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Is There Any Commonplace Dish You've Never Eaten?

LOCKED DISCUSSION

I've never had a peanut butter and jelly sandwich.

Never tried oysters in any shape or form.

Never eaten Brussels sprouts, peaches, strawberries and cherries.

Never tried pate de foie gras or caviar.

  1. I've never had a tuna noodle casserole
    Once I had a bite of a tuna melt sandwich and nearly tossed my cookies on the spot, from that point on, I came to the immediate realization that I cannot stomach warm, canned tuna in any form

    You're missing out on peaches, strawberries and cherries, Perilagu Khan!

    48 Replies
    1. re: cgarner

      I've never had tuna noodle casserole either! And I have no desire, really! It sounds disgusting.

        1. re: gator28

          Agreed. Never had and will never have a tuna noodle casserole (I do, however, feed tuna to my cats).

          And agreed, PK is missing out on peaches . . . especially locally grown from a farmer's market.

        2. re: cgarner

          The beloved cook at my summer camp in Maine, in what I think was an ill-fated attempt to use up some stuff in the kitchen, tried serving tuna casserole once. He was almost lynched.

          This was 35 years ago, and you can still get a laugh when you mention Frank's tuna casserole.

          1. re: cgarner

            I like a good tuna melt but the idea of the noodle casserole turns my stomach.

            1. re: cgarner

              Like most things tuna noodle casserole can by yummy if done properly with melted cheese, mushrooms, and bread crumbs.

              1. re: thirtyeyes

                Correct. It is no different from any cheap comfort food. It is all about method. Even if you don't like the nutritional profile, done right, it can be filling and good. That's what the dish is--American peasant food.

                1. re: sueatmo

                  When I was a kid, I wouild have killed for the tuna noodle casseroles they ate at my friend's houses. We always had protein centered meals, salads, veggies... first thing I think I made for myself when I got out of the house... I would never eat it now, but those casseroles and foil TV dinners with the compartments looked like heaven to me then.

                  1. re: mcf

                    I think I've made tuna noodle casserole, but it would have been so long ago, I can't remember. I know I've tasted tuna noodle casserole, and I remember thinking it wasn't bad.

                    1. re: sueatmo

                      I used to inhale it. Made up for lost childhood hot dishes.

                    2. re: mcf

                      Me too! I remember going to a friend's house for dinner: Hamburger Helper Potato Stroganoff, with frozen peas added. I was so impressed! We just got dumb old roasts and vegetables and homemade bread and stuff.

                      1. re: Jeri L

                        Your poor mother was trying to cook good nutritious food for you, and you would have rather had Hamburger Helper instead! ;-D

                          1. re: sueatmo

                            Oh, there's another one. Never had Hamburger Helper. (But lots of those TV dinners with the compartments - eaten on metal folding TV tables - lots of fond memories there!!)

                            1. re: jbsiegel

                              I've never used Hamburger Helper, and I don't think my mom did either. I can't remember when that product came out.

                                1. re: goodhealthgourmet

                                  This would have been something that I saw advertised early in my marriage. I don't remember ever actually buying it.

                                  1. re: sueatmo

                                    I have always cooked a good dinner every night, and a couple times my ex wanted Hamburger Helper, raving about how much he loved it, so I made it for him. He still raved about it, so I bought 6 boxes of different flavors and served them to him every night that week.
                                    He never asked for Hamburger Helper again.

                              1. re: jbsiegel

                                Had It once at a friend's house for lunch leftover. This same friend introduced me to kraft Mac and cheese which I would beg for.

                                SO loves HH and it is one of the only meals he makes. It's been a year or two but he will make the beef pasta flavor and add extra beef and more noodles plus chili powder and seasoning salt. My mother never made it once though.

                    3. re: cgarner

                      Lucky you, never to have had tuna noodle casserole! Like you, I cannot abide heated, tinned tuna.

                      And there is nothing like the flavour of perfectly ripe peaches, strawberries, and cherries....unless it's REAL tomatoes, picked whilst still warm from the sun. Sigh. Cravings happening here.

                      1. re: shygirl

                        Never had a 'mater off the vine either.

                        1. re: Perilagu Khan

                          Well, they are wonderful, but hard to come by unless you know someone who raises them in his/her backyard, or you raise them yourself.

                          Even the tomatoes you buy in farmers' markets aren't the same, although they are better than supermarket tomatoes almost always.

                          1. re: Perilagu Khan

                            this is probably the post in this thread that i feel the most sympathy for.

                            there is absolutely NOTHING better than a mater fresh off the vine

                            1. re: mattstolz

                              +1
                              With Duke's, on good white bread, over the kitchen sink.

                              1. re: mattstolz

                                Especially when you are a kid and the mater is pilfered!

                            2. re: shygirl

                              Agreed, there is nothing to compare with a fresh tomato, still warm from the sun!

                              And I feel somewhat sorry for Perilagu Khan, who's never felt juices dripping down the chin from a perfectly ripe sweet peach. One of the greatest G-rated sloppy experiences that life has to offer...

                              It's hard to imagine how someone could reach adulthood without ever tasting strawberries. Or cherries. As with other fruits, underripe ones are pretty ho-hum, but fresh ripe ones are just out of this world. Unless it's a case of having avoided them deliberately for one reason or another, I strongly recommend giving 'em a try this year- get some fresh strawberries from a farmer's market this June and you won't be sorry. Better yet, go to an organic farm out in the country and pick them yourself! Fresh-picked is always the best fruit experience.

                              1. re: eclecticsynergy

                                To be fair, and at least before very recent times, if you grew up in a country NOT located in the parts of the Western World/USA/UK/etc that specifically grew and savored strawberries - you were quite unlikely to have tasted fresh whole strawberries. Strawberry jam & preserves, perhaps, especially if your family had some financial means. Or if you had the privileged upbringing (and fortune) to visit some farm in the misty (and suitably cool) highlands or area of some country where strawberries were grown as a specialty crop for (e.g.) the expatriate population, especially in former British Colonial countries.

                                1. re: huiray

                                  I just wanted to say thank you for saying this. I am a fervent believer in the idea of good food for all, but am sometimes disturbed at the way people sometimes talk about food as though there is one universal (generally Western and first world) experience and way of going about things, and not taking into accounts issues like classism and ethnocentricity.

                                  1. re: raisingirl

                                    Speaking of ethnocentrism, I wonder how many people on this board have had cassava, one of the world's most important staple foods, in a form other than tapioca.

                                    1. re: FoodPopulist

                                      Cassava/Manihot chips and Pacu steaks - Fish and Chips in Brazil! :-) Yum!

                                      1. re: raisingirl

                                        You're welcome.

                                        Yes, it sometimes is disturbing how folks on Chowhound talk about stuff as if the U.S. of A. constitutes the entire universe.

                                        1. re: huiray

                                          Doesn't one tend to see things through the lens of one's country of origin?

                                          and not everybody travels....

                                          1. re: RUK

                                            Exactly. And I think it's safe to say a good 90% of posters on this site are Americans. It's not *gasp!* "ethnocentrism" or "classism" or any other silly ism, it's experience and pragmatism.

                                            1. re: Perilagu Khan

                                              Exactly PK. Well said. We have to start from a "common place" or there would be no use in a discussion on the topic you started:

                                              "Is There Any COMMONPLACE Dish You've Never Eaten?"

                                              1. re: ttoommyy

                                                Then it might have been useful for the OP to have mentioned in his initial post that he was thinking of the USA specifically or whatever sphere of the world he had in mind. After all, this thread is appearing in the General Chowhounding Topics board, which is supposed to be open for discussions from around the globe and by folks from any place. Isn't CH supposed to be a global forum, even if most of the participants happen to be from the USA?

                                                The contretemps about strawberries, for example, as reflected in the language used in the posts is indicative of the assumption that this fruit is altogether a common fresh fruit freely available to all denizens of the entire world whoever they may be and whatever their circumstances. That is simply not so.

                                                1. re: huiray

                                                  It is a given that the frame of reference here is the US. If I were on a food site where 90% of the posters were Chinese and a poster started a thread such as this where everybody referred to foods common in China, I don't think I'd whine.

                                                  1. re: Perilagu Khan

                                                    Yet it is a global forum.

                                                    I made an observation about the assumptions of the posters here regarding the universality of strawberries and pointed out that it would not have been freely available in all parts of the world, and later remarked about the USA/Western-centric responses on a global forum. Other posters also agreed with me. Elsewhere here in this thread there has been discussion about non-universality of peanut butter by another poster. Your attitude suggests that even mentioning such things are not allowed. I would hardly qualify my responses as "whining" but you're entitled to your opinion.

                                                    As for that other food site you speculated about, would that be a China-specific forum or a global forum?

                                                    1. re: huiray

                                                      Of course it's a global forum. What are the administrators going to do? Block all IPs that don't originate in the US? But functionally, by virtue of where 90% of the posters call home, this is an American forum with American frames of reference. So-called Western/USA-centric responses are to be expected. But perhaps we should affix an automatic caveat to all our posts stating, "I understand my response reflects a Western bias springing from living in the U.S. and is not intended to slight the cultural practices, preferences and beliefs on the non-Western world." Perhaps this would salve your dainty sensibilities.

                                                  2. re: huiray

                                                    I apologize, but when I post here I assume most people are in the US since there are boards for other parts of the world. I also assume that someone living in say, Croatia for example, who does not speak or write English as a first or even second language is not visiting this forum. If I am stupid and close-minded for thinking so, so be it.

                                                    1. re: ttoommyy

                                                      If there are boards for other countries, shouldn't that alert us to the fact that the CH population is international and that folks from many places might be posting and reading on the topical boards? I've seen many from around the world participating on topic boards.

                                                      1. re: mcf

                                                        I guess. I never looked at it that way. Call me egocentric. I can take it. :)

                                                        1. re: ttoommyy

                                                          Ethnocentric. ETHNOcentric. Get with the program and learn all those isms you use to oppress The Other. ;)

                                                          1. re: Perilagu Khan

                                                            Even here on Trafalmadore, we have special foods, but still I often crave meat loaf and mashed potatoes.
                                                            So it goes!

                                                2. re: Perilagu Khan

                                                  You are correct. I was going to post that I have never eaten lutefisk but I thought someone would reply that it is not commonplace. Well, In much of Minnesota between Thanksgiving and Christmas lutefisk is ubiquitous. The family of one of my SILs even cooks it in their home every Christmas. Most people I know eat it at the church suppers. I wonder how I have managed to avoid it all these years?

                                                3. re: RUK

                                                  Not just country, but family, community, schooling, etc... environment and experience.

                                      2. re: cgarner

                                        Me neither on the Tuna Noodle Casserole. I don't mind tuna, but the thought of tinned tuna... in a cream sauce... over noodles... I'm not hungry thanks.

                                      3. I didn't try a peanut butter and jelly sandwich until college. I was underwhelmed.

                                        1. Tuna noodle casserole
                                          Egg salad
                                          Deviled eggs
                                          Eggs Benedict (see a theme emerging <g>)

                                          10 Replies
                                          1. re: Janet from Richmond

                                            @Janet, are you allergic to eggs, or just have an aversion to them?

                                            1. re: cgarner

                                              An aversion....a real aversion. ::::shudder::::: The only way I can eat eggs are if the white and yolk head out into the world as one, thoroughly cooked and there's a lot of cheese and meat or veggies involved (quiche, frittata, breakfast casseroles).

                                              1. re: Janet from Richmond

                                                is it the yolk or the white that bothers you? what about egg beaters?

                                                1. re: mattstolz

                                                  The white. Also I have never had a runny yolk but they don't gross me out like the inside of a boiled or Deviled egg does. The thoughts of an egg white omelet...yuk.

                                                  I have never had egg beaters. Or a reason to try them.

                                                  1. re: Janet from Richmond

                                                    Until very recently (like, in the past two years, and I'm almost 49), I couldn't eat eggs either, unless they were seriously well-beaten, with chalazas removed beforehand, and cooked to death.For some reason I've come to enjoy fried eggs (minus the chalaza, 'cause that's just icky) with slightly underdone yolks. I don't have them often (usually with bibimbap). And I totally agree that the yolk is by far the most edible part.

                                                    1. re: Isolda

                                                      I love eggs, and I love the yolks.

                                                2. re: Janet from Richmond

                                                  I'm with you on the egg aversion/revulsion and carry that on to quiche, friatta, and the like as well. With me, part of it is the smell of cooking/just cooked eggs that's a huge turnoff.

                                                  It takes hiding them in a custard or meringue before I start to find eggs acceptable.

                                                  1. re: Janet from Richmond

                                                    I've never had a fried egg in my life, nor soft-boiled, nor poached.....I'll eat a hard-boiled one occasionally, and can manage the rare bite of scrambled eggs; otherwise, they'd better be well-buried in other things. Ever read Nigel Slater's book, "Toast"? The poor guy has a worse egg phobia than I do.

                                                    1. re: shygirl

                                                      Never had soft boiled. Only had hard boiled in egg or pasta salad but I don't like it.
                                                      Used to only eat scrambled or omelet. I prefer wetter rather than dry or brown eggs. I branched into fried and poached but eggs can skive me out like none other depending on the day.

                                                3. re: Janet from Richmond

                                                  I'm with you, Janet. The only way I like eggs is scrambled or in challa.

                                                4. PB&J. I find peanut butter to be disgusting.

                                                  I like Reese's, roasted peanuts, and peanut soup.

                                                  6 Replies
                                                  1. re: Bob W

                                                    so your aversion to PB is a texture thing?

                                                    1. re: goodhealthgourmet

                                                      Texture, smell, taste...I revile it!

                                                      When I was a kid I hated mustard as much, and was forced to eat cold cuts with inferior condiments like catchup and mayo. Fortunately I came around on that. 8>D

                                                      1. re: Bob W

                                                        you came around on ketchup but not pb?

                                                        sad day indeed.

                                                        1. re: mattstolz

                                                          Came around on how inferior ketchup is! Have tried PB from time to time but cannot even swallow it.

                                                    2. re: Bob W

                                                      Lol, I like peanut butter, though not in dessert, so I hate reeses.

                                                      1. re: Bob W

                                                        Bob, you might consider trying fresh almond butter or cashew butter. Whole different thing. I quit buying peanut butter some time ago but other freshly made nut butters are far superior, and can be substituted anywhere one might use peanut butter. Better flavor, better for you, and they do NOT have the texture of spackling paste.

                                                      2. I have never had salmon or bologna (baloney?)--hell if I know.

                                                        23 Replies
                                                        1. re: Brianne920

                                                          My perpetual response to baloney has always been "Oh, hell, no." I can't explain it entirely. I think it's the uniform color and texture.

                                                          1. re: Terrieltr

                                                            Same! And I don't like the smell. To each their own, though....I suppose :)

                                                          2. re: Brianne920

                                                            Never had salmon? How does one avoid this ubiquitous fish?

                                                            1. re: gaffk

                                                              I am really not sure! I've had all kinds of white fish, tuna, swordfish, etc. and liked them decently, and I really love shellfish, but something about it always freaked me out--I could completely be missing something big! It just never appealed to me enough to order it, and my family never ate it when I was young.

                                                            2. re: Brianne920

                                                              Fried bologna and eggs can be very tasty, kind of like fried spam and eggs.

                                                              1. re: thirtyeyes

                                                                I've never had SPAM, either----and, let's be serious, I'm from PA and I eat scrapple. I'm not scared of the ingredients in it, it's just never appealed to me. I should try it on purpose soon.

                                                                1. re: Brianne920

                                                                  Agreed. I love scrapple (also from PA), but have never thought to try SPAM.

                                                                    1. re: shygirl

                                                                      Seriously shy (kicking Veggo & PK under the table), it's a product common in PA that's made of the scraps of the pig left over after butchering, cornmeal and spices. Typically, it's known as all parts of the pig but the oink. When people from non-scrapple areas of the country hear about it, they are generally repulsed. But those of us who grew up on it think it's delicious. (Hence the analogy to Spam.)

                                                                      1. re: gaffk

                                                                        Except that Spam is not made out of the parts that make up scrapple. Spam is spiced ham and pork shoulder.

                                                                        1. re: gaffk

                                                                          A bit like headcheese? It does ick me out, but I don't know why, since I like liver & sweetbreads. I'm in favour of utilising every part of the critters who give their lives for us; I just haven't got up the nerve yet to try it all. At least "scrapple" sounds okay - the word itself, I mean - whereas "headcheese" just sounds revolting.

                                                                          1. re: shygirl

                                                                            I'm with you on headcheese. I may have eaten it without knowing it (I'm like that with cheese), but the name does unreasonably skeeve me out.

                                                                            1. re: gaffk

                                                                              Headcheese is not cheese, gaffk. It is a terrine made with flesh from the head of a calf or pig (sometimes a sheep or cow), and often set in aspic.

                                                                              I love it myself. But I can see why people would not. Here's a pic.

                                                                               
                                                                              1. re: ttoommyy

                                                                                OK, I've never eaten that.

                                                                                Thanks tt, I learn something new every day. Headcheese is one of those things I've heard of but never sought out.

                                                                                Having said that, I was at a local (SE PA) festival this summer where they demonstrated 19th century scrapple making. The entire pig's head was in the pot--teeth, eyes and all. Still I eat scrapple; so if confronted with headcheese, I'm sure I'd at least taste it (but still not seek it out ;)

                                                                                1. re: ttoommyy

                                                                                  haha this might be my favorite post in this thread.

                                                                                  -"headcheese is gross!"
                                                                                  -"yeah it looks disgusting"
                                                                                  -"heres a pic of it for you!"

                                                                                  1. re: mattstolz

                                                                                    I've always been a fan of visual aids!

                                                                                    1. re: ttoommyy

                                                                                      Must be a man, then. ;-)

                                                                              2. re: shygirl

                                                                                Spam is not at all like headcheese. It is much more ground up and does not contain a lot of gelatinous material within; just on the outside which is easily rinsed away.

                                                                      2. re: Brianne920

                                                                        To me, bologna is just an oversized hot dog, tho i prefer it cold. Just like hot dogs, some bologna is better than others. This one of my secret vices: Bologna on white bread with brown mustard. To make it "extra special" I put ripple chips inside, too. Grilled bologna and cheese is pretty good, too.

                                                                        1. re: al b. darned

                                                                          Ha, I can respect that. As I've admitted before on Chowhound, though, I dislike mustard, and hot dogs, and........gulp.........cheese. Pretty much got my face eaten for that one. I like chips enough, though!

                                                                          1. re: Brianne920

                                                                            We have a friend who does not like cheese either. I didn't realize how much cheese I consume and cook with until I'm having him over and want to serve an appetizer other than hummus ;-)

                                                                            Signed,
                                                                            Janet, Cheesewhore

                                                                            1. re: Janet from Richmond

                                                                              Cheesewhore - hahahaha That's ME! So, of course, it turns out that I'm lactose-intolerant. I get around it by trying, TRYING to stick to the aged hard cheeses, but it's so hard when I have access to a huge variety of the most fantastic cheeses.

                                                                              I was very touched to learn from my mother that her father was a cheese fanatic way back in the 1900's when pretty much the only cheese anyone ever saw was cheddar or Velveeta. It was he who got me to eat blue cheese, shortly before he died. (I was a teenager.) I so wish he were alive today to join me in trying all the amazing cheeses available now.

                                                                              1. re: Janet from Richmond

                                                                                I guess I would be another one who might be reluctant to accept an invitation from you for a meal at your place, then, if everything was cheeses and cheese-heavy stuff. ;-)
                                                                                (I'll eat it, though...)