HOME > Chowhound > General Topics >

Discussion

How Thick Is That Shake?

In St. Louis, where I am, there's a frozen custard shake called the Concrete that pretty much sets the standard locally for how thick they are; the Concrete is handed to the customer upside down. The DQ Blizzard is modeled on it, and so are the shakes at Danny Meyer's Shake Shack, Meyer being raised here.

I personally prefer them to be thin enough to take through a straw, as one of our best burger joints serves it. I can't get the logic of them being so dense that you, in Joseph Wambaugh's memorable phrase, "have to suck your teeth out" to get them. Is this a localism? Please discuss.

  1. Click to Upload a photo (10 MB limit)
Delete
  1. To be fair to the Ted Drewes concoction, I think the Concrete is supposed to be eaten with a spoon as opposed to a straw, right? Isn't that why the Concrete is served with a spoon?

    In any event, I take no position on how thick a shake (or custard) should be.

    All I know is that when it's about 90F and 10000% humidity on a mid-August afternoon in St. Louis, there are few things finer than a Pistachio Concrete.

    1. Unless there has been some liquid introduced into the shake, to me. it's really not a shake, but custard or soft serve with toppings added or blended in.

      Most frozen treats benefit from warming up above 5*F. At that point it allows your taste buds to work......I find the shakes you describe benefit from melting a little bit too....but if I can't wait, I just use a spoon

      1. I hate shakes like that. There are few things in life that are so annoying.
        If you can't sip it through a straw, it should not be called a "shake" or "frappe."
        If I want ice cream, I'll order ice cream!

        1. Equally annoying are the far too many restaurants that try to save a penny and give you these thin-walled, small-diameter soda straws that just don't work with shakes.

          4 Replies
          1. re: aynrandgirl

            Interesting. Haven't come across THAT before in years. Where are you located, and are these franchises or independent owners?

            1. re: lemons

              I've seen it in Florida, Texas, and Arizona. Primarily mom & pop joints.

            2. re: aynrandgirl

              Remember when straws were made of paper? One good suck and they collapsed flatter than a pancake and your eardrums burst.

              1. re: acgold7

                Or fell apart because you didn't drink fast enough.

            3. I don't have any experience with St. Louis; the only "concrete" I've ever had has been at Shake Shack. I never thought the concrete was a shake at all as SS sells both concretes and shakes. I thought a concrete was custard with something blended in, to be eaten with a spoon. It never occurred to me to confuse it with a shake.

              1 Reply
              1. re: woodleyparkhound

                And that's very logical. It's just an evolutionary process, I guess. But the original is served w/ a spoon and a straw as well.