Psst... We're working on the next generation of Chowhound! View >
HOME > Chowhound > China & Southeast Asia >
Oct 28, 2011 02:33 AM
Discussion

Run, Don't Walk to Wild Rocket in Singapore

Chef Willin Low of Wild Rocket takes Asian Fusion out of the realm of kitsch into the FABULOUS. Seriously, what this man does to a noodle will blow your mind. And his panna cotta? MY GOD. So so so good.

  1. Click to Upload a photo (10 MB limit)
Delete
  1. Good to hear compliments from *non-Singaporeans*. I liked Willin Low's food (e.g. laksa pesto paste, and his deconstructed versions of our local Hokkien prawn noodles or Chinese congee) but always wondered if foreigners can "get it" ;-)

    5 Replies
    1. re: klyeoh

      How does he deconstruct Chinese congee? It's already "deconstructed" as it is in a common format it is served in, with the chook and stuff you add offered as components you elect to put into the chook - unless he separates the liquid from the rice and presents the two separately!

      So, a lawyer turned restauranteur. There is no menu or pricing given on the website for the place. What would a typical meal there (or at Wild Oats) set one back by?

      1. re: huiray

        was he the one who invented laksa pesto, or made it popular? any how i know my first taste was at wild rocket. and i loved it!

        it's not an expensive place. i think the last time i was there we spent about 60+++ per person for dinner.

      2. re: klyeoh

        Maybe "deconstructed" may be too strong a word for Willin Low's congee (as opposed to Chef Alvin Leung of Bo Innovation's deconstructed "lap mei fun") - details of the said congee (plus photo) on the site here:
        http://is.asia-city.com/restaurants/a...

        Back to Bo Innovation's deconstructed "lap mei fun" (HK-style waxed sausages & meats steamed atop rice) - its version was a crisp golden-crusted cone (shaped from pulverised rice) filled with Chinese sausages and waxed meat-flavored ice-cream. It actually worked!

        1. re: klyeoh

          Thanks for the reply!

          Interesting. Hmm, the pic of the "chook" shown on the link you furnish suggests a dish where one made a more watery chook (with or without some kind of stock as part of the "liquid"), plated it with the rice pushed together into a heap (or drained in a sieve, retaining the liquid then putting the two together on a dish) plus some fixin's atop the heap of rice. I would imagine that one ate that dish by largely recombining the liquid and the rice pile in large part - so one got what one might expect from a bowl of watery chook at a street stall. I would be reluctant to pay - say - US$25 for that dish with 3-4 spoonfulls of stuff. Sorry if this sounds less-than-enthusiastic and, after all, I have not tasted it - but might I suggest that it is possible that restaurants may represent as amazing dishes stuff that might not necessarily be - and I mean this in the sense of both Western and Eastern cuisines and restaurants in both hemispheres. Still, I imagine Chef low's congee must have tasted very good!

          1. re: huiray

            Your suspicion was correct - Wild Rocket's congee actually tasted very "authentic" (in a good way), considering that its plating looked pretty different. The last time, I lunched there, I chose to order Willin Low's pesto laksa, but stole a taste of this congee off my friend's plate. The portion was too tiny though, considering the price tag.