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Jamie's US tour show. Anybody seen it/ Thoughts/

w
Westy Jan 11, 2012 05:20 AM

I have a few taped, but haven't watched it. Curious to hear others' thoughts.

Matt

  1. w
    Westy Jan 17, 2012 06:17 AM

    Well...i watched the Wyoming episode. All i could think of was that it might be interesting to someone from another country. I was intrigued by his bean recipe, but it seemed almost an afterthought.

    I actually did get a kick out of it.

    Maybe it makes more sense if you had his book?

    1 Reply
    1. re: Westy
      h
      Harters Jan 17, 2012 07:09 AM

      "Maybe it makes more sense if you had his book?"

      'Fraid not - see my 11/1 post

    2. s
      SeoulQueen Jan 15, 2012 09:27 PM

      It's better than Jamie's last series - that one where he's in the back roads of Arkansas or Tennessee etc trying to persuade schools to cook more healthy food. That was just boring.

      So far, I've only seen the LA and Wyoming episodes and I enjoyed them both, probably because I didn't consider it a cooking show but more a travelogue/slice of America type of show. However, I was cringing during the LA episode whenever he said "brother" to an ex-gang member or "darling" to a young woman. Trying too hard mate!

      1. paulj Jan 12, 2012 02:33 PM

        http://www.jamieoliver.com/tv-books/j...
        is the web site for this series. It first aired in the UK in 2009.

        1. L.Nightshade Jan 12, 2012 02:03 PM

          I've only watched the first couple episodes, as they've just started to air on BBC America. I rather enjoyed the first one, in L.A. Kind of like "The Wire" visits the Food Network. I had some hope for the show at that point: different, interesting.The second episode, in which Jamie turns cowboy, left me pretty cold. And it is definitely not about the recipes, and almost only tangentially about cooking.

          1. ipsedixit Jan 11, 2012 07:35 AM

            It's stupid.

            Not worth the electricity.

            1. h
              Harters Jan 11, 2012 05:40 AM

              Assuming this is the programme that accompanied his book "Jamie's America" then, yes, I watched them all and have the book.

              Packed with American cliche. The reformed gang member. Trailer park racism. "Hip" New York.

              Not as much actual cooking as his usual series and, in truth, there's nothing in the book that we've been inspired to cook so far. But then, over the years, we've found that inspiration from JO declines series by series.

              6 Replies
              1. re: Harters
                w
                Westy Jan 11, 2012 05:55 AM

                That is really too bad. I have and like some of his cookbooks very much. "Cook with Jamie" and his Italian cookbooks are among my favorites. He and Nigel Slater were the two writers that taught me the most. Too bad NS never got a series (at least one available in theUS).
                Matt

                1. re: Westy
                  h
                  Harters Jan 11, 2012 07:04 AM

                  Slater's had three series, I think.

                  One some years back in conjunction with his "Real Food" book. And two in the last year or so. Maybe BBC America will get round to showing them for you.

                  1. re: Westy
                    Robin Joy Jan 11, 2012 07:36 AM

                    Some short NS clips on the web:

                    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7YY0-4...

                  2. re: Harters
                    Betty Jan 12, 2012 02:13 PM

                    I'm disappointed in it. It has no new insights into any region, so I can only assume I am not the intended audience. Maybe someone who has never been to America would find it interesting.

                    1. re: Betty
                      h
                      Harters Jan 12, 2012 02:35 PM

                      Correct, Betty. You're not the intended audience - the programme is British made for a British audience (but now, of course, sold overseas for foreign comsumption)

                      1. re: Harters
                        LulusMom Jan 17, 2012 09:25 AM

                        And very much full of cliches. Not for us americans, and there isn't much to learn, so far. I like JO a lot, and love his books, but this is one I'll be by-passing. I just finished watching Stephen Fry's America, which, while also having cliches, was a lot more interesting (and had only marginally less cooking - by which I mean none).

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