HOME > Chowhound > Manhattan >

Why are there no really good Indian restaurants?

4
4 seasons Dec 11, 2011 10:31 AM

I have a guest coming for the holidays and he wants spicy, full-flavored delicious Indian food, Either places have bit the dust that were once very good, and the reminders serve overcooked, dreary v ery boring food, Why? are there any not on these boards secreted away?

  1. Click to Upload a photo (10 MB limit)
Delete
  1. r
    RGR RE: 4 seasons Dec 11, 2011 10:52 AM

    Have you been to Tulsi or Junoon? Imo, they both serve spicy, full-flavored, delicious Indian cuisine.

    Tulsi photos: http://www.flickr.com/photos/11863391...

    Junoon photos: http://www.flickr.com/photos/11863391...

    http://thewizardofroz.wordpress.com

    -----
    Tulsi
    211 E 46th St, New York, NY 10017

    Junoon
    27 W 24th St, New York, NY 10010

    1. Peter Cuce RE: 4 seasons Dec 11, 2011 08:10 PM

      There are some great spots in Queens.

      1 Reply
      1. re: Peter Cuce
        f
        FoodDabbler RE: Peter Cuce Dec 11, 2011 08:36 PM

        Which? (Point to appropriate Outer Space -- sorry, Boroughs -- thread if necessary.)

      2. m
        michelleats RE: 4 seasons Dec 11, 2011 09:41 PM

        That's a rather broad and unsupported claim. Is your friend looking for north Indian? South Indian? Vegetarian / non-veg? Family style / haute? Which places have you tried and found lacking?

        1. c
          comiendosiempre RE: 4 seasons Dec 12, 2011 05:01 AM

          We actually just had a very good meal at Chola. Not every dish was superb but some were. They had the best chicken tandoori we have had since Asia. Place was packed for a weekend dinner. Though we still need to get to Junoon.

          -----
          Chola
          232 East 58th Street, New York, NY 10022

          10 Replies
          1. re: comiendosiempre
            r
            RGR RE: comiendosiempre Dec 12, 2011 09:32 AM

            The one time I went to Chola, I found the food rather disappointing in comparison to its younger sibling Dhaba, where I thought the food was very good. Neither is anything like the haute style of Junoon or Tulsi.

            http://thewizardofroz.wordpress.com

            1. re: RGR
              NYJewboy RE: RGR Dec 13, 2011 06:27 AM

              Precisely the problem. It is the 'haute' style that kills it for me. I have been to both places, and although the food was good (not great), the preciousness and tiny portions rendered it a bad experience. I think most people want an Indian place to be more direct, relaxed, and less presentation oriented.

              1. re: NYJewboy
                r
                RGR RE: NYJewboy Dec 13, 2011 09:18 AM

                When you say "both places' and "tiny portions," to which restaurants are you referring?

                http://thewizardofroz.wordpress.com

                1. re: NYJewboy
                  f
                  FoodDabbler RE: NYJewboy Dec 13, 2011 08:22 PM

                  " most people want an Indian place to be more direct, relaxed, and less presentation oriented."

                  Why is that? Should French, Italian, and Japanese places (for example) also be "direct, relaxed, and less presentation oriented" or are they exempt from the requirement?

                  As I've said, I agree that Indian restaurants in Manhattan are not good, in general. But knocking the couple of places that are experimenting with the cuisine at the high end isn't the answer.

                  1. re: FoodDabbler
                    s
                    sugartoof RE: FoodDabbler Dec 13, 2011 10:13 PM

                    If they can do it without the the expense of losing the soul of the cuisine, then more power to them. It's not a matter of being high end.

                    1. re: sugartoof
                      MGZ RE: sugartoof Dec 15, 2011 01:39 AM

                      Well stated. Nevertheless, very few chefs can successfully cater to their "high end" clientele without losing the "soul of the cuisine." In fact, that appears to be the OP's fundamental premise as well as the shortfalls of the places exemplified as the "haute" offerings in this subthread.

                      By way of analogy, I submit that Pat Boone sold a lot more copies of "Ain't That A Shame" than Fats Domino did.* Similarly, if it were not for Elvis Presley, who would know who Big Mama Thornton was? Cuisines that are more familiar to the popular palate** can be triumphantly "recreated;" however, in many ways it seems that the current state of Indian food in Manhattan restaurants is still devoid of its essential funk and it is that fundamental funk that sometimes takes certain dishes to that next level of delicious.

                      *At least contemporarily.
                      **I refer to the examples given above.

                      1. re: MGZ
                        s
                        sugartoof RE: MGZ Dec 15, 2011 10:45 AM

                        By funk, do you mean the romanticized Taxi stand buffet experience or throwing up crazy pepper lights for decor? Few of those places ever turned out top notch foods.

                        When I think of good Indian food in New York, I think of a misnomer for a mish mash of national cuisines of that region, and as I said before, a UK experience, or mimicking Colonial hotel fine dining with showy serving presentation. It was a poor man's replication of high end dining, so the notion that anyone rejects Indian or Pakistani food at a certain price point holds no water. Even 6th Street has Mitali East, which tries.

                        What's missing is the proper high quality spicing, and fresh food cooked in ghee and other expensive ingredients that gives it the signature flavors. The Tamarind generation of places purposely aren't offering that.

                        Who uses good spices for starters?

                        I don't mean masking poor food with heat, I mean the full range of spices.

                        Any suggestions?

                        1. re: sugartoof
                          MVNYC RE: sugartoof Dec 15, 2011 11:01 AM

                          When I think Indian funk I think asafoetida (heeng) and the lack of it in most dishes geared for the western palate. It is pretty potent, I keep mine very tightly sealed in a small mason jar to prevent my whole house from smelling.

                          1. re: MVNYC
                            s
                            sugartoof RE: MVNYC Dec 15, 2011 11:11 AM

                            Well yeah, the elephant in the room is we're talking about Westernized versions of the food. Of course, there are differences even between home cooking, and high end cooking in India itself, but it's probably off topic.

                            I think the question here is where you can get a worthwhile Samosa this side of the Holland tunnel.

                    2. re: FoodDabbler
                      u
                      uwsister RE: FoodDabbler Dec 14, 2011 11:37 PM

                      Exactly what I wanted to say - thank you, FoodDabbler.

              2. s
                Simon RE: 4 seasons Dec 12, 2011 09:12 AM

                Unfortunately, i've yet to find one that i like either.

                You might find this thread interesting:

                http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/814013

                Indus Valley, on the UWS near 100th St was good when i went there once years ago, but not enough to make a destination place for me...i've disliked every other Indian place...

                However, if your friend is interested in related cuisines, there are some wonderful options.

                Sigiri serves Sri Lankan food (very spicy, and cooked in light canola oil) in a casual BYOB setting.

                And, Kin Shop is Thai-influenced yet serves rotis and some dishes that taste similar to Indian: as mentioned in the other thread, i took my Indian-food-craving friends there and they loved it.

                -----
                Sigiri
                91 1st Ave, New York, NY 10003

                Indus Valley
                2636 Broadway, New York, NY 10025

                Kin Shop
                469 6th Ave, New York, NY 10011

                1 Reply
                1. re: Simon
                  r
                  RGR RE: Simon Dec 12, 2011 10:30 AM

                  Simon, Off-topic for this thread, but we had dinner at Ponty Bistro last Sunday. I've posted about it on the appropriate thread: http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/816254

                  http://thewizardofroz.wordpress.com

                2. s
                  sugartoof RE: 4 seasons Dec 12, 2011 10:46 AM

                  Indian and Pakistani cuisine has taken a dive in Manhattan, especially if you're looking for that UK curry style, or something similar to the Nirvana overlooking Central Park. The biggest problem I find is a lack of consistency depending on if the owners around, or you hit the days the better cook works.

                  Also, many of the places have put the attention into their decor, or attempted to modernize their dishes to follow the Tamarind, Deva route, and like most ethnic foods, the emphasis is more on regional specialties, but we've definitely lost something along the way.

                  Dhaba is still a place I would recommend for the OP, but much less enthusiastically so lately.

                  -----
                  Devi
                  8 East 18th Street, New York, NY 10003

                  Tamarind
                  41 E 22nd St, New York, NY 10010

                  Dhaba
                  108 Lexington Avenue, New York, NY 10016

                  1. chloes RE: 4 seasons Dec 12, 2011 12:52 PM

                    I've found Tamarind on 22nd Street to be consistently and authentically delicious, but you must tell them that you don't want mild food. Dawat is also authentica and full flavored. Either place you must tell your server that you are looking for spicy food otherwise they might err on teh side of caution and make your dish mild. Tulsi and Junoon are also great choices - but I just feel they aren't as authentic or full-flavored.

                    1. roxlet RE: 4 seasons Dec 13, 2011 05:13 AM

                      How about this place, which he New York Times says is where all the Indian cab drivers eat:

                      http://www.nytimes.com/2011/11/13/nyr...

                      6 Replies
                      1. re: roxlet
                        f
                        FoodDabbler RE: roxlet Dec 13, 2011 07:13 AM

                        I've had the food there several times. It is very uneven, and you have to catch things as they come out. Some of the food sits around for a long time.

                        -----
                        Haandi
                        113 Lexington Ave, New York, NY 10016

                        1. re: roxlet
                          s
                          sugartoof RE: roxlet Dec 13, 2011 10:40 AM

                          I've also visited Haandi countless times and found the food to be iffy, mostly bland, greasy, and dried out.

                          t's a last resort kind of place, not a destination, but I will say, I've lucked out and had really great food there that surprised. It was the luck of the draw, and I've even gone back the next day, ordered the same dish, and got totally different results with food I had to throw out.

                          -----
                          Haandi
                          113 Lexington Ave, New York, NY 10016

                          1. re: sugartoof
                            m
                            michelleats RE: sugartoof Dec 13, 2011 10:56 AM

                            This has been my experience with Haandi, too. I think its popularity has more to do with the speed, the prices and the company. Dil E Punjab is similar. It's good, not great, but lots of Sikh drivers end up there because the food is inexpensive and they're likely to run into friends.

                            -----
                            Dil-e Punjab
                            170 9th Ave, New York, NY 10011

                            Haandi
                            113 Lexington Ave, New York, NY 10016

                            1. re: michelleats
                              c
                              comiendosiempre RE: michelleats Dec 13, 2011 06:48 PM

                              I've walked into Haandi a couple times. Each time I've turned around and walked out. It just never looks that appetizing ......
                              We will have to try it.

                              We also have had some good food at Tamarind, on 22d street, not the one in TriBeCa.

                              For a quick fix, the samosas at Curry in a Hurry are actually quite good. In don't know about the rest of their food.

                              -----
                              Tamarind
                              41 E 22nd St, New York, NY 10010

                              Curry in a Hurry
                              119 Lexington Ave, New York, NY 10016

                            2. re: sugartoof
                              MVNYC RE: sugartoof Dec 13, 2011 01:30 PM

                              In my experience you can't have specific dishes in mind, you have to go and see what looks good at that time and order that. Also, long stewed items do better in the trays as the quality suffers less.

                              1. re: sugartoof
                                s
                                Simon RE: sugartoof Dec 13, 2011 01:57 PM

                                yeah, sadly, these days the NY Times Dining section is little more than a More Pretentious Version of Yelp...it's not written for chowhounds; it's written for people who have never even pondered the kind of questions that are asked here every day (i.e. instead asking something interesting and food-oriented like "Where can i find authentic delicious Kerala fishcakes?", the NY Times asks and then half-answers questions like "Wow, i wonder where cabbies eat? I bet it's somewhere totally hole-in-the-wall where people pray to Mecca!" (as that article points out)...wish they'd made Asimov the food critic, as he seems to know what's-what a lot more often than the food people...

                            3. f
                              FoodDabbler RE: 4 seasons Dec 13, 2011 07:17 AM

                              I don't have the time to wax on about this question as much as I'd like, but I want to say that I agree with those who think that the standard of Indian food in Manhattan is, in general, dismal. I've made more detailed comments on the issue here and there on various threads.

                              1. Bob Martinez RE: 4 seasons Dec 13, 2011 07:19 AM

                                A little perspective from those who consider NY Indian food "dreary" would be useful. Which Indian restaurants do you consider good? (Obviously they're not in NY but we could then move over to the appropriate board and see what the critical consensus is.) Then when we travel we can all go to them and have great meals.

                                Please. Tell us about them.

                                12 Replies
                                1. re: Bob Martinez
                                  s
                                  Simon RE: Bob Martinez Dec 13, 2011 08:16 AM

                                  Even when i lived in cities where i ate and enjoyed Indian food in restaurants (i.e. LA, Boston, Bangkok), and when i traveled in India, i came to a premilinary conclusion that with Indian cuisine there is a far wider gap between The Awesome Food Cooked In People's Homes vs Restaurant Food than there is in most other cuisines...

                                  Not sure the reason for this, just seemed to be the case.

                                  The NY Times had an article about the (sadly declining) lunch-wallah industry in India, where thousands of hot lunches every day, cooked at home usually by workers' wives/mothers are delivered to their work...and how in India most people will like/trust the food cooked in their home better than anything they could get in a restaurant...

                                  Until someone opens/finds a decent Indian place in Manhattan, i'm going to stick w/ adjacent cuisines like the Sri Lankan food at Sigiri, or the Thai-influenced-served-with-roti food at Kin Shop...and cook my own saag paneer at home w/ organic spinach and extra garam masala...

                                  1. re: Simon
                                    MVNYC RE: Simon Dec 13, 2011 08:42 AM

                                    I think Simon is right in regards to the gap between " The Awesome Food Cooked In People's Homes vs Restaurant Food than there is in most other cuisines..." I grew up with Punjabi and Pakistani friends whose houses I ate at a lot. The mothers were excellent cooks who taught me a lot. My friends never eat out at Indian restaurants for this reason. That said, this is the reason why I like Haandi, it tastes like good home cooking

                                    1. re: MVNYC
                                      s
                                      sugartoof RE: MVNYC Dec 13, 2011 10:43 AM

                                      Do you recall what hour of the day you visit Haandi?

                                      1. re: sugartoof
                                        MVNYC RE: sugartoof Dec 13, 2011 01:25 PM

                                        Usually normal dinner hours 530-800. Occasionally late night

                                        1. re: MVNYC
                                          s
                                          sugartoof RE: MVNYC Dec 13, 2011 01:39 PM

                                          I ask because I keep hoping there's a formula for figuring out their better hours, when they serve better food, but apparently not.

                                          Also, I wouldn't want to replicate any homecooking that allows for some of their uneven spicing, and either dried out or extremely watery foods. The good news is it tastes like it looks, and it's all right in front of you to decide before ordering.

                                          1. re: sugartoof
                                            MVNYC RE: sugartoof Dec 13, 2011 01:46 PM

                                            Everytime I am in there is is busy if that helps so I am guessing more turnover. I bet the early stuff gets cleaned up by the cabbies getting off their shifts.

                                            As you said, you can see the food so don't order things that are dried out or watery. I don't go for the kebabs here, usually two stewed dishes that look good and a vegetable that looks good. There are clunkers occasionally but you can usually spot them by looking at them. The salad is crap but the freshly made naan is good

                                            1. re: MVNYC
                                              s
                                              sugartoof RE: MVNYC Dec 13, 2011 03:33 PM

                                              I haven't found any correlation to how crowded it is, so much as who is in the kitchen and if they're refilling items. Sometimes the refill end up looking worse, sometimes better. There's no consistency in the style they serve either. A simple samosa can taste drastically different in style one week to the next.

                                              Curry Express and Lahora suffer from the same problems, but they're a little safer.

                                              -----
                                              Lahori Kabab
                                              124 Lexington Ave, New York, NY 10016

                                              Curry Express
                                              130 E 29th St, New York, NY 10016

                                              1. re: sugartoof
                                                MVNYC RE: sugartoof Dec 14, 2011 06:21 AM

                                                I have been eating here for eight or so years and have not found this to be the case. As i said the longer cooked items are the way to go and are pretty consistent.

                                                I have never liked the samosas here. The combos are cheap and filling (I usually get two meals out of them) and there isn't a need to order more in my opinion. I used to like Shaheen Sweets for their samosas but since they left I haven't found one I really like in Curry Hill for a quick snack. Any recs for meat samosas in the area?

                                                1. re: MVNYC
                                                  f
                                                  FoodDabbler RE: MVNYC Dec 14, 2011 06:57 AM

                                                  Samosas are tricky because like all deep-fried foods they're best fresh. There isn't the turnover even on that stretch of Lex for any place to be selling samosas as they fry them. Then there's the question of style. A lot of places serve only the puffed, inflated tetrahedra made with short pastry dough that are often called "Punabi samosas". I like this version only with vegetable fillings. For meat, I prefer the thinner, flatter triangles made with with very thin pastry dough (think thick phyllo). Not everybody makes these, and there might be people who prefer the Punjabi style even with meat fillings. Finally, there's the question of meat. I like minced lamb or goat, but chicken is increasingly the filling of choice.

                                                  I haven't had great samosas anywhere in New York (freshly fried, greaseless, and with fillings that pack real punch), but the chicken samosas at Lahori Kebab, roughly across the street from Haandi, surprised me once by being moderately tasty, with a nice mouthfilling aroma of clove.

                                                  -----
                                                  Lahori Kabab
                                                  124 Lexington Ave, New York, NY 10016

                                                  1. re: FoodDabbler
                                                    rose water RE: FoodDabbler Dec 14, 2011 07:55 AM

                                                    Neerob in the Bronx has samosas in the latter style you describe, and they're quite good. Their food is certainly full flavored and spicy, though quite greasy. Some of it is amazing (mixed vegetable, spinach, and okra stuff, samosas stand out), but some (the ketchup-y flavored chicken) is awful.

                                                    http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/788859

                                                    1. re: FoodDabbler
                                                      MVNYC RE: FoodDabbler Dec 14, 2011 07:14 PM

                                                      This is true and there is no real way of telling when they fry them. I personally like all kinds of samosas (all dough wrapped meat forms really) so I am only looking for what is good. They are a good snack, it is too bad there are no really good ones.

                                                    2. re: MVNYC
                                                      s
                                                      sugartoof RE: MVNYC Dec 14, 2011 09:23 AM

                                                      Lahori is better for samosas, specifically if you want chicken (the only people making meat consistently in the area are Curry in a Hurry, which are kind of good, in a strange way.

                                                      Haandi and all the rest seem to only make really good samosas on their holidays, when they spice the things properly and fry up fresher batches.

                                                      I too miss Shaheen Sweets (I think they have other locations still), but I don't get the Haandi thing. I was inspired to drop in last night, and turned right back around. I couldn't find anything to order that wasn't dried to the point of scary, or soupy looking. This was around 7pm.

                                                      -----
                                                      Lahori Kabab
                                                      124 Lexington Ave, New York, NY 10016

                                                      Haandi
                                                      113 Lexington Ave, New York, NY 10016

                                    2. chloes RE: 4 seasons Dec 13, 2011 09:04 AM

                                      Perhaps this has something to do with the fact that Indians from India are used to eating food in their homes, prepared by a cook. Even middle class families have cooks there and most become very accustomed to homemade food. That is not to say that homemade food should have more full bodied flavor than that in a 5-star, but most Indians are used to eating at home. That being said, my parents, born in India and living here for 35+years, will never eat at an Indian restaurant and call the food sublime or above average - to them the best food comes out of their own kitchens. Perhaps this is similar to a lot of "Indian" palates in NYC?

                                      For myself, having grown up eating homemade puri and chole for breakfast and paranthas w/ homemade yogurt as after-school snacks, I tend to seek out food that tastes (and has the same oil content) as my mom's. I am forever in search of her paranthas... her puri-twin can be found at Tamarind.

                                      Another note is that India has a very diverse cuisine. Growing up in a Punjabi home, I don't find the fascination with Kerala fish cakes and other seafood. Give me some Rajma that's been simmering all morning and a Roti and I'm good. Perhaps that means that we, Indian food lovers, can't easily come to a consensus on a cuisine (or restaurant, in this case) because of all the different type of Indian food out there.

                                      I think there are a few Indian spots that do a few key dishes really well. I tend to go back again and again....

                                      When an Indian restaurant serving a wide range of dishes does dosa really well, I am very impressed to find out that that same chef is a sarson ka saag whiz. It's like coming to American, eating at a Fried Chicken joint and wondering why the Pizza isn't good.

                                      2 Replies
                                      1. re: chloes
                                        m
                                        michelleats RE: chloes Dec 13, 2011 10:52 AM

                                        >>That being said, my parents, born in India and living here for 35+years, will never eat at an Indian restaurant and call the food sublime or above average - to them the best food comes out of their own kitchens. Perhaps this is similar to a lot of "Indian" palates in NYC?

                                        Good point. But I do know quite a few bachelors who can't cook and who do get pretty excited about some restaurant food. :)

                                        >> I think there are a few Indian spots that do a few key dishes really well. I tend to go back again and again....

                                        I'd love to know what's on your short list!

                                        ETA:

                                        Just saw your post, above. Are there particular dishes you like at Tamarind and Dawat?

                                        1. re: michelleats
                                          chloes RE: michelleats Dec 13, 2011 11:32 AM

                                          You are right about bachelors! My Indian bachelor friends in NYC often have snacks delivered by their moms because they complain they have no good Indian food in the city either. Again, I think the culprit is people that are familiar with Indian food are comparing restaurant food to that served in their homes. I love my mom's cooking, but I get as easily excited about Tamarind too!

                                          Here are the ones that keep me coming back for the food....
                                          I favor Dhaba for snacks (Chat), Roomali or Kathi Roll Co for rolls (chicken Tikka or Aloo), Chinese Mirch for Indo-Chinese (the chili-chicken and gobi Manchurian are outstanding), Tamarind Tribeca for trendy atmosphere, Dawat for midtown business lunch (great puris here too!), Junoon for impressive plating and excellent service, Devi for authentic family dinner(excellent subzis and mahknis), and Spice Market for fusion when I'm introducing non-adventurous types to the cuisine (yes, I am aware that this is NOT "indian").

                                          I have yet to find a perfect Samosa in the city - I give an honorable mention to Jean-Georges, whose samosa aren't authentic, but darn good and expertly fried!

                                          -----
                                          Devi
                                          8 East 18th Street, New York, NY 10003

                                          Spice Market
                                          403 West 13th Street, New York, NY 10014

                                          Dawat
                                          210 E. 58th St., New York, NY 10022

                                          Chinese Mirch
                                          120 Lexington Ave, New York, NY 10016

                                          Roomali
                                          97 Lexington Ave, New York, NY 10016

                                          Kati Roll Co.
                                          49 W 39th St, New York, NY 10018

                                          Dhaba
                                          108 Lexington Avenue, New York, NY 10016

                                          Tamarind
                                          99 Hudson St, New York, NY 10013

                                          Junoon
                                          27 W 24th St, New York, NY 10010

                                      2. The Chowhound Team RE: 4 seasons Dec 13, 2011 03:19 PM

                                        Folks, speculating on the why of the food scene is really pretty far off-topic for our site. We recognize it isn't really his question, but we'd ask that people keep the focus on offering suggestions for local places that might suit the poster. Speculating on why the restaurant scene isn't the way he'd like it doesn't really help anyone eat better.

                                        3 Replies
                                        1. re: The Chowhound Team
                                          f
                                          FoodDabbler RE: The Chowhound Team Dec 13, 2011 03:28 PM

                                          "One cannot dine well, eat well, savor well, if one has not speculated well."

                                          Apologies to Virginia Woolf.

                                          1. re: The Chowhound Team
                                            s
                                            Simon RE: The Chowhound Team Dec 13, 2011 03:53 PM

                                            the "why" is discussing the nature of Indian food in Manhattan: that doesn't seem terribly far off-topic...and it could indeed lead to helping us eat better...for example, what if someone knew of a home-style place or in-home-kitchen that was Indian? (ala Dave Santos of Griffou) -- i have a lead on one of these...

                                            We could all just make lists, but that's not really all that helpful either without some commentary on the why/how/etc...

                                            1. re: Simon
                                              4
                                              4 seasons RE: Simon Dec 13, 2011 04:02 PM

                                              thank you Simon et al. I thought that's exactly what a chowhound does: experiment, discover, savor (or not) using his (or her, in my case) critical faculties and experiences. Rather than merely reacting impulsively, as I fear many replies reflect (sneakereater who blames without reading posts carefully), we all need to ingest and digest (including analysis) our food, Chowhound Team!

                                          2. t
                                            tigerwoman RE: 4 seasons Dec 14, 2011 01:06 PM

                                            have you tried Aaheli on 9th Avenue btwn 54/55th? Small joint - only seats about 20 and food is quite tasty and not the same old same old dull crap. I really really LOVE the fried okra appetizer -Karrarri bhindi as well as the eggplant appetizer with tamarind sauce. Also their version of chicken makani (butter chicken) is lovely and finished with fresh curry leaves.

                                            It's also BYOB with no corkage.

                                            -----
                                            Aaheli
                                            826 9th Ave, New York, NY 10019

                                            1. jonkyo RE: 4 seasons Dec 14, 2011 01:23 PM

                                              I have not read the entire thread, so I do not know if I am repeating what others state, but I have known many Indian people from Upstate to Connecticut and all say one must g to New Jersey for really good Indian food.

                                              In London there is the Brick Lane, a place near Whitechaple, and there is never any problem to find excellent Indian food on this long lane lined wth Indian restaurants, but upon a visit to Indian restaurant named after this unique dining location in London, called Brick Lane on East 6th Street in NewYork City jsut off 2nd, for my favorite dish I used to eat on every visit to London's Brick Lane, I was greatly disappointed. It was not the correct consistency, and failed really to please me, though enjoyed the temperature.

                                              Adam of Man vs. Food actually made this once secret confined to London, famous, and made it a food challenge. It is Phall, originating in Brick Lane London, where it is so delicious. The Phall made famous by Adam in NYC's Brick Lane is not that great. Good for television, but not for Indian food lovers.

                                              What is a challenge for Adam is sheer delight for me, well, in London at least:

                                              Man vs Food Brick Lane phall: http://www.eatmedaily.com/2009/01/the...

                                              In my effort to find hot food, really hot food, in a style similar to Indain, I found a great place perhaps many here know of. Sri Lankan restaurant on 1st Ave.

                                              It is called Sigiri, and it is next to the Bangledesh restaurant on 1st Ave, just up from from 5th on the west side of the street. No beer, but one can select from some great Indian beers or other in the shop below. Ihad a really hot dish there, but as I looked at other foods being ordered by other customers, I could tell there are some really splendid dishes on the menu.

                                              http://www.sigirinyc.com/

                                              -----
                                              Sigiri
                                              91 1st Ave, New York, NY 10003

                                              Show Hidden Posts