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Pasta: Fresh vs Dry

I'm taking a cooking class in Italy and just received a 28 page list of recipes to choose 3 from to learn. It is overwhelming.

I know I want to make at least one pasta dish. There are lists of different recipes for dry pasta and also fresh pasta.

My question....is there a "rule" about using certain types of sauces for dry vs. fresh pasta? Is the type of pasta a regional preference?

And finally, do you make fresh pasta? Is it something that is difficult to learn to do really well or should I be happy to nail a couple of great sauces for dry pasta?

Thanks for your pasta guidance.

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  1. I'll happily stand corrected if I'm off-base, but I believe that the only rules about sauces are to match particular shapes.

    Fresh pasta is so amazingly good -- it's lighter, more tender (not squishy like it's overcooked, but has a better texture IMO) and marries with sauces in ways that dry pasta will never be able to do.

    Fresh pasta is time-consuming (the rolling and drying parts, as it has to be dried to some degree, or you'd just have wet dumplings) -- but easy and so worth it.

    1 Reply
    1. re: sunshine842

      I've really liked the texture of fresh pasta, better then dried. I'm glad to get your input.

    2. My personal rule for fresh pasta sauces is to sauce it very minimally. Otherwise you overwhelmed the flavor/texture of the pasta you went to that trouble for. A bit of butter/salt/parmesan or some chopped fresh tomatos and basil or some pesto, etc. others may disagree.

      1 Reply
      1. re: danna

        Fresh pasta also makes heavenly ravioli/tortellini/other filled shapes. I recently had some fresh ravioli with cepes (porcini) and black truffles -- I did nothing more but melt a little butter over this, so the filling would stand alone. It was as heavenly as it sounds.

      2. In my experience, dried and fresh pasta are not interchangeable unless you have no other option. Most fresh is egg pasta, which has a different flavor and texture from commercial dried that is made from wheat (hopefully semolina is in there) and then extruded. It holds up heavier sauces and has a more rustic texture. Fresh pasta is not difficult to make, especially if you have a food processor and a hand-crank pasta roller. Otherwise, it can take some time to learn the techniques but certainly doable. If I was in Italy, I would want to learn how to make various filled pastas and some of the unusual pasta shapes.

        1. This time of year, I make fresh pasta every weekend. I don't make pasta in the summer. Too hot and humid. I've been making fresh pasta regularly for the past 2 years. I think it's easy. I make the dough in the food processor, let it rest, than roll it with my kitchen aid electronic rollers. It doesn't take that much active time. It is so delicious too.

          1 Reply
          1. re: msv

            Thanks for everyone's response. I'm going to request to learn two fresh pasta dishes. It would be great to be to make this at home.

          2. That sounds like tons of fun, DaisyM!

            Could you perhaps pose the same question to your cooking instructors in Italy and see what their take on it is? And please report back! Enjoy Italy!

            1 Reply
            1. re: seamunky

              Yes, I'm going to ask her and will report back along with the dishes we choose. I'll post the recipes when we get back and hopefully others will try them and enjoy.

            2. I agree w/ the above posters who say to go w/ fresh for simpler sauces, dried for hearty ones. Although, I have to say a thicker hand cut fresh pasta w/ a hearty ragu can't be beat. Mostly if you want the heavy sauce to adhere to the pasta, dried is the way to go. Fresh pasta as carbonara can't be beat.

              As making pasta goes, I don't think it's that easy. It starts out like making bread (although I like doing the well w/ flour and eggs) but while bread is forgiving pasta can be too dry, too wet and hard to roll out and end up inedible. If you had someone over your shoulder as you did it, it would be great. It's taken me a lot of trial and error to get it right. And, there's nothing more discouraging than mixing it, kneading, rolling and then having it all clump together after cutting. And, that doesn't get into how to roll it through the machine with two hands--one feeds the pasta dough into the machine, one rolls the machine and you need a third to guide it out. It's definitely worth doing but it does take practice.

              4 Replies
              1. re: chowser

                Thanks for telling me that. I have a general fear of dough! But my husband does make bread and he's up for learning pasta.

                1. re: DaisyM

                  It's really fun and my kids love to help with it so I hope I wasn't discouraging. It just seemed so easy when they do it on TV and I wasn't expecting the noodles to clump together, or fall apart, or come out too thick (did it by hand that time) like spaetzle, or have so much trouble rolling out for ravioli, or break the handle on the Atlas, etc. I'm so glad I stuck with it but it just looks way too easy, people who've grown up doing it say it is, and I make bread all the time, so I wasn't expecting that much trial and error. Let us know how it goes and share tips you get in class! Thanks!

                2. re: chowser

                  I disagree.

                  Dry pasta for the lighter sauces and fresh for the more hearty. Obviously there aren't any 'real' rules, but there is reasoning.

                  The reason fresh pasta should be used with heartier sauces is that fresh comes out 'la lingue di gatto' (like a cat's tongue). It's got a rougher texture to help hold the heavier sauces and make them stick.

                  Dried pastas can be quickly tossed and lightly coated in oil and it's ready to serve, not really needing a heavy condimento.

                  But then there's regionality.

                  In the south, most pastas are usually only made with semolina and hot water and then dried (sometimes used fresh), due to the scortching hot weather. Eggy pastas don't keep very well in the heat.

                  1. re: Novelli

                    I always think of dried pasta as having more toothiness but I do buy bronze cut. The dried is a heartier noodle so I tend to pair it w/ hearty sauces. There is a nice lightness to fresh noodles. You have a point about semolina vs egg pasta--I only make egg pasta. And, I was thinking dried for also shaped pasta, rigatoni, penne, etc. I've never tried making those. Maybe the question better phrased for only semolina vs egg pasta? I have used semolina in my egg pasta but prefer it w/out.

                3. Fresh and dry are different beasts, each with merits.

                  Seems like most posters here think fresh is superior. Not true isn all cases.

                  Try Martelli or Rustichella if you can get them. Both Italian, 100% semolina and bronze die extruded. Best on the planet, in all shapes they make. Martelli only makes 4, Rustichella makes many, all excellent and better than fresh ( a better taste and chew), except anything larger than linguini, then I think fresh is better.

                  If you can't find them, get a "bronzo" Italian dry pasta, there must be some available in your area.

                  3 Replies
                  1. re: Scary Bill

                    There is a shop in Rome called Pastateca and they have over 500 different types of dried pasta. Thanks for the names, I will look for them.

                    1. re: DaisyM

                      Like, Rome, Italy, Rome?

                      You could probably get a great answer from any stranger on the street over the age of three.

                      1. re: Scary Bill

                        Yes, we'll be in Rome,too. I appreciate your suggestions.

                  2. Sounds like a wonderful place to take a class. I'm jealous. I love Italy.

                    There are definite "rules" in Italy as to what sauces go with which pastas. If you think I'm wrong try suggesting that in your cooking class and you'll probably get an ear full. Of course here in the "new world" we have "new rules" - so we do anything here.

                    There is no better place to learn about fresh pastas than in Italy, so I'm glad you decided to do 2 fresh and 1 dried pasta dish. If it were me . . . .I don't know if I could pick just 3 . . . . but I would hope to find a dried pasta dish that calls for a long slow cooked sauce. In Italy this will typically be made with some sort of meat which is then removed and served as a second course and the sauce served with a pasta. It is a very traditional way of doing it in Italy and not something we think of here in the States very often.

                    If they are really good - maybe you can get them to demonstrate this method for you!

                    http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/813766

                    So jealous right now . . . .

                    1. Is it really a distinction between dried and fresh or is it egg pasta and water based.?Pappardelle and tagliatelle would be two egg, and often fresh pastas, that are served with heavy ragus. Spaghetti and linguine are to water based pasta, most often dried, that are served with both heavy and light sauces such a pesto or a simple butter and fresh tomato for a misto di mare.

                      Most of my experience with making pasta at home is with egg based pasta, but I have also bought egg based pasta that have been completely dried. Hence my question.

                      jb

                      16 Replies
                      1. re: JuniorBalloon

                        On the recipe list there is a category of "dry pasta" with 65 dishes and the other category is "home made pasta and gnocchi" which has 103 dishes. And those are just the pasta options. I'm leaning towards bucatini with lamb ragu as one choice. I wish I had some right now.

                        1. re: DaisyM

                          Would it be possible to pos tthe list? I'm curoius what they are calling dry pasta.

                          You are going to love the class. We took one in Siena and had a great time.

                          Buon viaggio,

                          jb

                          1. re: JuniorBalloon

                            FIRST COURSES
                            Dry pasta:
                            1. SALTED ANCHOCIES SAUCE
                            2. LINGUINE WITH MONK FISH SAUCE
                            3. WITCH‟S HAIR VENETIAN STYLE
                            4. LINGUINE WITH MANIT SHRIMPS
                            5. PENNE IN THE “COCCIO” WITH SCORPION FISH
                            6. PACCHERI WITH SEA FOOD
                            7. PASTA WITH FRESH SARDINES
                            8. PASTA WITH SEA URCHINS
                            9. PENNE WITH BLACK INK AND PECORINO CHEESE
                            10. SAUCE WITH “PATELLE” ( SINGLE VALVE SHELLS)
                            11. SAUCE WITH “BOGHE” (SMALL WHITE FISH)
                            12. SEA URCHIN WITH RED SAUCE
                            13. SPAGHETTI WITH CLAMS AND PINE NUTS
                            14. SPAGHETTI ALLO SCOGLIO (MIXED SEA FOOD)
                            15. SPAGHETTI WITH FAVOLLO (LOCAL CRAB)
                            16. SPAGHETTI WITH MUSSELS AND WILD FENNEL
                            17. BLACK SPAGHETTI WITH GINGER
                            18. SPAGHETTI WITH CLAMS
                            19. SPAGHETTI WITH SEA URCHIN AND MUSSELS
                            20. TAGLIATELLE WITH DENTEX
                            21. PASTICCIO OF MACCHERONI (MEAT SAUCE)
                            22. BUCATINI WITH LAMB RAGU‟
                            23. BUCATINI AMATRICIANA
                            24. SHELL SHAPED PASTA WITH GORGONZOLA AND PISTACHIOS
                            25. BOW TIE PASTA WITH PINE NUTS SAUCE
                            26. SPAGHETTI AL RANCETTO (CURED BACON)
                            27. SPAGHETTI CARBONARA
                            28. SPAGHETTI WITH BREAD CRUMBS
                            29. BOW TIE PASTA WITH SPRING AROMAS
                            30. BOW TIE PASTA PIZZAIOLA
                            6
                            31. BOW TIE PASTA WITH YELLOW PUMPKIN
                            32. FUSILLI WITH SPINACH
                            33. FUSILLI VESUVIANA
                            34. FUSILLI WITH OLIVES
                            35. GARGANELLI WITH ZUCCHINI AND BRIE CHEESE
                            36. LINGUINE WITH LEMON SAUCE
                            37. LINGUINE PUTTANESCA
                            38. ORECHHIETTE PESTO AND CHERRY TOMATOES
                            39. ORECCHIETTE WITH TURNIP TOPS
                            40. ORECCHIETTE WITH EGGPLANT AND SMOKED SCAMORZA
                            41. PASTA ALLA NORMA
                            42. PASTA CAPRESE
                            43. PASTA WITH ARTICHOKES
                            44. PASTA ZUCCHINE AND MELANAZANE
                            45. PASTA IN A MOULD WITH VEGETABLES
                            46. PENNE GREVIGIANA
                            47. PENNE VESUVIANA WITH BELL PEPPERS
                            48. PENNE WITH ZUCCHINI
                            49. PENNE WITH BELL PEPPERS AND FLORENTINE PESTO
                            50. YELLOW PENNE
                            51. PENNE STRASCICATE
                            52. REGINETTE WITH PESTO
                            53. RIGATONI WITH EGGPLANT
                            54. RIGATONI WITH VEGETABLES
                            55. SPAGHETTI OLIVE OIL AND GARLIC – AGLIO OLIO
                            56. STRINGOZZI WITH OLIVE
                            57. FUSILLI WITH SPICY TOMATO SAUCE N
                            58. ORECCHIETTE WITH BROCCOLI AND CAULIFLOWER N
                            59. SPAGHETTI AGLIO OLIO N
                            60. CASARECCE ZUCCHINI E RICOTTA
                            61. TRABACCOLARA (ENGLISH)
                            62. RIGATONI ALLE MELANZANE (REVISITED)
                            63. SPAGHETTI CON LA BOTTARGA
                            64. CAVEI DE STREGA (in italiano)
                            65. SPAGHETTI ALL‟ASTICE ( in Inglese)
                            66.
                            Home made pasta and gnocchi
                            1. BIGOLI IN CASSO PIPA ( THICK FRESH SPAGHETTI WITH SEA FOOD IN THE OVEN)
                            2. CAPPELLETTI OF THE FEAS
                            3. COLD BLACK LASAGNE WIT CAULIFLOWER AND CRAB
                            4. FISH RAVIOLI
                            5. RAVIOLI WITH PIKE AND ZUCCHINI
                            6. RAVIOLI WITH SCAMPIS AND ASPARAGUS
                            7. RAVIOLI SCAMPIS AND ZUCCHINI
                            8. OPEN RAVIOLO
                            9. SPAGHETTI WITH SEA BAS
                            7
                            10. TAGLIATELLE WITH DENTEX
                            11. TAGLIERINI WITH MUSSELS AND ZUCCHINI
                            12. TAGLIERINI WITH MUSSELS
                            13. TAGLIOLINI WITH RED MULLET CAGLIARITANA
                            14. BLACK TAGLIOLINI WITH WHITE CUTTLE FISH
                            15. AGNOLOTTI PIEDMONT STYLE
                            16. CAPPELLETTI ROMAGNOLI
                            17. CASIUMZEI AMPEZZANI
                            18. CULINGIONES
                            19. PANSOTTI DI RAPOLLI
                            20. RAVIOLI CHEESE AND PEARS
                            21. RAVIOLI FROM CASENTINO
                            22. RAVIOLI FILLED WITH RICOTTA, ARTICHOKES SAUCE
                            23. RAVIOLI OF SMOKED SCAMORZA WITH CHERRY TOMATOES
                            24. RAVIOLI STUFFED WITH ARTICHOK WITH PECORINO SAUCE
                            25. GREEN RAVIOLI WITH EGGPLANTS
                            26. TORDELLI
                            27. TORTELLI OF POTATO FROM MUGELLO
                            28. COCOA RAVIOLO FILLED WITH OLIVE OIL, FONDUE OF PARMIGIANO AND STEWED RADICCHIO
                            29. PUMPKIN TORTELLI
                            30. TORTELLINI IN BRODO
                            31. COFFEE TAGLAITELLE WITH ARTICHOKES
                            32. FETTUCCINE WITH ARUGOLA AND GORGONZOLA
                            33. LASAGNE WITH MUSHROOMS
                            34. LASAGNE WITH MUSHROOMS AND CHESTNUTS
                            35. LASAGNE WITH EGGPLANT AND QUARTIROLO CHEESE
                            36. LASAGNETTA WITH EGGPLANT
                            37. LUNGHETTI OF KAMUT
                            38. MANICOTTI WITH EGGPLANT AND MOZZARELLA
                            39. FRESH PASTA WITH LEMON
                            40. TAGLIATELLE OF BORRAGO
                            41. TAGLIATELLE WITH ARTICHOKES AND WALNUTS
                            42. TAGLIOLINI WITH ZUCCHINI BLOSSOMS
                            43. TAGLIOLINI WITH VEGETABLES
                            44. MACCHERONI WITH LAMB
                            45. LASAGNE
                            46. MACCHERONI STRAPAZZATI WITH RAGU‟
                            47. PAGLIA E FIENO PROSCIUTTO E PISELLI (GREEN AND YELLOW PASTA WITH HAM AND PEAS)
                            48. PAPPARDELLE WITH WILD BOAR
                            49. PICI WIRH SAUSAGE
                            50. TAGLIATELLE WITH CHICKEN LIVER
                            51. ALMOND TAGLIATELLE WITH TURNIP TOPS AND FATTY LIVER
                            52. CANNELLONI STAUFFED WITH BROCCOLI AND CRAB
                            53. COCO ROLL WITH EGGPLANT MOUSSE AND PARMIGIANO FONDUE
                            54. HAZELNUT TAGLIATELLE IN MUSHROOMS SAUCE
                            55. MALTAGLIATI
                            56. PASSATELLI IN A SOUP
                            57. PASTA E FAGIOLI OF MARCELLA
                            58. SFOGLIA OF CHESTNUT PASTA
                            8
                            59. TAGLIATELLE WITH HAZELNUT BUTTER AND TRUFFLE
                            60. COCOA TAGLIOLINI WITH MUSHROOM SAUCE
                            61. TESTAROLI WITH PESTO
                            62. RAVIOLI FILLED WITH CONSOMME‟ N
                            63. RAVIOLI SPINACH AND RICOTTA N
                            64. BASIC PASTA WITH SOY LECITINE N
                            65. CHESTNUT GNOCCHI WITH MUSHROOM SAUCE
                            66. GNOCCHI OF CHICKPEAS
                            67. GNOCCHI OF RICOTTA WITH PEAS AND TRUFFLE
                            68. WHOLE WHEAT GNOCCHI WITH BROCCOLI AND MUSSELS
                            69. BLACK GNOCCHI WITH CUTTLE FISH RAGU‟ AND PECORINO
                            70. GNOCCHI WITH PESTO
                            71. GNOCCHI ALLA BAVA (MELTING CHEESE)
                            72. GNOCCHI PARISIEN
                            73. GNOCCHI ROMANA
                            74. POTATO GNOCCHI WITH SAUSAGE SAUCE
                            75. GNOCCHI OF POTATO AND NETTLES WITH MUSHROOM SAUCE
                            76. PUMPKING GNOCCHI
                            77. FUCSIA GNOCCHI WITH SAFFRON
                            78. GNUDI
                            79. PARISIEN WITH PISTACHIOS AND BLACK TRUFFLE
                            80. MALLOREDDUS WITH PORK SAUCE
                            81. POTATO GNOCCHI WITH BELL PEPPER SAUCE
                            82. STROZZAPRETI (STRUNGLE THE PRIEST) WITH RED RADICCHIO
                            83. CRESPELLE GRATINATE COL RADICCHIO N
                            84. CASUMZIEI AMPEZZANI N
                            85. FILEJA CON BROCCOLI E „NDUJA N
                            86. LASAGNE BASTARDE DELLA LUNIGIANA N
                            87. CRESPELLE AL FORMAGGIO DI FOSSA CON PURE‟ DI FAVE N
                            88. PIZZOCCHERI IN INGLESE N
                            89. TAGLIOLINI ROSSI (PEPERONI) CON ZUCCHINI E SCAMORZA N
                            90. VARIAZIONE SU: HAND MADE COCOA RAVIOLO FILLED WITH OLIVE OIL N
                            91. PICI CON ACCIUHE E BRICIOLE DI PANE ( ANNIE FEOLDE) N
                            92. PAPPARDELLE CON LA LEPRE N
                            93. GNOCHE DE CIADIN COI CRAUTI
                            94. GNOCCHI CON L‟ORTICA
                            95. GNOCCHI ALLA PIEMONTESE
                            96. PISAREI E FASO‟
                            97. CAVATELLI COI CECI
                            98. GNOCCHI DI PATATE E RICOTTA, CARCIOFI E PECORINO (italiano)
                            99. FAGOTTINI PERE E PROSCIUTTO
                            100. TORTELLETTI DI CRISTOFORO DA MESSISBUGO
                            101. TAGLIATELLE DI NOCCIOLE AL TARTUFO MARZUOLO ( in inglese)
                            102. TAGLIATELLE AI FUNGHI

                            1. re: DaisyM

                              OMG - no wonder you are overwhelmed. Wow the choices are crazy. I don't even know how to help or suggest from this . . . . .

                              1. re: thimes

                                I know and those are just the pasta choices! I asked my husband to look at it last night and he got half way through the list and said, "My head is going to explode and I'm starving!"

                              2. re: DaisyM

                                Indeed I'll add a wow at that list. From googling I think I may have a major misconception about pasta. I have always thought that spaghetti and Lingunie were made without eggs, but now I think I'm wrong. Gotta love living and learning.

                                I think your bucatini pick is a good one because it's something you like. If you like gnocchi that is also a good choice as it's more difficult to make and would be great to get some personal, expert instruction. My gnocchi are leadedn, doughie balls.

                                Pick one that you either like or want to learn and you can't go wrong.

                                jb

                                1. re: JuniorBalloon

                                  After doing a bit of research I am not wrong. Phew :o) , but many dried pasta are made with egg. I'm still unsure what the difference is between dried and fresh made pasta. Couldn't I make Linguine, which is just semolina (durum wheat), water, and optional olive oil and salt, and cook it fresh? Does it taste better or have a better texture if it's dried first?

                                  jb

                                  1. re: JuniorBalloon

                                    I've never tried making non-egg pasta; I understand it is much more difficult to get to the right consistency for rolling/cutting. Given the wide selection of dried pasta, I don't think I'd go to the trouble...but that's just me.

                                    1. re: escondido123

                                      Yes, if it's too hard to get right it's not worth it. It only makes sense when it taste sooooooo much better than what you can buy. There is only one store bought pasta that I think is as good as my home made tagliatelle and that's made by bionature. Funny thing is it's a dried, egg pasta. Nice flavor and great texture. It has me thinking about drying my home made egg pasta to see how it changes the taste and texture.

                                      jb

                                      1. re: JuniorBalloon

                                        Junior, that's the only difference -- one is cooked before it dries completely, the other is dried completely. It's just that in the drying process, the texture changes, so that dried pasta has a different texture than fresh pasta after cooking.

                                        I think you'll find that most pasta has egg in it -- try them side by side -- the egg has so much nicer texture and flavor.

                                        When I was teaching in a cooking school (don't get excited, it was for kids, although real food like fresh pasta) -- we did this for lunch for the staff -- we made one batch of egg fettucine, and one batch of flour-oil-water fettucine. The egg batch disappeared, and the other batch went into the trash.

                            2. re: DaisyM

                              mmmm sounds lovely and bucatini is one of my favorite pasta shapes! totally under-used here in the states.

                              maybe
                              1) bucatini with lamb ragu
                              2) home-made pasta turned into a ravioli
                              3) gnocchi or gnudi

                              That would really give you a great spectrum.

                              1. re: thimes

                                Those are great choices. Gnocchi in particular generally requires practice and would be great to try in a class. Tortelli or tortellini would also be good instead of ravioli, but they are labor-intensive.

                                I'm planning to take my first cooking class in Rome in April and can't wait. Enjoy your trip.

                                1. re: lisaonthecape

                                  Have a wonderful trip. What are you making in your cooking class?

                                  1. re: DaisyM

                                    No idea yet--registration is usually about 60 days out. I'm hoping gnocchi or some type of fresh pasta. We make risotto at home fairly often, so I'm comfortable with that.

                              2. re: DaisyM

                                If you can have a pro teach you gnocchi, that would be incredible.

                                1. re: escondido123

                                  I was thinking that, too. It would be tough to decide but I'd do two fresh: one ravioli, one cut and one gnocchi. This one sounds really good:

                                  1. BIGOLI IN CASSO PIPA ( THICK FRESH SPAGHETTI WITH SEA FOOD IN THE OVEN)

                            3. When fresh pasta is used it should be the centerpiece of the dish. The sauce therefore should not overwhelm it. Appreciate it's texture and flavor and delicateness.

                              1 Reply
                              1. re: Chinon00

                                I only make egg pasta, so I very it depending on the pasta/sauce pairing. When I make a braised beef sauce with pappardelle, I roll the dough thicker and cut it wider so it has the right weight for the sauce. I also made chiatarra by keeping it thick enough that when put through the cutter it made square strands. For that I made a carbonara with a raw egg yolk on top....it was lovely.

                              2. Part of the choice has to do with how each one absorbs the sauce. Fresh pasta tends to be paired with something you sauce over it. Dried pasta will absorb the sauce...and is used in recipes that are enhanced by that. And the shape does make a difference as well. A ridged dry penne or rotini
                                will "hold onto" the sauce or pieces of ingredients. A sheet of fresh pasta in a lasagna or as part of a ravioli/raviolo is hard to beat!

                                1. I'm curious about this list. What kind of class is it? I've done a week long cooking school (ok...more like vacation/school) in Tuscany, and a one day cooking class in Rome. But I've never seen a list like this. If you don't mind my asking, what kind of class is this? How long is it? How did you find it?
                                  Just curious.....

                                  1 Reply
                                  1. re: perk

                                    This is a private 1/2 day class at a cooking school in Florence. You pick 3 dishes you want to learn and then have a meal. The list was sent after I had booked the class. I found the school on Tripadvisor. Here's the info.http://www.gigliocooking.com/

                                  2. In Cooking by Hand, by Paul Bertolli, he describes what pastas go with what foods. Even to the detail of what flours to use for certain pasta recipes. There are a lot of example recipes illustrating the pairings of pastas to meats/techniques.

                                    http://www.amazon.com/Cooking-Hand-Pa...