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chicken pot pie

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cheesecake17 Nov 27, 2011 02:52 PM

I have a lot of roasted chicken leftover from Shabbat dinner and I was hoping to use it in a chicken pot pie. Any tried and true recipes? Everything I've seen in my cookbooks uses milk/cream.

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  1. queenscook RE: cheesecake17 Nov 27, 2011 03:23 PM

    There are so many usable milk substitutes these days; why not use one of them (Mimiccreme,soy milk, almond milk, etc.)?

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      vallevin RE: cheesecake17 Nov 27, 2011 04:38 PM

      I've done it with a simple white sauce by making a roux (with margerine) and then thinning with water.

      18 Replies
      1. re: vallevin
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        susiejane RE: vallevin Nov 27, 2011 05:05 PM

        I frequently use leftover chicken soup to make a roux, along with the leftover roast chicken

        1. re: susiejane
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          jeanmarieok RE: susiejane Nov 28, 2011 09:36 AM

          I often make a roux and thin with chicken broth - no need for any dairy !

        2. re: vallevin
          scubadoo97 RE: vallevin Nov 27, 2011 05:07 PM

          Can also use oil and flour and thin with stock

          1. re: scubadoo97
            c
            cheesecake17 RE: scubadoo97 Nov 28, 2011 07:56 AM

            I've never made anything like this before. How much oil/margarine and flour would I use? I have about half a chicken cut into pieces.

            1. re: cheesecake17
              k
              koshergastronome RE: cheesecake17 Nov 28, 2011 08:16 AM

              Take about 3-4 tablespoons of margarine/olive oil/or any type of oil...melt it over med heat..when melted add same amount of flour, and stir to incorporate...you'll know the roux is good to go when it starts smelling nutty, then add 3-4 cups of chicken stock (or whatever liquid you plan on using...you can go with water if you want, but obviously it won't be as flavorful), and cook until the stock reduces and thickens up...this is essentially the road to making a gravy, but i dont think you want it that thick...toss in your chicken, and peas, or whatever, and pour it into your pie
              If you want to add other vegetables that could benefit from a pre-sautee (like onions) then just add it after your oil melts, and before you add the flour, and just add the flour whenever the veggies are sauteed

              1. re: koshergastronome
                c
                cheesecake17 RE: koshergastronome Nov 28, 2011 09:24 AM

                Thank you for the detailed recipe. I was planning to put the chicken mixture in a pyrex and top it with puff pastry. Would that work instead of a pie shell?

                1. re: cheesecake17
                  weinstein5 RE: cheesecake17 Nov 28, 2011 09:34 AM

                  That should work - I have seen a number of cooking shows that have made 'quick pies' that way -

                  1. re: cheesecake17
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                    ferret RE: cheesecake17 Nov 28, 2011 09:35 AM

                    It works any way you want it to work - no top, no bottom, top and bottom. It's a slightly different experience each way. There's no "better" or "worse" just different.

                    1. re: cheesecake17
                      k
                      koshergastronome RE: cheesecake17 Nov 28, 2011 09:39 AM

                      Yeah, or if u want to get fancy and make individualized portions, you can put it in individual ramekins and top each with some puff pastry ...but it will definitely work the way you said

                      1. re: koshergastronome
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                        cheesecake17 RE: koshergastronome Nov 29, 2011 06:04 AM

                        Thank you all! I made the filling- flour/oil thinned with chicken broth. I sauteed onion and carrot in the oil before adding the flour. I added salt, pepper, paprika, and thyme. Need to buy some puff pastry squares to top it off.

                        Thank you again :)

                        1. re: cheesecake17
                          k
                          koshergastronome RE: cheesecake17 Nov 29, 2011 08:51 AM

                          great, im sure it will be great

                          1. re: cheesecake17
                            scubadoo97 RE: cheesecake17 Nov 29, 2011 09:44 AM

                            can you find kosher puff pastry?

                            1. re: scubadoo97
                              k
                              koshergastronome RE: scubadoo97 Nov 29, 2011 10:01 AM

                              Pepperidge farm is kosher and non dairy

                              1. re: scubadoo97
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                                cheesecake17 RE: scubadoo97 Nov 29, 2011 12:04 PM

                                I buy the Mazor's brand. It comes in squares or a sheet. Kosher and parve.

                          2. re: cheesecake17
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                            rockycat RE: cheesecake17 Nov 30, 2011 06:58 AM

                            Just remember - do not burn your roux. A burnt roux tastes awful and cannot be saved. Ever. For a chicken sauce you probably want a pale roux so as not to add much color to your sauce. A darker roux has more flavor but also loses thickening power the darker it gets. Low and slow, stirring constantly is the traditional way to cook a roux, but I've been known to speed up the process when I get too impatient.

                            1. re: rockycat
                              c
                              cheesecake17 RE: rockycat Nov 30, 2011 08:05 AM

                              The roux didn't burn, and my husband loved the dish.

                        2. re: cheesecake17
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                          ferret RE: cheesecake17 Nov 28, 2011 08:24 AM

                          The simple (simplest) recipe I can give you is equal amounts of chicken broth and Mimiccreme (I use canned broth and then measure out a canful of Mimiccreme), then I bring it to a boil. While it's warming I mix a couple of tablespoons of cornstarch with a couple of tablespoons of the liquid until it's smooth and add it to the saucepan. Bring it to a boil for a couple of minutes and you'll see it thicken.

                          Then fill your par-baked crust with shredded chicken and frozen peas and carrots (you can add onions but I prefer it without) and pour in the sauce to just below the crimp line. You can add a top crust -- or not.

                      2. re: vallevin
                        r
                        rockycat RE: vallevin Nov 30, 2011 06:55 AM

                        +1

                        I really dislike cream sauces in general so I'll make a pareve roux and use broth whenever possible.

                      3. k
                        koshergastronome RE: cheesecake17 Nov 27, 2011 05:03 PM

                        I don't remember the exact recipe, but I've made chicken pot pie with out milk..
                        a pot pie is basically leftover chicken, with chicken stock thickened with a roux (which is fat plus flour [equal ratios of both by weight work fine] cooked down) and then thrown in a pie with the leftover chicken and any adornments you see fit (peas are a classic...if you want, you can simmer onions and any other veggie you want to use in the oil for the roux, and then add in your flour...and then add your stock)

                        1. s
                          sharonfl RE: cheesecake17 Dec 1, 2011 06:45 AM

                          I make chicken pot pie using leftover chicken from soup along with some of the leftover broth and do what some of the others have suggested, thickening it up with flour. However instead of a roux I skip the fat of the roux by whisking in Wondra flour. The advantage of this is that Wondra is "instantized" and doesn't clump like other flours. If you don't have broth from you leftovers, just use chicken soup powder.

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