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ginger is blueish-greenish inside

I am really irritated I went to a couple of stores to get ginger and for some reason today everyone had old ginger and I knew it would be fibrous and stringy inside by the way it looked. At the last store, I went ahead and bought the older looking ginger because it was less dry looking than the ginger at the previous two stores. So I was irritated already when I got home from the search, but then I cut into the ginger and saw it is not only fibrous (but still usable in texture) but BLUE inside. Google is telling me that this is "Hawaiian blue ginger" or special "Chinese blue ginger" but something makes me doubt that. It seems more likely that air got inside and it is oxidized, or light got inside and it is chlorophyll or something. I have seen rotten ginger and this is definitely not rotten. I tasted it and it seems like sharp ginger, nothing unusual.

What has happened to this ginger to make it blue?

I guess I am still gonna use it. Not sure if this is a when in doubt toss it out moment or what. Any advice?

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  1. I don't know what happened, but I have had ginger turn bluish green on me before. It didn't arrive that way, at least not that I noticed, but once sliced and cooking (in cast iron, as part of a curry) it turned a weird bluish tinge. FWIW we ate it anyway but I'd love to know what made that happen. it happened more than once but not more than 5 times over a 4 year span of lots of curries...

    It wasn't old, either. Looked just like regular ginger until it was in the curry simmering.

    1 Reply
    1. re: montrealeater

      I have also had onion garlic ginger turn blue-green when cooking down in certain dishes at the early stage of cooking, but it crisps up and turns out perfectly normal as well.

      1. "If you notice a blue ring after slicing your fresh ginger, do not be alarmed. It is not mold or fungus. It is simply a Hawaiian variety of ginger known as blue-ring ginger or Chinese white ginger. Pat yourself on the back for your selection because this variety is considered to be superior for its juiciness and bright flavor. They are also larger rhizomes and generally cleaner. The only down-side is blue-ring ginger is usually more expensive."

        http://homecooking.about.com/od/foods...

        http://www.hawaiianorganicginger.com/... (image

        )

        My ginger is imported from Brazil, not Hawaii. But this does fit the description. It is past it's prime, so if this is really superior stuff, I didn't get it when it was at its peak deliciousness. But does this sound right? How can it be that in years and years of ginger use, I have never come across this before?

        2 Replies
        1. re: luckyfatima

          Was it advertised as a "specialty" ginger? Maybe it was refrigerated at some point. That leads to mold BTW.

          1. re: letsindulge

            No, not at all, no special label. That's another reason why I am suspicious. It really doesn't seem to be mold but you could be right. I sent my husband out for some more ginger and used that instead anyway.

        2. I didn't read what everyone said, but just reading what you wrote. I say: "Don't use it"

          The blue ginger you mentioned should not look nasty. It should look more like this:

          http://www.hawaiianorganicginger.com/...

          1. It's not mold, unless it's some kind of superfast-growing or invisible-until-cooking mold. When sliced, there is no blueish tinge visible - it comes out when the ginger is cooked. I forgot to mention that garlic has taken on this hue, too, at the same time the ginger does (which raises the question if one is colouring the other?). This has only ever happened to me when sauteing, not sure if that could have anything to do with it.