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Stuffed Crab Filipino style

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I had excellent stuffed crab in the shell at Maharlika, it was prepared very well . Tasted great. The Escabeche was excellent also.

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Maharlika
111 First Ave, New York, NY 10003

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  1. What else is good at Maharlika?

    1. Rellenong alimasag is a real treat, particularly when the stuffing is enriched with crab fat, but I've never seen it on a menu in NYC. Is this on Maharlika's regular menu or was it a special?

      3 Replies
      1. re: JungMann

        The crab was a special and not on the regular menu yet. They plan on expanding the regular menu. The sizzling sisig is good a Maharlika ( i usually add some chillis to it and lemon), the fried bangus ( milkfish) is good, The lechon kawali is usually good,the kare kare is excellent but ask for some alemong (shrimp paste) to add to it.If they have Escabeche try it. The adobo is good, and the lumpiang shangai are long ones, but fresh made and good. The crispy pata is good too. Didi i leave out anything? haha ,The Pacquiao Punch is a nice cocktail. they make. Most of all the atmosphere is really good, and the staff is quite friendly

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        Maharlika
        111 First Ave, New York, NY 10003

        1. re: foodwhisperer

          Did you pay them a visit when they were a pop-up brunch at Leon? My food during that period was so uniformly disappointing, I could not understand where their good reviews were coming from. I'd like to know they have demonstrably improved and are living up to the hype now. Perhaps a Filipino chowdown is in order.

          What filling did they use for the crab? The pork and crab or the crab and mustard?

          1. re: JungMann

            JungMann: I didn't check them out when they were a popup. And my original review on CH of Maharlika, was not the best. I kind of thought it was weird that they had spam, on the menu, for one thing. We have it in our cupboard at home, but we don't want to go to a restaurant to eat that. ( my girlfriend is Filipino). But after eating their several times quite often with Filipinos who are very critical of their food, espeicially when it doesn't have the "right taste", I have been happy with most of the dishes, even if I have to fix them up a little to my taste i.e adding chillis, adding vinegar, adding bagoong etc. I suggest giving them a shot.I think the food keeps getting better, as long as the regular chef is there. They have accomplished something significant or wonderful in that they are putting Filipino food on the map. Most Filipino restaurants have little atmosphere, not a real "party " environment, not attractive to people in 20's and 30's. not appealing to non-Filipinos, they have managed to create a conducive environment to those unlikely to frequent Filipino restaurants. Yet, they maintain the traditional flavor. Unlike Payag in Queens, which has a nice look, the food has too much of a twist to it there. And unlike most other Filipino restuarants with formica tables and bright lights, Maxwell House coffee, and food unattractively placed on plates, this place adds a bit more "classiness".Not that I don't frequent those other places, i'm just saying they did a good thing and I think you should try the food again. Christmas I was there with Filipinos from California and Phillipines and New York. we ate alot, and the people I was with gave it the thumbs up. No, they didn't say it was amazing, but they said it was good. The sisig is better at Tito Rad's, and the BBQ is better at Ihawan, but theirs is not far behind.

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            Maharlika
            111 First Ave, New York, NY 10003

      2. We had dinner sometime mid-December last month. The service was good and a notch above the regular Filipino restaurants that we’ve been to, even as they did take the Filipino eating-style very seriously, because when I asked for a knife to cut on the ox-tail in our kare-kare dish, our wait staff politely reasoned out that Filipinos don’t use the utensil. She obliged anyway, but with a smiling declaration that “Here’s one knife for the both of you”.

        We had the kare-kare (good) and the sisig (average). I can’t recall our appetizer or dessert, but would go back to try other dishes.

        I agree that it’s good of them to help put Filipino food on the map, but somehow I felt that I spent more than I should for the dishes that we had in the restaurant.

        1 Reply
        1. re: RCC

          RCC, yes, in my original review I commented on the price, and the sisig was much smaller than other places. But I've come to love this place. The no knife thing is ,"very Filipino" but i always ask for a knife to cut the lechon kawali, and other things. One night there a Korean waiter was telling my Filipina girlfriend how to eat Filipino food. Go figure. But again, i much prefer this place to the other Manhattan Filipino restaurants. Cozy , warm environment