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What to do with boiled chicken?

r
Rosiepigs Nov 9, 2011 09:52 AM

This has to be a classic debate--what do you do with the chicken meat after making chicken soup? My mother eats it cold and plain, and there's an old family recipe of frying it up in oil with onions (although, to make it more authentic I guess I could use shmaltz.) Neither of those are particularly satisfying, particularly the cold and plain stuff. blah. What do other people do with the post-soup meat?

  1. k
    Krislady Nov 10, 2011 05:57 AM

    I'm kind of embarrassed to admit that, after simmering all day, I just use the meat (primarily from the drumsticks) for dog-training treats for the next several days. Along with the carrots. Amazing how quickly the pup will come, or sit, or down (or probably jump through a flaming hoop) if he thinks there's a chance of chicken.

    Oh, and Kitty gets her share, too.

    1. OCEllen Nov 9, 2011 10:29 PM

      Chicken salad for sandwiches - chopped celery and onion, a little red bell pepper, mayo, maybe some mustard, pickles or pickle relish, chill...between bread then ...or mounded with lettuce and tomatoes... SALAD!

      1. f
        FoodPopulist Nov 9, 2011 09:52 PM

        Eat it with the soup? My parents preferred making chicken soup from wings and drumsticks, so that is what we would do. If something with more meat was used, that might go into a chicken macaroni salad.

        I would lean towards heating it up and eating it with a dipping sauce. That could be something as simple as a Thai sweet chili out of a bottle or something more complex. I might go with spicy or something else that might overpower any flavor in the chicken. If it's bland, you're not missing or wasting anything and you basically have a protein delivery system to get a sauce to your mouth.

        1. n
          nattythecook Nov 9, 2011 09:15 PM

          1. Serve it with hot and spicy yellow bean sauce: yellow bean sauce, soy sauce, sugar, julienne ginger (lots), minced garlic, chopped Thai chili peppers, vinegar and chopped cilantro. The sauce totally turns around the bland chicken.

          2. Fry it with oil and sprinkle salt on it. Use low heat and fry until everything is crispy. It's a cross between potato chips and chicken. If chicken skin is your thing, you'll love it crispy.

          3. Make chicken tamale.

          1. eight_inch_pestle Nov 9, 2011 03:08 PM

            If it's still got some life in it you could make a nice laab gai---chopped chicken with lime juice, fish sauce, shallot, rice powder, loads of fresh mint, etc.

            1. sunshine842 Nov 9, 2011 01:11 PM

              I chop it roughly and put it back in my soup just before serving.

              1. a
                aletnes Nov 9, 2011 12:38 PM

                Also it can be shredded for enchilada / burrito filling

                1. w
                  wattacetti Nov 9, 2011 12:01 PM

                  You've got one ingredient necessary for omu-raisu: use the chicken for fried rice, stain with tomato sauce/ketchup, top with an omelette, and sauce with demi-glace sauce.

                  Or you could make chicken floss and use it to fill things like onigiri.

                  1. John E. Nov 9, 2011 10:44 AM

                    Tacos, chicken tortilla soup, my mother made chicken crepes using, 'gasp' cream of mushroom soup, cracker crumbs, sauteed onions and celery and milk for the filling and more soup and milk as the gravy, filled and rolled the crepes and baked in the oven.

                    2 Replies
                    1. re: John E.
                      g
                      gourmanda Nov 9, 2011 12:03 PM

                      To John E's excellent suggestions I'd add: chicken salad, pot pie, paprikash, with white beans for chili; and take his mother's idea but make it fancy with a Crepes a la Reine recipe. Delicious!

                      1. re: gourmanda
                        John E. Nov 9, 2011 05:22 PM

                        I guess my mother didn't know it, but she was making Crepes a la Reine all those years. I simified what she was making, but I glanced at a recipe for Crepes a la Reine and it seems the only significant difference was that she used the mushroom soup instead of a roux.

                    2. w
                      wyogal Nov 9, 2011 10:16 AM

                      I only make the stock from a carcass. If I do boil a chicken in it, I take it out before the meat becomes flavorless, take the meat off the bone, reserve it; then toss the carcass back in the pot and simmer the heck out of it. I leave a bit of meat on the bones. Then, I figured I've gotten enough out of the bird, strain, and toss the solids.
                      Then, I can use that "boiled chicken" and use it for just about anything because it still has a good flavor.
                      And the stock is good, too.

                      3 Replies
                      1. re: wyogal
                        Will Owen Nov 9, 2011 10:57 AM

                        Yes, simmer the chicken (no boiling!!) until it tests almost done, pull it out and let it rest a bit, then remove the meat and throw the carcass back in. Back when we got most of our chickens on the hoof, as it were, you could buy an old laying hen that was good only for soup, but birds over a year old simply don't seem to exist anymore. Those things had a depth of flavor we can only remember, and the unborn eggs were a delicious addition to the gravy, or the noodle soup or dumpling dish. A lot of messy work, too, of course, when you're starting with a live and very annoyed chicken!

                        1. re: Will Owen
                          bernalgirl Nov 9, 2011 03:04 PM

                          I remove the meat from the bones, roast the carcass until it's nicely browned, then simmer the stock for another 45 min- 1 hr.

                          As for uses for leftover meat, my running list of what to do with cooked chicken includes:
                          1) Saute onion, carrots, celery and any other veggies you have on hand, adding chopped garlic, herbs and spices as preferred. Remove mixture from pan. In the same pan, make a light roux, add milk or chicken broth and when thickened, add veggies and chicken and bring to a simmer. This makes a great filling for chicken pot pie, with pie crust or drop biscuits on top. I also do cornmeal biscuits and put a lid on to steam them into dumplings. And it is to die for with Jerusalem artichokes.

                          2) The blog the kitchn has a great recipe for kale and chicken stew, I use leftover chicken and sub the potatoes out for cooked quinoa. http://www.thekitchn.com/thekitchn/he...

                          3) Quesadillas. Cheese and salsa are the perfect antidote to bland chicken. Enchiladas, too, for that matter.

                          4) Goi Ga or Vietnamese chicken salad with shredded cabbage and herbs. Again, washes away the blandness of boiled chicken.

                          1. re: bernalgirl
                            Will Owen Nov 9, 2011 03:52 PM

                            Molé works pretty well too. I was just thinking of that in connection with leftover turkey. Chicken enchiladas Suizas, as well. As long as the meat is not like shredded balsa wood, a good rich sauce will lift it nicely. "Boiled" chicken should be only poached, anyway, at a low enough temperature so the tendons can soften up but the meat won't go dry.

                      2. k
                        Kunegunde Nov 9, 2011 10:01 AM

                        I cube it up and freeze it, then use it to gussie up prepared foods. It works good with added fresh cilantro in TJ's red pepper and tomato soup-in-a-carton, also with TJ's eggplant punjabi in a foil packet. Sometimes I make a quickie Tom Young Goong soup by adding the chicken and cilantro to boiling water and the paste in a jar available at most Asian markets.

                        1. 4
                          4Snisl Nov 9, 2011 09:54 AM

                          One option: Shred it up, season with soy sauce and toasted sesame oil and minced scallions, mix with sauteed coleslaw mix, and use at potsticker filling.

                          1 Reply
                          1. re: 4Snisl
                            j
                            jvanderh Nov 10, 2011 10:06 AM

                            +1. Or egg rolls or flautas. It's less boring after being deep fried.

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