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"Medium Chain Triglycerides" Added to Dried Apricots

z
zooxanthellae Nov 13, 2011 05:12 PM

I bought a bag of Mariani dried apricots and one of the listed ingredients is "Medium Chain Triglycerides (Coconut and/or Palm Kernel)". And apricots, if it isn't just my imagination, have a slightly "buttery" aftertaste. But the fat content in a 1/4 cup serving is still listed as 0g (so I assume this means it's <0.5g). Also, the apricots feel much moister and juicier than normal.

Does anyone know why these are in there? I've never seen these in other dried apricots.

  1. paulj Nov 18, 2011 08:31 PM

    Maybe it is oil or shortening added to the apricots (or packaging) to reduce sticking. I just cut up some Lebanese dried apricot paste, and noticed how sticky it was.

    However I don't see this triglycerides listed at
    http://shop.mariani.com/Mediterranean...

    1. z
      zooxanthellae Nov 15, 2011 11:04 AM

      No answers - does nobody know the answer to my question, or is my question confusing?

      1 Reply
      1. re: zooxanthellae
        Niki in Dayton Nov 15, 2011 11:45 AM

        A quick google search shows this on Wiki: Medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs) are medium-chain (6 to 12 carbons) fatty acid esters of glycerol.

        MCTs passively diffuse from the GI tract to the portal system (longer fatty acids are absorbed into the lymphatic system) without requirement for modification like long-chain fatty acids or very-long-chain fatty acids. In addition, MCTs do not require bile salts for digestion. Patients that have malnutrition or malabsorption syndromes are treated with MCTs because they do not require energy for absorption, utilization, or storage. Coconut oil is composed of approximately 66% medium-chain triglycerides. Other rich sources of MCTs include palm kernel oils and camphor tree drupes. The fatty acids found in MCTs are called medium-chain fatty acids.

        Now, as to why they were added to your apricots, my guess is to make them seem moister. How that works, exactly, is beyond me, but some food chemist will probably answer!

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