HOME > Chowhound > Home Cooking >

Reheating a Chocolate Croissant

d
DaisyM Jan 25, 2012 07:36 AM

One of the best tricks that I've learned from Chowhound is running cold water over a day old baguette and throwing it into a hot oven for a few minutes. I'm wondering, can a day old chocolate croissant be slightly reheated to make it taste freshly made?

  1. Click to Upload a photo (10 MB limit)
Delete
  1. sunshine842 RE: DaisyM Jan 25, 2012 07:45 AM

    only in an oven -- never in a microwave -- and **gently** -- they're delicate and it's all too easy to end up with a collapsed, chewy mess of melted butter and chocolate (and no, it's not very tasty)

    21 Replies
    1. re: sunshine842
      d
      DaisyM RE: sunshine842 Jan 25, 2012 08:24 AM

      Will heating it gently make the dough crispy again? Or is this just a bad idea?

      1. re: DaisyM
        sunshine842 RE: DaisyM Jan 25, 2012 10:50 AM

        it might freshen up the outer layers a bit -- but you're not going to 'hot' here -- you're going for just warm enough to soften the chocolate, which takes just a minute or two at low heat.

      2. re: sunshine842
        mucho gordo RE: sunshine842 Jan 25, 2012 11:35 AM

        10-15 seconds in the m/wave works perfectly for me.

        1. re: mucho gordo
          sunshine842 RE: mucho gordo Jan 25, 2012 12:45 PM

          if they are real croissants made by a baker and not mass-mixed dough regurgitated from a machine onto a conveyor belt, please don't.

          1. re: sunshine842
            mucho gordo RE: sunshine842 Jan 25, 2012 01:29 PM

            They are from Porto's, which is a well known bakery. Does that disqualify them? Are real ones only made at home in single batches?

            1. re: mucho gordo
              sunshine842 RE: mucho gordo Jan 25, 2012 01:40 PM

              hardly -- just that it would be a shame to subject a nice croissant to the mess that a microwave makes of pastries.

              Don't get me wrong -- I use my microwave every day -- but they wreck pastries, even when limited to a few seconds.

              1. re: sunshine842
                mucho gordo RE: sunshine842 Jan 25, 2012 01:51 PM

                For me, just those few seconds are enough to give the pastry a 'fresh from the oven' taste and aroma. I do the same thing with a muffin or chocolate chip danish from another bakery.

                1. re: mucho gordo
                  s
                  sandylc RE: mucho gordo Jan 25, 2012 02:02 PM

                  I think that a baked good that is intended to have a soft exterior texture (like a muffin) is fine nuked lightly. A baked good that carries a basic characteristic of a crisp exterior is best heated in the oven to restore this texture. Clearly, if you have a croissant emergency and are in a hurry, the nuker COULD be used; it just isn't the best thing to do!

                  1. re: sandylc
                    mucho gordo RE: sandylc Jan 25, 2012 02:12 PM

                    I wasn't aware that a croissant had a crisp exterior. Mine seem to be on the flaky side.

                    1. re: mucho gordo
                      s
                      sandylc RE: mucho gordo Jan 25, 2012 02:34 PM

                      Flaky AND lightly crisp. Never soft or mushy.

                      1. re: sandylc
                        mucho gordo RE: sandylc Jan 25, 2012 03:04 PM

                        I never thought of it as 'lightly crisp'; never soft or mushy; just flaky, even after reheat in m/wave. Comes out like oven fresh.

                        1. re: mucho gordo
                          sunshine842 RE: mucho gordo Jan 25, 2012 10:29 PM

                          all this little flaky bits are supposed to be crackly and crumbly -- i.e., lightly crisp.

                          The microwave heats all the little pockets of air that are crucial to a croissant/pain au chocolate, then softens the butter, so the little pockets collapse, leaving all those little flaky bits sopping up the softened butter -- leaving your lovely flaky croissant a spongey, greasy mass.

                          Toaster oven FTW.

                          1. re: sunshine842
                            mucho gordo RE: sunshine842 Jan 26, 2012 09:49 AM

                            I was under the impression that a 'light crisp' was attained only after the croissant has come out of the oven, cools down and sets.

                            1. re: mucho gordo
                              sunshine842 RE: mucho gordo Jan 26, 2012 01:42 PM

                              nope -- they're wonderfully flaky and crispy when they're still warm, right out of the oven.

                          2. re: mucho gordo
                            s
                            sandylc RE: mucho gordo Jan 26, 2012 09:30 AM

                            Your croissants might not be of great quality?

                            1. re: sandylc
                              mucho gordo RE: sandylc Jan 26, 2012 09:50 AM

                              I have to assume you're not familiar with bakery I mentioned upthread (Porto's). Quality is not an issue here.

                              1. re: mucho gordo
                                s
                                sandylc RE: mucho gordo Jan 26, 2012 03:11 PM

                                No, I'm not...we must be on different parts of the planet! I'll look it up on Mr. Google.

            2. re: mucho gordo
              j
              jcattles RE: mucho gordo Jan 26, 2012 08:50 AM

              I don't care what the others say, I'm with you! I've always put them in the microwave for a few seconds. Just enough to warm them up, not get them a gooey hot mess.

              Geez people, just because it's different from what you do, doesn't make it wrong.

              1. re: jcattles
                s
                sandylc RE: jcattles Jan 26, 2012 09:31 AM

                We're just concerned about preserving the wonderful texture and structure that are unique to excellent croissants. Do what you will...but the OP did ask!

                1. re: jcattles
                  mucho gordo RE: jcattles Jan 26, 2012 09:51 AM

                  Exactly! Thank you

                  1. re: jcattles
                    sunshine842 RE: jcattles Jan 26, 2012 02:03 PM

                    It was, for me, much more of "but there's a much better way to do that!" -- I don't see anywhere that I said it was wrong -- the strongest wording I gave it was 'please don't do that to your croissant"

                    And I wasn't even nasty or hysterical about it -- and I even said *why* I felt that way, not just a shrill voice through the intarwebs laying down the law for no apparent reason.

                    If I'm not mistaken, the original question was requesting the best way to reheat a pain au chocolat --

                    If you want to nuke yours, I couldn't care less-- but I still don't think it's the best way to do it.

              2. ipsedixit RE: DaisyM Jan 25, 2012 10:28 AM

                I would just learn to like cold croissants. Really. They're not *that* bad.

                1. o
                  owen_meany RE: DaisyM Jan 25, 2012 12:20 PM

                  I've always had good luck just popping day old croissants in my toaster oven for a few minutes. Watched carefully of course!

                  1. s
                    sandylc RE: DaisyM Jan 25, 2012 01:50 PM

                    A few minutes in the oven (or toaster oven). NO MICROWAVE.

                    5 Replies
                    1. re: sandylc
                      d
                      DaisyM RE: sandylc Jan 25, 2012 02:48 PM

                      The reason it will be day old is because I want it for Valentine's Day breakfast for DH. I won't have time to get a fresh one, so wanted to make sure that it will still be okay on day 2. I will use the toaster oven. Thank you!

                      1. re: DaisyM
                        b
                        benbenberi RE: DaisyM Jan 25, 2012 04:02 PM

                        In that case, it might be a good idea to wrap it up & stick it in the freezer as soon as you get it home -- that will keep it almost fresh. Reheat in the oven (toaster oven) from frozen.

                        1. re: benbenberi
                          j
                          jcattles RE: benbenberi Jan 26, 2012 08:55 AM

                          That makes no sense to me. If she buys it one day, planning to eat it the next, it just seems like overkill to freeze it. Just heat it up gently, however you choose to do it (microwave, toaster oven, oven).

                          If she was going to keep it for a week then freezing it would make sense.

                        2. re: DaisyM
                          s
                          sciencediet RE: DaisyM Jan 26, 2012 07:51 AM

                          If you have a Trader Joe's nearby, try their frozen ones. Proof overnight and bake in the am--at least as good as day-old bakery croissants.

                        3. re: sandylc
                          greygarious RE: sandylc Jan 26, 2012 02:09 PM

                          Though I use my microwave a great deal, I agree that it is a complete no-no for reheating croissants. I use the toaster oven unless I have another reason to heat up the full-sized oven. When using the former, it helps to cover the croissant with a piece of aluminum foil, shiny side DOWN. Just lay it over the croissant, so the top doesn't scorch.

                        4. n
                          nasigoreng RE: DaisyM Jun 30, 2013 04:14 PM

                          It is important to wrap them loosely in foil before heating. If you do not, the will be less moist and buttery. Heat very slowly on a low heat setting if previously frozen. It is amazing how good a previously frozen croissant from a place like Costco can taste and feel using this approach

                          5 Replies
                          1. re: nasigoreng
                            sunshine842 RE: nasigoreng Jun 30, 2013 07:35 PM

                            you might be interested to know that patissiers in France will almost always reheat a pain au chocolat for you if you ask them nicely.

                            They do this by slipping it right into the oven -- no foil, which will trap the moisture and steam it into a gloppy mess.

                            1. re: sunshine842
                              n
                              nasigoreng RE: sunshine842 Jul 1, 2013 11:29 AM

                              Maybe they need to try foil.
                              Pain au chocolat is not really the same as a croissant.

                              I just know that when I have had old croissants from the patisserie or Monoprix ot croissants from Costco packaged by the dozen, the always are more delectable when heated slightly in loosely wrapped foil.

                              1. re: nasigoreng
                                sunshine842 RE: nasigoreng Jul 1, 2013 05:43 PM

                                the thread is about chocolate croissants....which the French tend to call "pain au chocolat"

                                And yes, it's the same dough....it just has chocolate rolled inside.

                                1. re: sunshine842
                                  n
                                  nasigoreng RE: sunshine842 Jul 2, 2013 11:17 AM

                                  I would of never guessed.

                                2. re: nasigoreng
                                  w
                                  WraithX RE: nasigoreng Jan 20, 2014 10:08 AM

                                  Are you seriously suggesting that French patissiers should learn from Americans reheating costco mass-produced chocolate breads?

                                  furthermore, "chocolate croissant" is an Americanism for "pain au chocolat". They are the same thing (except the French know how to make them and reheat them properly).

                            2. z
                              Zayphod RE: DaisyM May 4, 2014 12:09 AM

                              I'm trying to use a Halogen Oven now as microwaves are so 80s

                              how do you best re-heat a chocolate coissant ?

                              Show Hidden Posts