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ISO Italian bread book

Wanting to buy a mother's day gift: Something about Italian bread. Has all of Reinhart's books but wants something specific to Italy. In Italian possible, mostly with pictures.
Any ideas?

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  1. The Italian Baker, by Carol Field. None better, and a new edition has just been issued.

    17 Replies
    1. re: roxlet

      roxlet, have you seen it? That's such a terriffic book.
      eta I just bought the new edition. NO impulse control.

      1. re: buttertart

        I have the original. What's new in the new one?

        1. re: roxlet

          It said full color photos and some new recipes. I shall compare and report!

      2. re: roxlet

        Agreed. After some research, settled on this one. None better.

        1. re: njmarshall55

          Really? I saw the earlier one and I just wasn't sure. Your rec sounds enthusiastic. Will look for an updated one.

          1. re: itryalot

            Also, if you're doing bread, you may want to consider soup...

            Good & Garlicky, Thick & Hearty, Soul-Satisfying, More-Than-Minestrone Italian Soup Cookbook [Paperback]
            Joe Famularo (Author)

          1. re: roxlet

            I second the motion...I have the old edition. The nice thing about the book besides the recipes is that Ms. Field gives instructions on mixing the dough whether by machine or by hand. I'm a wooden spoon and bowl dough mixer.

            1. re: roxlet

              How are the desserts in this book? I bake bread but am really happy w/ the books I have right now and, while I'd love to branch out, I still have barely scraped what I want to do. But, I always need good Italian desserts, other than the standards.

              1. re: chowser

                Truthfully, chowser, I have never made any of the dessert items in this book, and can only vouch for the breads. That being said, it is a small, but fairly wide-ranging section of the book encompassing tarts, cakes and cookies and includes everything from Cassata to pasta frolla to brutti ma buoni. There is also a section on pizzas.

                1. re: roxlet

                  Thanks--I'm going to see if it's at the library first, before I buy it. I have so many bread baking books already.

                  1. re: roxlet

                    Had you posted about Carol Field's rosemary rolls during the holidays? I'll be making mozzarella carozza this week and thought it would be nice to make some with leftover rolls. Wanted to how many rolls you get and if you adjust for the time; I understand that I may have to go with half the recipe since the full one may be too taxing for my machine.

                    1. re: lilgi

                      I probably did post about the rosemary rolls. I make small rolls, and there is enough for them to cover a half sheet pan -- maybe 50 small rols or so, but I'm not really sure since I've never counted them!

                      1. re: roxlet

                        Thanks! That's plenty with even half but that's okay. I'm sure I'll end up freezing some (I always do).

                        1. re: lilgi

                          oops baking time the same for the smaller buns? I imagine they get done much quicker no?

                          1. re: lilgi

                            Yes, but again, I'm not really sure of the time. I just keep an eye on them as they bake. Maybe you could check another roll recipe to get an estimate of the time. I think that I crank down the oven temp a bit too. Remember, these have milk in them so they tend to brown fairly quickly, though they are small enough to not make that a big issue.

                2. re: roxlet

                  D'accordo (I agree or I second the motion)! I happen to have the old edition.

                  I just realized that I posted before this. A little repetition cannot hurt?

                3. I don't know why you'd want to make Italian bread. According to a couple of people in this thread, http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/827288 "The thing is, Italy really isn't known for its breads, not like France or Germany are." (Sarcasm)

                  3 Replies
                  1. re: pdxgastro

                    ???? I'll let my relatives in Italy know that! LOL
                    That post is laughable. I find that bread in each country has a definite character. Whether or not a place is "known" for its bread is irrelevant (that should make them happy).

                    How about this for a story:
                    http://www.nytimes.com/2006/01/12/int...

                    1. re: itryalot

                      There is a recipe for Altamura bread in The Italian Baker.

                      1. re: itryalot

                        Altamura, if I'm not mistaken is where Buddy Valastro's mom comes from. But more importantly, it's in Puglia which (with Molise, where my family is from) is the BREAD BASKET of Italy. Great wheat is grown there. And great wheat means great bread and great pasta.

                    2. It came today so I've got my work cut out for me this weekend, when not putting myself around Chinese food, cooking, or on here or the other obsession.

                      1 Reply
                      1. re: buttertart

                        I will be very interested to hear your thoughts on the update.

                              1. re: buttertart

                                I was about to ask because it looks really good.

                                1. re: buttertart

                                  Buttertart, this is from The Italian Baker, by Field?

                                  1. re: blue room

                                    (Hand up in the air. "Pick me, pick me! I know the answer!")
                                    Yes, it's from the Italian Baker. I believe it's the first recipe in the book. Right, buttertart?

                                    1. re: roxlet

                                      Si, Signora. It is. Makes fantastic toast too.

                                      1. re: roxlet

                                        Thanks -- I just ordered the book. I'd love to re-create the "Italian Rustique" bread I buy locally.
                                        http://www.vosen.com/
                                        It contains unbleached flour, water, sourdough starter, salt, malt, and yeast. So I'll experiment/fiddle a little.

                                        1. re: blue room

                                          I made this bread -- Carol Field's Pane di Como from "The Italian Baker" this morning! (The starter started yesterday, of course.)
                                          *Very* pleased with it. I used diastatic malt powder rather than malt syrup, after reading that this is a reasonable thing to do.

                                           
                                          1. re: blue room

                                            That looks like a professional loaf!

                                            Which is the one that has the photos in the cookbook? Original or revised edition?

                                            Also wondering about Peter Reinhart's (sp?) ARtisan Breads Every Day? I know it's not Italian only, but thinking I will get her two books.

                                            1. re: itryalot

                                              I like his "Crust and Crumb" better.