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care of Bialetti Mocha pot, 6 cup

I have a new Bialetti Mocha pot. I know NOT to clean the pot with soap...just to rinse it out with water and be sure all is completely dry. The limited instructions say it's extremely important to let it dry out completely before you put it back together and set it out invitingly on the counter for next use. Not to do so will cause it to corrode. (I know what rust looks like but not sure what aluminum corrosion looks like but I'm sure it's not tastey)

Question 1 of 3. My question is about the removable/replaceable gasket and screen under the coffee pot (upper chamber) NOT the funnel/screen that holds the grounds. Since the instructions say it's important to let the pot get completely dried out, are we supposed to take out the gasket and screen from under the coffee pot (upper chamber) so they and the screwing tread can dry out??

So far I've left the removable/replaceable gasket and screen alone except to rinse off . I'm concerned if I remove them to dry and then replace them repeatedly that it will stretch/wear them out more quickly.

Question 2 of 3. Also, I've read that the upper chamber where the coffee ends up should never be cleaned as there's an advantage to leaving the residue to build up "like a patina of flavor".

I rinse it out, but how can it be made to dry so it doesn't corrode if I can't wipe it dry? The instructions say: DO NOT ALLOW TO AIR DRY.. So, the instructions seem to contradict itself.

Question 3 of 2 isn't really a question: the funnel/screen with the grounds. The inside of it is inaccessable and never gets dry so interior corrosion there is a possible problem.

What do those of you with experience adise.

Thanks

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  1. When aluminum corrodes, it pits and develops what appears to be a white fuzzy look, which is the irregular shape of the corrosion.

    My advice, if no one with experience answers you, would be to call Bialetti and ask them. If their printed instructions are confusing or contradictory, they may appreciate you pointing it out to them.

    1 Reply
    1. re: dcrb

      dcrb
      Thanks, I'll know those signs to look for corrosion of aluminum.
      I'll contact the company and see if they respond. The company is in Italy. There's a phone number but it says "Italy Only". I'll email them. The instructions are like a Rosetta Stone in that it's in about 14 languages each with its own little paragraph.

    2. I take it apart, dry it with a paper towel, and then leave it out on the drying rack for a few hours before putting it back together. The gasket and filter too. It is technically, air drying, but it has already been wiped down, so not really. I think the air time just allows any residual moisture to evaporate, which is much less than letting the thing air dry completely. You can't really dry a rubber gasket with a paper towel, it needs air time. NOT taking it apart invites a problem.

      BTW, if you let it air dry right from the rinse, it also develops pretty ugly water spots. No idea of corrosion, because my 9 cupper is not corroded. The water spots were too ugly for me to repeat that one attempt.

      1 Reply
      1. re: RGC1982

        Wow, RGC1982, I'm glad I asked about taking out the gasket. I'll take it out from now on.
        I just got it so glad I know at the start.

        Do you leave the residue in the upper coffee pot? That would mean it would remain moist.

        Thanks

      2. BTW I'm referring to the INTERIOR of the pot in my original post.

        1. Sorry to take so long to get back to you. Here is a link with the US contact information

          http://www.bialettishop.com/ContactUs...

          Hope this helps.

          1 Reply
          1. By all means, clean out the upper chamber. Nothing like a little rancid coffee oils to provide a nice coating.

            1 Reply
            1. re: poser

              thanks, poser, I will clean it out and dry it out

            2. "...Also, I've read that the upper chamber where the coffee ends up should never be cleaned as there's an advantage to leaving the residue to build up "like a patina of flavor"."

              Seriously? I've never heard of any coffee making device recommending anything but using spotlessly clean equipment.

              1 Reply
              1. re: taos

                taos

                Yes, I read that in several of the "review" posts of Amazon.com where I bought the Bialetti pot.

                Some say to never clean out the residue from the coffee chamber and then they contradict themselves by saying to make sure it is dry and not to let it air dry. This is why I am asking in Chowhound.

                I'm glad I double checked for advice in Chowhound and will now know to clean out both chambers (the water tank and the coffee pot) with clean water and wipe dry.

                Thanks so much to you all

              2. Some say to never clean out the residue from the coffee chamber and they contradict what they say by saying to make sure it is dry and not to let it air dry.
                I'm glad I double checked for advice in Chowhound and will now know to clean out both chambers (the water tank and the coffee pot) with clean water and wipe dry.
                Thanks so much to you all

                1. I have info straight from Bialetti.

                  I went to the Bialetti link that "dcrb" posted in this thread, and called the 800 number. The very informative rep told me that it's the BOTTOM chamber that you should not wipe clean and only rinse out with hot water(!). The coffee oils seep down after brewing and build up, thereby "seasoning" it, which discolors the metal. She said IF it becomes too gunky, you can use a solution of 1 part vinegar and 1 part water to dissolve it, just rinse well. About the upper cup, a buildup of oils there "wouldn't make a difference to the flavor of the coffee" and should be "wiped out frequently".

                  The minimum care for your moka is no soap ever, and separate all parts every few brewings for cleaning with hot water and a wipe down.

                  Well, I don't know about everyone else, but I feel vindicated. I've been cleaning my mokas according to my gut, and it's exactly how Bialetti recommends.

                  ( If I had to do anything more involved, I'd buy an $80 De'Longhi machine and get a REAL espresso! )

                  Hope this helps some people.

                  1 Reply
                  1. re: Dennisf88

                    ( If I had to do anything more involved, I'd buy an $80 De'Longhi machine and get a REAL espresso! )"

                    LOL! That's a good one.