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Wusthof Ikon

I am looking at purchasing a Wusthof Ikon chef's knife, either the 20 cm or 23 cm blade. Is there anyone out there who owns one of these knives and can tell me their experience of using them? Do you think they're worth the $100 they cost? If there's anyone who's owned and used one for a good amount of time I'd love to hear your thoughts on it. I'm also looking at a paring knife in the same line. Thanks!

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  1. I don't own one but handle them all day long as far as selling them and Iike them better than the traditional classic. A little bit nicer heft and the dont have a bolster that comes all the way down the blade which will come in handy years from now when the blade wears up the blade. Would be my first pick if I chose a Wusthof.

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    1. I own a Wusthif Blackwood Ikon paring knife, not a Chef knife. I thought a Ikon knife would cost much more than $100. Anyway, if you can get one for $100 and you like German style knife, then sure. Like Rudy said, it has a nicer finish, more ergonomic handle (maybe), a bit more handle heavy, and finally it has a reduced bolster which is nice.

      15 Replies
      1. re: Chemicalkinetics

        I live in Europe so they're a little cheaper here. 95 - 105 euro depending on the length, from a good online retailer.

        1. re: Chemicalkinetics

          I was gonna say something about that price.. sounded cheap... Usually 8 " ikon classic is $120,Ikon blackwood $150

          1. re: RudysEquipment_Supplies

            Yeah, this is one of the only times when living in Italy makes something I want cheaper.

            1. re: RudysEquipment_Supplies

              I guess we should have suspected when rvgregerson wrote 20 cm and 23 cm. :)

              1. re: RudysEquipment_Supplies

                Any reason to go for the blackwood over the classic? Or is it just looks? I like the looks of the cream ones myself.

                1. re: rvgregerson

                  It is wood vs plastic handle. Look, feel, weight...etc. Very minor issues.

                  1. re: Chemicalkinetics

                    Okay. There's about a 40 euro difference ... not worth it for me, then.

                    1. re: rvgregerson

                      Since you said you like the cream look, then most definitely not worth it. I bought the Blackwood simply because I like the blackwood look and feel. The knife steel is the same for both series. The handle shape is also the same.

                    2. re: Chemicalkinetics

                      Unfortunately I've never seen them in person because I haven't been able to locate a brick and mortar store where I live that carries them, but from the pictures I've been able to find them cream color looks sleek. But "de gustibus"...

                2. re: Chemicalkinetics

                  I bought the Ikon birds beak when I was in culinary school and was doing lots of tournes. Its a great knife.

                  1. re: twyst

                    :) Nice. I have never ever made a tourne cut. You are good.

                    1. re: Chemicalkinetics

                      Im still not great at it, but you have to do so many in culinary school that you at least have to be proficient in them. I dont think Ive ever done tournes other than when I was in class. (I dont work in the food industry, I went to culinary school at night for fun ><)

                      1. re: Chemicalkinetics

                        Funny, I saw these for the first time a couple weeks ago in France and was wondering what the deal was. I will have to give it a try if I go for the bird's beak knife. Any other reason to prefer that one over the straight-edged paring knife?

                        1. re: rvgregerson

                          Some people like them for peeling stuff, but I prefer a a regular paring knife for that. Its a highly specialized knife and I cant see a reason to own one other than to do tournes, so for anyone not working in a classic french restaurant or going to culinary school it would be money wasted IMHO

                          1. re: twyst

                            Okay, thanks. I definitely don't plan on doing either.

                  2. This decision may just have been decided. There is a four piece set on half off sale for euro 222.22 that includes a 20 cm chef's knife, a 20 cm slicer, a 20 cm bread knife, and a 9 cm slicer, all Ikon Blackwood. (Comparison: the chef's knife alone goes for euro 139 and everything separate would be euro 433.98). That could be too good of a deal for me to pass up. Downside: doesn't include a paring knife.

                    6 Replies
                    1. re: rvgregerson

                      That is a nice deal. Have fun with them. I feel a 9 cm (3.5 inch) slicer is really like a paring knife -- I mean most paring I know is about 3-4 inch long.

                      1. re: rvgregerson

                        Funny: that 9 cm knife is referred to as a slicer on Italian language sites and as a paring knife on English language sites. It's clearly not actually a paring knife, though, because the pictures show the slightly curved blade of a slicer.

                        1. re: rvgregerson

                          I don't think Wusthof makes 9 cm slicer. Here is a list of Wusthof Ikon knives:

                          http://www.wusthof.com/desktopdefault...

                          Do you see any one resembles this 9 cm knife?

                          1. re: Chemicalkinetics

                            Sorry, I was looking at the 9 cm paring knife and made a translation error. But oddly the Italian sites group the 9 and 12 cm paring knives in one place and then the 7 and 8 cm knives in another place as "vegetable knives," whereas the English site keeps them together. The Italian description puts an emphasis on the use of the 9 cm for slicing onions and such. But this could just be how an Italian would use the knife vs. how we would use it. It is shaped the same way as the 16 cm slicer, though, and not like the 8 cm paring knife.

                            1. re: rvgregerson

                              I think that I was confused by the 9 cm paring knife not having a straight edge. I've never used a paring knife without a straight edge. But admittedly I don't know that much about good knives -- I grew up on Chicago Cutlery at home.

                              1. re: rvgregerson

                                rvgregerson,

                                I think you are talking about the so-called sheep's foot paring knife like this:

                                https://secure.finishlinestudios.com/...

                                In truth, the most popular form of paring knife is the one which look like a tiny slicer:

                                http://blog.thenibble.com/2011/10/13/...

                                So I think you pretty much has everything: a Chef's knife, a paring knife, a bread knife and a slicer.

                      2. I have one of the culinar line santoku and really like it. I chose it because it just felt right in my hand. I've had it for about 6 years I think.