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Mandoline

Howdy folks,

Does anyone know where to get a decent mandoline? I see that gourmet warehouse has some, anywhere else to look? I'm in Abbotsford but a trip to Vancouver is not a problem.

Also looking for general advice as I've never bought one of these before. It's a gift and I know my friend isn't looking for anything serious but I'd like to get something decent.

Thanks for any words of wisdom :)

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  1. I've had this one for the past several years:
    http://www.amazon.com/Kyocera-Double-...
    It's great and super easy to use and clean -- I use it almost daily. It's starting to get dull though, so I'm going to replace it with this adjustable version:
    http://www.amazon.com/Kyocera-CSN-202...

    I also have a big DeBuyer that I bought before I knew about the above ones -- an older version of this one:
    http://www.amazon.com/De-Buyer-ULTRA-...
    It's good for big-volume veg slicing for gratins and onion soup, but it's tricky to use, a pain to set up (and clean up), and pretty bulky to store. I never would have bought it had I known about the smaller ones. In fact, I think I'm going to put it on craigslist.

    2 Replies
    1. re: Steve Green

      I have the Kyocera as well and love how easy it is to clean.

      1. re: Steve Green

        Love the Kyocera- just got another one for my mom for Xmas!

      2. You should be able to track down a Benriner.

        1 Reply
        1. re: Kagemusha

          Do you mean that cheap white plastic thing they use on Iron Chef America? :)

        2. I have a simple Benriner but my advice is if you give someone a mandoline, ALWAYS give them a cut resistant glove, too.

          3 Replies
            1. re: walker

              No cuts to date. Use the plastic guard when I can but otherwise go it bare handed with extreme caution. I keep the blade well sharpened so it should be a clean cut if it happens. This is another thing I like about the Benriner. The blade is easy to remove

              1. re: scubadoo97

                I don't think that I have ever used it without drawing blood!! Did buy a glove, but my FP has so many different blades that I use that most of the time.

            2. As this board has taught me well, never assume something is generally of poor quality based on just one person's bad experience, but if something pops up on this board in a recurring manner, take heed! Ok, here's one bad experience with a Matfer with exoglass frame. The regular blade is fine and easy to use. The whole thing is easy to work with and easy to clean. The
              Julienne blades suck. They insert into the side, and obviously the slot was put in about 1 mm off. Things that are supposed to have been julienned are cut not quite through. Whatever you get, I highly recommend a Kevlar glove. Pushers are generally IMHO hard to use.

              2 Replies
              1. re: tim irvine

                Julienne is the strong point for Benriner. It's as though it was designed specifically for the Japanese (and Vietnamese) salad of carrots and daikon.

                1. re: tim irvine

                  The pusher that came with the Benriner isn't good, but I found a more useful gripper on a mini slicer I found at Daiso (Japanese dollar store). It's a springy plastic 'clamp'.

                2. Kyoceras mentioned above are slicers only. To me a true mandoline has interchangeable blades so can julienne and slice and usually differing sizes. It does take up more storage space. Also, really heed the kevlar glove recommendations. These things are SO dangerous. I find I don't use mine very often because I'm scared of it. And they do not work for sweet potatoes. You have to push so hard it is terrifying.