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Two of the same knife?

Do any of you have two of the same knife type in your kitchen? E.g., a white steel gyuto and a stainless gyuto of the same size.

I'm wondering if anyone can see a justification for having two of the same type of knife. Or do you think / find that one of them wouldn't be / isn't used?

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  1. I have 2 santokus-1 is VG-10 1 is *2 blue I use them both about the same

    I have 2 "boning" knives 1 is VG-10 semi flexy 1 is a honesuki #2 blue use them both the same amount

    I have 2 gyutos 1 is #2 blue 240mm 1 is "HD super mystery" steel 240mm. I hardly use the blue #2 anymore.:(

    I'm not justifying having 2 of the same type of knife but that's how I roll... :-D
    But seriously..Different knife for a different task + I think it's fun to try different steels,profiles and makers.
    So many great knives..so little time and money......

    11 Replies
    1. re: petek

      ---
      I have 2 gyutos 1 is #2 blue 240mm 1 is "HD super mystery" steel 240mm. I hardly use the blue #2 anymore.:(
      ---
      Hmm, this is what I imagine happening for me, given gyutos are sort of general-purpose. Although you say you use both santokus, which I'd think are used for similar tasks, so maybe that's then like having 4 of the same knife and using 3 of them.

      1. re: eethan

        "that's then like having 4 of the same knife and using 3 of them."
        Kinda I guess..
        The 2 VG-10 SS knives(Kasumi) were the first Japanese steel that I purchased.They are hefty,robust knives that I don't mind abusing a bit at work and are easy to care for( totally non reactive)

        The # aogami #2 blue(Moritaka) are lighter,nimbler but much more reactive and harder to care for,especially at work.
        The HD mystery steel knife(Konosuke) is lighter and nimbler than the Moritakas very non reactive easy to sharpen and holds a great edge so it's perfect for work.

        Who knows what I'll buy next?? A western Deba a hankotsu a sujihiki or even another gyuto(Masamoto KS series)???

      2. re: petek

        "I have 2 gyutos 1 is #2 blue 240mm 1 is "HD super mystery" steel 240mm. I hardly use the blue #2 anymore.:("

        I know you use the HD steel at work. You don't use the blue steel gyuto (Moritaka) at home? What do you use at home?

        1. re: Chemicalkinetics

          "I know you use the HD steel at work. You don't use the blue steel gyuto (Moritaka) at home? What do you use at home?"

          I use the HD at home as well. I've officially retired the Moritaka,I think I over sharpened her in my pursuit of the "perfect/sharpest " edge...:(

          1. re: petek

            What is 'over sharpened'?? I did not know that was a hazard!

            1. re: eethan

              Moritakas are notorious for their over grind issues(I was in denial about this problem) so over time and too many sharpenings it's developed an uneven edge with a protruding heel.I might take her to one of my local knife purveyors/sharpeners to see what the can do for me.Not sure if it's worth the time or money...

              1. re: petek

                "Moritakas are notorious for their over grind issues(I was in denial about this problem) so over time and too many sharpenings it's developed an uneven edge with a protruding heel."

                Ah. So you were hiding the truth from us. :)

                This is the beauty of a fully machined knife. It always turns out identical as the others, with no overgrinding issues.

                I don't know how bad this overgrinding is, but you may able to fix it yourself.

                1. re: Chemicalkinetics

                  "Ah. So you were hiding the truth from us. :)"
                  I wasn't hiding anything! I was in denial I tell ya..
                  Truth is I really don't know if it was me or an over grind issue that cased the heel to protrude.

                  1. re: petek

                    "Truth is I really don't know if it was me or an over grind issue that cased the heel to protrude."

                    True. Heel is a very common place to overgrind on our own. So you didn't have any funky protrude edge in the middle of the edge profile, right?

                    http://www.kitchenknifeforums.com/att...

                      1. re: petek

                        In that case, it may not be be Mortitaka's fault. You can probably tell if the knife has been overgrind, by examining the thickness above the edge.

      3. I assume you don't mean paring knives because many people have several similar paring knives.

        I do have two of the same knives. Two nakiri of very similar size, and two Chinese cleavers of the same model. I place the other ones in long term storage. I have a small size wood block (intentionally so), so I only placed the more unique knives out.

        That being said, there are definitely advantages of two similar knives. Some people really like the profile of a gyuto, so they will have at thick blade one and a thin blade one. Two knives also increases the time you need to sharpen them. For people who like to send out knives for sharpening, a second knife acts as a backup.

        3 Replies
        1. re: Chemicalkinetics

          Now that you mention it, why is it standard to have several paring knives? Actually I don't have any, but over the holiday I was cooking in my parents' kitchen. There, I settled on one paring knife that I liked and didn't use any of their several others. Maybe there are some food prep. tasks that I'm not thinking of?

          Good point about sharpening interval, though.

          1. re: eethan

            " why is it standard to have several paring knives? "

            I probably should have stated "standard". I should have written "common".

            Yeah, having a few knives really increases my duration for knife sharpening. I don't have to sharpening my knives nearly as often.

            1. re: eethan

              Hi, eethan:

              Well, let me try: Back in the day, when people made large quantities of "peelable" things to serve or preserve, it was commonsense to press several people into service doing the peeling. Likewise when two or more such dishes were prepared at the same time.

              And there *are* different tasks that slightly different lengths and profiles do better at.

              Aloha,
              Kaleo

          2. i have 3 of the same size santoku, one crap german, one decent german and one powdered steel, i have 3 chef knives though decent size, i am sure over the next 10 years i will have an additional number of same knives of different materials, i do use them often because i take some to work and use some at home and depending on task or sharpness or thickness will use for different things, if i had a lot of money i would have so many more knives :P or if my girlfriend let me have more :P

            1. Hi, eethan:

              I have 3 10" Euro-style chefs with almost exactly the same profile, but in different steels and thicknesses--a thick German SS for heavy everyday use, a very thin custom carbon steel one for vegetables, and an ancient rattail Sabatier that is boobytrapped with 440V (electricity, not steel) in case anyone else in the world makes a grab for it.

              Frankly, I see more sense in having two or more of the same size and profile if they *work* for you than I do having an assortment of sizes, only one of which works for you. My 8" and 6" (reground after Wahine broke off the tip in frozen food) Euro chefs' are practically useless to me. As soon as I can stitch up a sheath for the latter, it will be reborn a belt knife.

              Aloha,
              Kaleo

              3 Replies
              1. re: kaleokahu

                Kaleo, given that you have three of them, you obviously like ten inch Chef's knives. I absolutely love my little rattail Sabatier paring knife and find it far lighter and more nimble than even a comparably sized Thiers Issard traditional riveted paring knife. Do you find the 10" Sabatier noticeably light and nimble as well? I am trying to calibrate whether a 12" rattail Chef's knife would be a wonderful thing to have or whether it is just a silly whim. My "go to" knife is a forty year old riveted Sabatier, 10". The extra length as compared to my wife's 8" makes a lot of jobs much easier. It seems a 12" might be even better.

                BTW, OP, I have had three 8" Chef's knives over the years: a Henckels South American carbon steel knife I loved (it met a sad demise), a Henckels SS that was ho-hum (that is charitable), and a TI that is my wife's "big" knife. The three were so different that until this post it never occurred to me to think of them as basically the same knife, but I guess they are.

                1. re: tim irvine

                  Hi, Tim:

                  Yes, my Sabatier is nimbler than the German, which I attribute both to the rattail and a different distal taper in the blade. The custom vegetable knife is nimbler still, because it was made from straight-gauge steel, and so has only edge and secondary bevels.

                  I think a 12-inch blade might indeed be even better, but I haven't played with one, and it would not fit into my in-drawer open "block". There is a *really* large--like 14"--Euro chef that my go-to indie store keeps on aisle display just to sing its Siren song to brave Odysseus (or is it Maui?)...

                  Aloha,

                  Kaleo

                  1. re: kaleokahu

                    Not sure if it is Odysseus or Scylla and Charybdis. Either way, even though there is no room in my block, the lure is great. In this life, however, I dare not open the door to single bevel blades. My old Sabatiers will slice a very ripe tomato thin enough to see their patina through the slice. Please don't tell me there is a whole world beyond!

              2. Just paring knives, which has been mentioned. I have one Wustof one that I use for bigger jobs as it feels better in my hand, and I am careful to keep it sharp. Otherwise, I have about 5 victorinox and a couple "other brand" paring knives that I use for small jobs and toss in the dishwasher/let my husband use. That's the only benefit that I see to having multiples of the same knife unless you often cook with someone who likes to use similar knives to your knife of choice.