HOME > Chowhound > New Jersey >
Brewing beer, curing meat, or making cheese?
TELL US

Slow poached hen egg at Nicholas

seal Nov 12, 2011 03:59 PM

Has anyone tried the egg with truffle at Nicholas? I am thinking about going to the bar tomorrow and was wondering if it is worth the $60. If I don't hear from anyone beforehand, I will post tomorrow night myself.

  1. Upload a photo (10 MB limit)
Delete
  1. equal_Mark Nov 12, 2011 04:26 PM

    I myself have found the rooster eggs to be heartier and more assertive. They stand up better to the seasoning...

    1. a
      aklein Nov 13, 2011 05:39 AM

      I'm the taste/quality/technique/execution is amazing here, but... $60 FOR A POACHED EGG WITH TRUFFLES?! EXCUSE ME?!

      sorry, can't get behind it

      1. j
        JerZ Wine Geek Nov 13, 2011 06:39 AM

        Ok, so $60 is not cheap for an appetizer.... But I've had it twice before and In my opinion it's worth every penny. But I can certainly understand people that flip out about the price. It's a perspective thing. Income not withstanding, some people refuse to pay more than $100 for a dinner for two, some people are willing to pay $2,000. Just like some people refuse to pay more than $30,000 for a car, while some people are willing to spend $150,000. If you are really into food and are willing to treat yourself once in a while, then go for it. That's my $0.02.

        7 Replies
        1. re: JerZ Wine Geek
          a
          aklein Nov 13, 2011 06:51 AM

          JerZ... you make a fair point and in no way am I railing against Nicholas or trying to force people to boycott the dish... but I just can't seem to get past the terms "poached egg" and "$60" in the same sentence

          now, if you're the one buying... haha!

          1. re: aklein
            j
            JerZ Wine Geek Nov 14, 2011 06:06 AM

            Haha, I can understand that.

            Obviously what makes it $60 is the fresh white truffle. I believe it's somewhere around $2,400/lb for restaurants to purchase this season (significantly more for us as normal consumers... D'artagnan is selling it right now for $304/oz) and Nicholas gives roughly 1/5oz portion. So that truffle on the plate cost Mr. Harary roughly $30. The same portion size by D'artagnan prices is $68. So really $60 is pretty darn fair for the dish.

            1. re: JerZ Wine Geek
              m
              Mr. Bingley Nov 15, 2011 03:35 AM

              and if I poach it from your plate then it's free!

          2. re: JerZ Wine Geek
            MGZ Nov 13, 2011 07:16 AM

            Could you describe the dish? What's it look like plated?

            I had a poached egg & truffle plate as part of a truffle menu there couple years ago which, frankly, was not particularly special. I'm wondering if it's the same dish.

            1. re: MGZ
              seal Nov 13, 2011 04:39 PM

              The dish looked like a nice sized bowl of foamy soup over which was shaved five or six slices of white truffle. The parmesian foam covered the white of the duck egg and a few slices of duck prosciutto. It was served with three slices of toasted brioche.
              It was a very rich dish and I don't think I could have eaten more than the ample portion provided, but an extra shaving of truffle might have been nice ;o)
              I'm sure the reason for the price tag is that the winter white truffles are quite costly - much more so than the black summer ones that they use in their annual truffle tasting menu dinner. For me it was well worth the money but not something I would return for.

              1. re: seal
                MGZ Nov 14, 2011 05:25 AM

                Thanks. The dish is similar, but certainly not the same. The duck egg alone is different - it didn't even occur to me that's what was meant by "hen." Much more food on the plate as well.

                1. re: MGZ
                  equal_Mark Nov 14, 2011 06:40 PM

                  Duck = hen? Since when? I still prefer rooster eggs....

          Show Hidden Posts