HOME > Chowhound > Home Cooking >

Foie Gras?

Will Owen Dec 27, 2011 11:08 AM

Never mind how it happened, but on Christmas I came into possession of a jar of Foie Gras de Canard. Not paté, but the whole lump, listed ingredients being the liver, sel, poivre et sucre, period. Now, at the moment I am the sole functioning human carnivore in the house, and even when she ate meat Mrs. O disapproved of foie gras on humanitarian grounds, so I'm not going to go slurping it up in front of her, though I may very well share some with her mom. As it's in a sealed jar, I'm assuming it's as cooked as it ever needs to be, and may therefore simply be cut and spread onto melba toast or nice crackers. Any other simple presentations come to mind, anyone? I know more about what to have with caviar than this stuff, though I've always wanted to try it.

  1. Click to Upload a photo (10 MB limit)
Delete
  1. hotoynoodle RE: Will Owen Dec 27, 2011 11:11 AM

    mix it with butter and spread it under the skin of chicken to roast.

    4 Replies
    1. re: hotoynoodle
      Will Owen RE: hotoynoodle Dec 27, 2011 03:27 PM

      That would be even crueler than just eating it in front of my dearest. She's not avoiding meat because she hates it, but because young Mr. Foer's book "Eating Animals" convinced her that it's wrong. So it'd be bad enough to sit across the table calmly laying slices onto toast, but devouring a succulent chicken in front of her would be brutal, given how much she loves it.

      1. re: Will Owen
        k
        Kayasuma RE: Will Owen Dec 27, 2011 03:30 PM

        There's always divorce...

        1. re: Kayasuma
          hotoynoodle RE: Kayasuma Dec 27, 2011 05:54 PM

          i wasn't suggesting eating it in front of her, lol. but, hey, ya know, we are the top of the food chain and all that.

          1. re: hotoynoodle
            Will Owen RE: hotoynoodle Dec 28, 2011 01:58 PM

            Next time you encounter a grizzly, you can remind him of that.

            I disagree with Mrs. O's conclusions, not her reasons for objecting. She and many animal lovers firmly believe that the feeding process, even though the birds come running and wait very impatiently for their turn, is fundamentally exploitative and therefore wrong. I'm of the same mind as I am when I read about some real fox of a young teacher being hauled into court for "sexual abuse" of a teenage boy. Yup, it's illegal; nope, she shouldn't have done it. But ask the kid what HE thinks.

    2. a
      acgold7 RE: Will Owen Dec 27, 2011 11:12 AM

      Even though it's likely cooked, you could still slice it and sear it quickly and serve on grilled toast points, maybe with some caramelized onion or shallots and apples. Or put seared slices on top of grilled tenderloin tournedos.

      I've got a whole fresh one sitting in the fridge waiting for this treatment on New Year's Eve.

      1. d
        DeppityDawg RE: Will Owen Dec 27, 2011 11:48 AM

        If you haven't tried it before, then go with your first idea. Serve yourself a nice slice on a plate, slightly chilled, with some lightly toasted bread. There are some traditional accompaniments: figs or fig jam, onion jam, sweet white wine. But it's easy to overdo the sweet. The texture and the flavor of the foie gras should be the star, with minimal additional preparation.

        If you don't like it this way, then you can consider mixing it into sauces or otherwise using it as a flavoring, but it's kind of a shame to do this with whole foie gras.

        1. boredough RE: Will Owen Dec 27, 2011 12:30 PM

          I agree with DDawg's recommendation of fig or onion jam, but would also suggest green tomato jam (if you can find it) or rhubarb jam (more readily available). Also have sea salt on hand to sprinkle on top. Toasted brioche would be a nicer accompaniment than melba toast IMO.

          1 Reply
          1. re: boredough
            sunshine842 RE: boredough Dec 27, 2011 12:52 PM

            even lightly toasted Wonder Bread, crusts trimmed, would be better than melba toast, IMO (too!)

            Don't sear it once it's been preserved -- it will melt clean away, leaving you with a puddle of rich yellow fat that tastes delicious, but is a crying shame to have instead of a nice slice of nicely-preserved foie.

            Also -- put it in the fridge overnight, then pull it out 15-20 minutes before serving. This keeps it nice and firm for slicing, but just warm enough to draw out the flavors.

          2. ipsedixit RE: Will Owen Dec 27, 2011 09:06 PM

            Make foie gras stuffed french toast.

            1. s
              sarahe1 RE: Will Owen Dec 28, 2011 06:18 PM

              I think it would be delicious cut into small cubes and mixed into fresh pasta with a very simple butter or olive oil sauce

              3 Replies
              1. re: sarahe1
                Will Owen RE: sarahe1 Dec 29, 2011 12:58 PM

                This is about the most attractive suggestion yet, to my taste. I'm thinking more along the lines of a sort of simple pesto, with just finely-chopped fresh parsley, a little garlic and olive oil - the sort of thing that actually tastes better warm than hot, which is nice if you don't want your foie gras to melt. Since I'm sharing this only with myself, as far as I know, this won't use a lot of it, thus leaving enough for plenty of quality crackering.

                1. re: Will Owen
                  s
                  sarahe1 RE: Will Owen Dec 29, 2011 01:17 PM

                  That sounds delicious, except that I would be very, very careful with the garlic. Foie has such a delicate and specific taste that you don't want the garlic to compete with it. I think the parsley might cut through the fat very nicely!

                  1. re: sarahe1
                    Will Owen RE: sarahe1 Dec 30, 2011 04:52 PM

                    When I said "a little" I meant it! My normal pesto is a large basil-garlic buzz, and I tend to load up the pasta with it. What I'm contemplating here is a mere whisper, probably just a crushed clove infused into the oil and removed, and then dressing the pasta very lightly with the pesto.

              Show Hidden Posts