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HAND PULLED NOODLE SHOP 东方兰州拉面 (SHENG WANG) YET ANOTHER TO HIGHLY CONSIDER IN YOUR QUEST FOR GOOD CHINESE NOODLES

jonkyo Jan 1, 2012 06:12 PM

SHENG WANG is located at 27 Eldridge Street, near the northwest end of the first block row, is downstairs. It is almost across the street from Super Taste. This is one of my favored shops for noodles, since trying their la mian (拉面)or thin spaghetti sized freshly pulled noodles。Walking in you will probably notice some customers in the dining area that is clean and comfortable, with a good number of friendly staff going in and out the kitchen, taking care of customers, and waiting to take your order. They speak English, but the menu with English, is in large print and very clear.

This is yet another noodle shop with the famed Lanzhou logo (兰州的商标), yet one must understand that the only element of Lanzhou Hand Pulled Noodles (兰州手工拉面)is the fact that the noodles are indeed pulled by hand, and delicious. As I have stated in previous posts, the Lanzhou is only to indicate that they pull the noodles fresh daily, and in some of these shops, they pull them to order. "The most famous Local muslim food is Hand-pulled Noodles. It is probably unique to China and can be made only by a trained cook. Watching an experienced cook making it is like enjoying a juggler show."http://www.islamichina.com/halal/inde...

The capitalization on this style of noodle making beyond the Muslim populations in China has grown much, and has more than a slim representation in NYC Chinatown, and Sheng Wang is one, and offering one of the best in varieties of animal meats, organs and bones, as well as seafood and fish ball and vegetable noodles, and even have rabbit, and I am very curious about their House Special noodle dish.

Sheng Wang / Dong Fang Lanzhou La Mian (东方兰州拉面) also feature the thicker peeled or knife cut noodles, representing a style popularized in China from Shan Xi Province. On the menu this is called Peeled Noodles, and they are not uniform like pulled noddles, and and appear a bit thick and wide: 山西切削面 'shanxi qiexiao mian'.

Both Peeled and Hand Pulled,about 31 choices each, the flavors on offer are what you'd expect from a Chinese shop in the US selling to a local Chinese.

They have 31 flavors of La Mian (hand Pulled Noodles) mostly in soups, but requests for soup separate, or dry options not a problem. These noodles offers are: Ox Tail, Lamb, Lamb Stomach, Rabbit, and Duck, Seafood, Dumpling, Fuzhou Style Wonton, Vegetable and Egg. Peeled Noodle choices are about the same.

Maybe one of the few places to get Rabbit, 兔肉拉面, Rabbit La Mian.

They have a variety of meat sections and organs from both the COW and the PIG: stomach, feet, bone, tendon, sliced meat, pork chop, spare ribs, pig intestine. The beef and pork selections take up much space on both the Peeled Noodles (山西切削面)and the Hand Pulled Noodles Selections。

鸭肉 DUCK:

The duck optoins are three: Duck with Taro; Roast Duck; and Duck Noodle Soup.

The portions and other ingredients are substantial, and no skimp portions of meats with these dishes that range from 4.50 to 6.00. The freid options are 6.00, and the Wonton and Dumpling noodles are 4.50, the others about 5.00,

They only have two fried options such as beef and seafood. But don't let that disappoint you if you desire the other flavors without soup and fried. I had no problem getting my pig stomach fried, after I changed my mind, and cost 1.00 extra.

I had ordered Beef Fried Hand Pulled Noodles (那个牛肉炒拉面),but before the were to cook it up I asked if I could switch it to Pig Stomach Noodles, and the waitress asked if I still wanted it fried like the beef, and I stated "yes".

The results, tender non-grizzly and so delicious huge heafty long thick cuts of pig stomach stir freid with thin spaghetti sized fresh pulled noodles, with some greens, and some egg. The portion was quite good.

On an earlier visit I ordered from the Shan Xi Knife Cut (Peeled) Noodles section which includes 31 itmes ranging almost identical to the Hand Pulled selection. I had what has been termed in English at other Chinese noodles shops as Beef Brisket, or 牛腩 'niunan', but at Sheng Wang it is only refered to in English as Beef Stew Peeled Noodles (Knife Cut).

Though there are better places for Beef Brisket, especially if you know of Bo KY Bayard as well as Grand, and Henan Flavor (Forsyth/Flushings), SHENG WANG'S other selections offered are wonderful, prepared with skill, tender and tasty, and many cannot be found at Bo Ky and Henan Flavor.

Shang Wang / Dong Fang (东方兰州手拉面) is great for their Hand Pulled Noodles, and one of my favored spots for a fried dish of noodles or soup noodles. It is a really good choice because simply due to the large selection of dishes, easy to navigate menu, friendly tri-lingual staff. Most flavors, inlcuding the rabbit, both having representation in Peeled Noodles and Hand Pulled.

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Sheng Wang
27 Eldridge St, New York, NY 10002

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  1. foodmonk RE: jonkyo Jan 2, 2012 04:26 PM

    We had bowls of noodles with beef (and a fish ball) as well as dumplings early this last fall. We ordered the dumplings because two ladies were making them at the table next to us and we thought -- why not? They are certainly not frozen ... I don't know enough about this type of cuisine and am only familiar with Super Taste as far as other establishments go. But the meal tasted good and was very satisfying on a cold day.

    1 Reply
    1. re: foodmonk
      jonkyo RE: foodmonk Jan 3, 2012 12:54 PM

      I recommend the fried pulled noodles myself, with all due respect.

      The Peeled Noodles 切削面 (qiexiaomian)were for me at least nothing too specail to note, but I had them in soup, not fried. I do prefer this style of noodles at 河南风味 Henan Flavor Forsythe just up from Hester across the park or Flushings. I do have to say, though I was not overly impressed with their Peeled noodles, the broth was was quite good, and in sum it was good to eat.

      I very recently went to 88 Sing. The noodle dish of Fried Yang Rou Mian , that is Lamb Dry Noodle, which seemed to be actually fried, was so unimpressive. I actually regretted going there, for I did not even finish the dish, got it to go, and may eat it for breakfast. The only plus was the Lamb or goat meat with skin of the animal, and quite tasty. Thus stated I do recommend giving it a try for your own critique. The staff I dealt with were very freindly and professional, and spoke 普通话 very well.

      The following list has all left me in a satisfying state after eating:

      老地方 Lao Di Fang Forsyth,

      东方兰州拉面 Sheng Wang,

      Super Taste

      啊平 Ah Ping around the corner from Sing 88,

      老三 Lao San just down East Broadway

      闽江 Min Jiang and the one directly opposite on East Broadway (both open very late and serve beer for $2).

    2. l
      Lau RE: jonkyo Jan 3, 2012 12:06 PM

      next time you go, there is a dish that is much better than their beef noodle soup. their stir fried knife cut noodles, its says something like 炒刀削面 (chao dao xiao mian) is quite good, its stir fried with beef, some vegetables and egg. it's very slightly sweet as well.

      10 Replies
      1. re: Lau
        MWinston RE: Lau Jan 4, 2012 09:11 AM

        I had this last week and really enjoyed it, despite the beef being on the gristly side, it was still very tender and moist.

        1. re: MWinston
          jonkyo RE: MWinston Jan 4, 2012 03:08 PM

          If one finds the beef to be not up to standards, there is plenty of other selections that I have found to be quite good, making it a prefered destination when my stomach is craving for some Chinese noodles.

        2. re: Lau
          f
          foodwhisperer RE: Lau May 22, 2012 06:57 PM

          Sheng Wang is absolutely amazing. This section of Chinatown is amazing. I find it more interesting than what I see in Queens, and everyone loves Chinatown in Queens.
          In any case, I ate at Shen Wang, after being turned away from Rong Hang ( they were full and not so friendly) I will try there again with a Chinese friend. Sheng Wang has the friendliest people working there. Interestingly, we were the only "white " people ( Lo Fon) there, but by the time we left several more entered, perhaps because they saw us there. I expressed interest in the noodles and in the potato balls the waitress had been making at the table next to us. The waitress ordered for us. We had potato ball soup, the potato was filled with some kind of meat , and was delicious. We then had the hand pulled, super long noodles with a marinated beef and bok choy. Absolutely wonderful. Then The last dish was either peel noodle , or knife cut. The menu on the table , under the glass only had hand pulled and peel. But the waitress said she will bring us noodle that was just made. She said flat sheet cut with knife. So I attached a picture but it isn't the best picture. These noodles were the size of chow fun, but had ragged edges and I believe they were rice noodles. They were served with manila clams , fish cake, bok choy and shrimp with heads attached. Another delicious meal. These were the best noodles I ever had in China town. I have had other hand pulled, but these were far beyond I want to try their more exotic dishes. Also, their hot oil, is really hot. We talk about Thai hot, well this is just as hot.

           
           
           
           
           
           
           
          1. re: foodwhisperer
            jonkyo RE: foodwhisperer May 24, 2012 06:42 PM

            I like their hot oil and this and hot sauce at places in Chinatown tend to be a factor in my decisions where to eat.

            Since having first their peeled noodle, often called daoqiemain (刀切面), and second their La Mian (拉面) or hand pulled noodles, and compared them, I always go for the hand pulled 拉面.

            dao 刀 is knife; qie 切 is cut and mian 面/麵 is noodles, for those wanting further lingual explanation.

            Still one of my favored places for Chinese noodles, this side of the Pacific that is.

            1. re: jonkyo
              f
              foodwhisperer RE: jonkyo May 24, 2012 09:23 PM

              why do they call them :peel " noodle. I loved both types. And the fresh made potato balls with meat inside was so good. I really can't stop raving about those noodles. They were the best. So much better than xian xian. Not even close. This place is amazing. That street has many fish ball places, i bet the fish ball is good there.
              I do want to try the busy place Rong Hang, a block away ,, very busy place.

              1. re: foodwhisperer
                h
                Humbucker RE: foodwhisperer May 25, 2012 04:30 AM

                They're called peel noodles because the noodles are "peeled" off a ball of dough with a knife.

                1. re: Humbucker
                  f
                  foodwhisperer RE: Humbucker May 26, 2012 10:14 PM

                  Thank you for the explanation. I love peel noodles at Sheng Weng

                  1. re: Humbucker
                    jonkyo RE: Humbucker May 27, 2012 08:55 PM

                    Of course, seen it done.

                  2. re: foodwhisperer
                    foodmonk RE: foodwhisperer May 27, 2012 09:23 AM

                    Are those balls made from potato or are they made from some other sort of starch? I could not tell. The ones we had there had fish in them and were quite good.

                    1. re: foodmonk
                      f
                      foodwhisperer RE: foodmonk May 27, 2012 07:36 PM

                      Potato and filled with meat

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