and get bottles of wine, etc., but I was blown away by the relative value of it when I last visited from Boston, earlier this month. They don't skimp on "high end" ingredients, and while I've never had dinner there, I presume the food quality was at least comparable to dinner service.
        Jung Sik (in Tribeca, as well) was my "best"/favorite overall meal of 2011.

        -----
        Bouley
        163 Duane St, New York, NY 10013

        Jung Sik
        2 Harrison St, New York, NY 10013

        1. re: kathryn
          p
          PerfectPalate RE: kathryn Feb 16, 2012 01:35 PM

          Thank you sooo much for the great ideas everyone. Really appreciated. Will let you know where we go - and what we love. It all looks so good and your ideas are really helpful. Can't wait:)

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