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Best Salmon Recipe?

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I want to make a wild salmon dish for x-mas eve. Want a great recipe. Maybe salmon in lobster sauce. Something decadent. Any great salmon recipes welcome!

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  1. What kind, is it fresh or frozen and can you grill or does this have to be an inside cooking thing?

    If its fresh, go very natural and grill if possible. I love lobster but I think a sauce might be a bit heavy on the salmon. I like a light lemon caper sauce drizzled over it after grilling or broiling.

    1. Salmon is nominated for dish of the month in October. http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/869782

      Vote for it if you would like to see it featured.

      1. Tradition here for Christmas Eve ,baked in puff pastry,with many variations over the years for seasoning and sauces on the side.

        1. I've done a salmon en croute with a scallop lobster mousse and herbed beurre blanc that I consider sinfully good and I don't like un-smoked salmon as a general rule. The mousse is layered on top of the salmon which get wrapped in puff pastry dough and baked. Make the sauce while the fish is baking. The original recipe was from Paul Bocuse but I lost that long ago and just make it from memory and inspiration.

          4 Replies
          1. re: KateBChi

            It sounds like a coubillac (sp?). Would you please record your memory and inspirations for our benefit? The best fish dish I've ever had in my 70 years was something similar at Paul Bocuse when the chef was in the kitchen.

            1. re: Joebob

              A coubiliac or koubiliac variation indeed! It is more refined than the Russian version which often includes hard boiled eggs and rice. A friend of mine supposedly begged for the recipe from Bocuse's restaurant sometime in the 1980's. It was written on stained notebook paper and we had to seriously fill in the blanks. I remember the first time we made it, for my parents, we split the duties. He made the puff pastry dough and I made the scallop & lobster (possibly shrimp) mousse. He picked the pin bones from the salmon and I made the herbed beurre blanc. It's been awhile since I made this but I do remember thinking that salmon that isn't smoked can be divine!

              Basically the process was as follows:

              Seafood Mousse
              sea scallops
              steamed lobster meat (1 1/4 lb lobster steamed removed from shells and shells reserved for making lobster stock)
              lobster stock (shells cooked with shallots, carrots, onions, pureed and strained)
              egg whites
              cream or creme fraiche
              cayenne pepper or piment des espelette
              lemon juice
              minced shallots
              minced chives
              whiz all in a food processor and chill for a few hours till ready to bake fish

              For the salmon - The first time I made this we cooked one large piece in puff pastry but subsequent incarnations have been individualized. I also don't bother making puff pastry dough but buy DuFour's or another all butter dough and thaw, roll out and cut to fit individual
              servings. Salt & pepper the salmon. Place a large dollop of mousse on top of the pastry, top with salmon and follow with another large dollop of mousse. Encase in dough and crimp/seal with egg wash. Brush egg wash on top of dough and bake.

              While salmon is cooking make the beurre blanc. I use white wine, maybe champagne, white wine vinegar, shallots, peppercorns, bay leaves, butter and wee bit of heavy cream plus fresh herbs (I am partial to tarragon but have used sorrel to very good effect).

              The sauce is placed on the plate and is topped with the salmon en croute. If you want to gild the lily top with more sauce.

              I can't really say if this is close to the original as it has been years since I first made it and it has been reincarnated by me several times.

              1. re: KateBChi

                There was thread about this Russian fish pie several years ago.

                http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/2848...

                I mentioned at the time that there's a Russian Alaska variation on this that is particularly associated with Christmas. In rural Alaska it's going to be relatively simple affair, layers of rice, cabbage, salmon and hard boiled eggs in a pie shell.

                Now that I look at that thread, I remember making it for a Christmas eve gathering several years ago.

                1. re: KateBChi

                  YUMMY! That certainly should fill the "great" and "decadent" requirements of the OP. But do they have the fortitude required?

            2. Wrap individual salmon fillets in prosciutto and bake in a hot oven (400-425) for about 8 min. Drizzle around the plate with balsamic reduction and basil oil, garnish with a small mound of lemon zest.

              1. What cut are you think of, and for how many people?

                The best salmon that I've fixed was a simple pan fried steak, with nothing other than some olive oil, salt and pepper. That ideal has a golden crust, and interior that is just starting to flake. But it requires some practice, lots of attention, and certain amount of luck.

                But it's hard to do for a lot of people, and doesn't sit around well.

                2 Replies
                1. re: paulj

                  I agree, simple is best, especially if you get a good wild salmon. If you had a whole one you could bake it with herbs, garlic and lemon in the cavity.

                  A good piece of fish doesn't really need anything done to it to make it superb.

                  1. re: paulj

                    The best salmon I ever had was on a Salmon party fishing boat on the way back to the dock. The deckhand took a couple of salmon out of the catch box and grilled em right then and there. Add the fact that we had been out in the sun for 6 -7 hours with only snacks.

                    Hunger and freshness... you can't get a better herb, sauce or condiment than that!