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Panko Bread Crumbs a Must?

Do I really need these in my pantry? Sounds like one more thing to get lost behind the tea bags. Maybe someone could enlighten me on their use.

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  1. Panko certainly isn't a Must in your pantry but they are different than your regular home made or store boxed types. Because Panko have a broader surface they create a crisper, lighter crust on the foods they're used on, plus they are virtually tasteless so take a variety of seasonings well and do not absorb oil as readily.. I've used them in meatloaf, meatballs, as toppings for casseroles, etc.

    BTW: Panko simply means breadcrumbs in Japanese...

    1 Reply
    1. re: Gio

      There was a distinction at one time because in addition to a flakier crumb the bread itself was lighter and there were no crust bits in panko. But there's no regulated meaning so most manufacturers are calling their breadcrumbs panko.

    2. I love panko, especially on pork or chicken cutlets. As Gio said, it does provide for a crispier product. I think it's a must try, and if you don't like it, no harm no foul...

      1. No.

        A good EVOO is a pantry staple; whereas a good truffle oil is a luxury.

        Same with Panko. If breadcrumbs are a staple, then Panko is a luxury.

        2 Replies
        1. re: ipsedixit

          I think Panko is the staple. Packaged regular bread crumbs are icky like stale sawdust, IMO, so I'd always make regular breadcrumbs myself anyway, meaning they don't need to be purchased because I always have bread. Panko is not a home-reproducable product--I think it's freeze dried or something, and not actually made starting with bread. It keeps for ages and makes much better breaded and fried anything.

          1. re: ipsedixit

            Panko is SO not truffle oil equivalent. Panko is multipurpose and multiversatile just like a good EVOO, whereas truffle oil is fairly limited with respect to its use.
            I use Panko for any recipe calling for breadcrumbs, including meatloaf, meatball, oven fried chicken recipes and anything that may require thickening with bread (I don't usually have fresh bread on hand) including ricotta fillings and soups. (OH and don't hate, my meatloaf and meatballs come out just fine LOLOL). It is completely versatile, more so than the hydrogenated overseasoned bread crumbs at the grocery store Of course, to avoid using the usual breadcrumbs under the Panko name, simply buy the Panko Japanese box. They aren't significantly more expensive than regular breadcrumbs but I find them well worth the cost.

          2. Yes. They not only fry better they bind better in any stuffing or meatloaf. We threw out the breadcrumbs. I know some brands are pricey but Ian's is not that expensive and worth every penny IMHO.

            1. Panko crumbs are superior, in my experience, so if you keep breadcrumbs on hand, why not keep the best ones? If you never use breadcrumbs of any sort, then obviously you don't need them.

              I usually use them to lightly coat pork or chicken cutlets before sauteing. They are good in meatloaf, etc. too, but it's harder to discern the difference from regular breadcrumbs in that sort of application.

              I've been following the Primal/Paleo diet and Panko crumbs are one of the few grain items I've decided not to give up (figuring a tablespoon of crumbs every once in a while won't hurt me), so they are definitely a must have item for me.

              1 Reply
              1. re: electricfish

                Agreed on all accounts. We also eat Paleo, but every few weeks I use Panko for chicken cutlets. As I just bought really nice cutlets from H-Mart tonight, you can guess what'll be for dinner tomorrow ... :-)

                They are also sublime (is it ok to use that word?) with poached or soft/medium eggs. http://circle-b-kitchen.squarespace.c...

                It wasn't quite as easy for me as the person who put this together but they tasted AMAZING.